Author Topic: Ball joint mounted sway bars  (Read 2656 times)

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GTVeloce

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Ball joint mounted sway bars
« on: January 08, 2014, 01:03:03 PM »
I'm curious for any feedback from users who have experience with ball joint mounted sway bars. I have seen a few race prepped cars (non-alfas) and now the GT 86 claims to use one.

I wonder how good they would be with compliance etc. Perhaps a half way point between rubber/poly and rose joints?

Duk

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Re: Ball joint mounted sway bars
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2014, 07:12:43 PM »
I can't comment directly, but I am going this way with my front bar.
What I can say is that spherical bearing links will have less binding/side loading forces than bushed pivots will.
Assuming the joint has enough articulation, that is. This will cause less stress on mounts.

Notice, again, that car manufacturers DON'T use polyurethane bushings. They'll use soft or stiffer rubber bushes or they'll jump straight to spherical bearing pivots.

colcol

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Re: Ball joint mounted sway bars
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2014, 10:11:59 PM »
Alfa Romeo 147"s and 156's use ball joints for the sway bars, they are called drop links.
VT Commodores used rubber bushes, and because of the extreme angles pounded out quickly, they revised them on the VX-2 to a 2 rod end link, as i like to point out, just like Alfa Romeo did in the first place, the drop links can go to extreme angles without binding, Colin.
1974 VW Passat [ist car] 1984 Alfa 33TI [daily driver] 2002 Alfa 156 JTS [daily driver]

Duk

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Re: Ball joint mounted sway bars
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2014, 10:27:49 PM »
Alfa Romeo 147"s and 156's use ball joints for the sway bars, they are called drop links.
VT Commodores used rubber bushes, and because of the extreme angles pounded out quickly, they revised them on the VX-2 to a 2 rod end link, as i like to point out, just like Alfa Romeo did in the first place, the drop links can go to extreme angles without binding, Colin.

LOL! Nissan used ball jointed links in the late 80s.