Author Topic: Car jack options?  (Read 555 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Anth73

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
Car jack options?
« on: January 19, 2019, 07:25:41 AM »
Just acquired a Ď74 GTV 2000 in need of restoration and the car came without a jack. I understand the original style jack isnít to be trusted, and a modern scissor type jack is preferred. What do other GTV owners use? Thanks for your input.

rowan_bris

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 245
Re: Car jack options?
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2019, 08:58:20 AM »
A trolley jack if you have to do any work on it, or the original jack if you get stuck on the side of the road!

Anth73

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
Re: Car jack options?
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2019, 12:59:15 PM »
A trolley jack if you have to do any work on it, or the original jack if you get stuck on the side of the road!

Was referring to the latter scenario E.g a flat tyre out on the road. Read somewhere that the Alfa 75 jack was a better option. Otherwise I need to source a 105 series jack from somewhere.

Campbeli

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 59
  • Neil Campbell
  • AROCA Member #: 8551
Re: Car jack options?
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2019, 03:39:14 PM »
Iíve been considering the same issue and recall that the Alfa 75 jack was an option.
Also recall some guys welding a metal section onto a scissor jack so that it can use the jack points of a 105.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Present:
1970 GT Junior
1999 156 T spark

Past:
1979 Alfetta GT
1978 Alfasud ti

Future:
New Giulia.......

rowan_bris

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 245
Re: Car jack options?
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2019, 06:26:18 PM »
I would just source and original one.

Anth73

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
Re: Car jack options?
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2019, 10:30:41 PM »
I have turned up a couple of original style jacks, including latter style 116 series jacks that are supposed to have the teeth and gears made from steel instead of brass that the failure prone jacks have.

At $100 to $150 itís not a cheap option though.

An interesting find was the $20 scissor jack from Supercheap Auto that actually has a rotating top fitting with a slot in it that can be widened ever so slightly, maybe 1mm each side, to fit around the existing jacking point. I personally think thatís a better way to go.

aggie57

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1434
  • AROCA Member #: 750
Re: Car jack options?
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2019, 06:24:00 AM »
If the jacking points on the car are still in good condition, i.e. not rusted, then the original jack works fine.
Alister
14 Alfa's since 1977. 
Currently 1973 GTV 2000, a couple of Mercs and a '14 Beetle (yes, seriously......)
Gone......far to many to list

GG105

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 115
  • AROCA Member #: 2236
Re: Car jack options?
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2019, 12:54:41 PM »
I agree with Alister, Iíve never had a problem with the standard jack. The cars arenít very heavy.
1969 GT 1300 Junior
1970 Giulia 1300 TI - modified
1982 GTV6
1984 SA GTV6