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One can be lucky, or perhaps unlucky. I have re-used manifold and flange gaskets that at least looked reasonably OK, but did leak when fitted 'dry'. This was when I had run out of the 'silver frost' paint, and was having trouble finding another tin (seems to be getting rarer). I've also successfully used 'high temperature' silicon gasket maker (sensor safe of course), which works OK to seal even very hot flanges.

Regards,
John.
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I never replaced the exhaust gaskets on Sooty in well over 200Km of use (230K perhaps).  Pulled the exhaust off numerous times to change or check all manner of things; at least five I can think off the top of my head, including twice removing the turbo and manifold.

Never leaked
Wasn’t an issue
Nothing to see here

Just bolt it up, if it leaks.. order new ones, it’s not a big job to do later if an issue.
Just take care of the nuts and studs, try not to round anything off, replace with the correct bits if they’re already ruined (you will thank yourself next time you need to remove it)

/C
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Buy/Swap/Sell [Announce ONLY] / V6 GTV 916 phase 1 headers
« Last post by plantm on July 20, 2019, 11:23:16 AM »
For sale V6 GTV 916 phase 1 headers.
Purchased for my car, but I am now selling my GTV.
Headers are in good condition and not that easy to come across.

$700 posted

Contact me on 0410 395 456
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So I now have all the parts required to do this job except for the exhaust gaskets. Will I need to replace them after having dropped the exhaust to do the sway bar bushes etc or do they usually survive this process? Our very good friends at Italian Automotive Spares don't carry them in stock.

If the exhaust flange gasket or the manifold gasket is still in reasonable condition (not falling apart, no bits missing), I've had success painting the old gasket with a thickish layer of 'silver frost' paint (an oil based paint containing particles of aluminium). Obtain a tin of this paint, open it, pour off as much off the clear liquid laying on top of the thick 'sediment' as you can, then mix in the remaining fluid into the sediment with a stick (whatever) to make a uniform paste. The 'paint' basically consists of aluminium particles held together with a binding medium (ie. the liquid component of the paint, whatever that actually is). Now clean the old gasket and surfaces of the components being 'gasketed' as well as you can.

Paint the gasket with a brush and allow to dry (which should take half an hour or so). Repeat. You want a thickish layer of the 'silver frost' paint, but it doesn't have to be a completely even layer (but as even as reasonably possible). The thickish dried paint layer won't be completely hard, but somewhat 'malleable'. When the gasket is squeezed by the clamping pressure (of the flange or manifold fasteners) the paint gets squashed 'flat', and the thickness evens out. The aluminium particles move and fill any voids in the gasket itself and / or in the metal sufaces (some of the 'paint' will be squeezed out at the edges of the gasket). The paint cures / hardens / sets with engine and manifold heat in use. I've used the paint successfully even if it has become a bit lumpy over time (since the last time I opened the tin). It has never failed to work for me, and I have even used it on head gaskets both new and re-used.

This method of sealing suspect gaskets was told to me many years ago, by an old bloke who made custom gaskets for a living (gaskets for anything from racing car engines, vintage cars, to massive ship diesels etc. etc.). His business ('Universal Gaskets' from memory, but I could easily have that wrong) was a charming ancient establishment located in Balmain or pehaps Rozelle, in a rust coloured tin shed, time having stripped it of any remnant galvanising. No longer there, a lost gem...

Regards,
John.
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In the rally car we use velcro patches suitably distributed. Seems to have plenty of grip---but no speakers fitted and panel material is not original!
Facepalm.  Why didn't I think of that?  So simple.  Good share Paul.
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Arese have both gaskets on their website.

The Manifold Gasket 73502761 and the Joiner Gasket 73503584.
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Thanks Bazz. Arese only list that gasket for the TS. Is it the same as the TS? Part No 46823142 or 46772217...obviously I don't know what it looks like yet...
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Arese Spares have them.
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So I now have all the parts required to do this job except for the exhaust gaskets. Will I need to replace them after having dropped the exhaust to do the sway bar bushes etc or do they usually survive this process? Our very good friends at Italian Automotive Spares don't carry them in stock.
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Do we qualify for the Bay to Birdwood now? I have an '83 and thought that was too 'young' for it...
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