Recent Posts

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900 Series (Alfasud, Alfasud Sprint, 33) / Re: Sud Racer No Start
« Last post by Trikes on May 26, 2017, 08:02:16 PM »
Well I sent the list of what I needed but Amiche must have died or something.

Ready to shove this Alfa over a Cliff atm. Can't get parts atm.

I'll ring around a bit more........ very frustrating.
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932 Series (156, GTV, Spider, 147, GT, and 166) / Re: 166 fuel pump
« Last post by johnl on May 26, 2017, 04:35:49 PM »
Point taken Barry. I didn't expect that you didn't understand it, and that you were probably trying to keep it simple, but I suspect that this kind of simplification is often how misconceptions can begin, i.e. in this case that a product such as JB Weld somehow miraculously turns to contiguous metal when it cures, which of course it can't. Just trying to be clear.

A note about epoxies. There are a few different kinds with varying properties (don't ask, I'm not an expert on this). Using the wrong one in a given application can cause problems, an example would be Araldite which is a great glue, but one thing that it is not is water proof. Araldite will dissolve if soaked in water for any significant time, which is useful to know if the application involves water exposure, or you ever want to un-glue something that has been glued with it, i.e. just immerse it in water for a few days and it will come apart (worked for me a few times).

Regards,
John.
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932 Series (156, GTV, Spider, 147, GT, and 166) / Re: 166 fuel pump
« Last post by bazzbazz on May 26, 2017, 03:52:33 PM »
John, I try to speak in a manner and use terms that the layman and non technical minded can come to grasp with, we are not all gifted rocket scientists! ( Even though I ACTUALLY AM!)

Being RAAF trained and spending most of my life working on the most technically sophisticated hardware of the time, I have qualifications in Aviation, Electronic, Mechanical & Chemical Engineering, so trust me, if I wanted to baffle, confuse & bewilder the people I am trying to help I could do so to a degree they'd end up in a straight jacket.

As for JB Weld, here's direct from their web page -

Q/ How can I remove J-B Weld after it is fully cured?
A/ When fully cured, J-B Weld can only be removed by grinding or filing it off, or by directly heating the product above the
    600 maximum temperature threshold.

Q/  Is J-B Weld resistant to water and/or gasoline?
A/  When fully cured, J-B Weld is completely resistant to water, gasoline, and about every other petroleum product or
      automotive chemical.

Check Six

Baz
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General Discussion / Update
« Last post by ugame on May 26, 2017, 02:02:05 PM »
Just to update. We didn't get the numbers but stay tuned.

My mate wants to take another stab at getting this screened so I'll be helping him promote a future attempt.
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932 Series (156, GTV, Spider, 147, GT, and 166) / Re: 166 fuel pump
« Last post by johnl on May 26, 2017, 01:54:42 PM »

My understanding:
JB Weld (and similar 'filled' epoxies) is not metal based, but epoxy based with a metallic filler (powder) mixed into it. It doesn't become metal when it sets (if that's what you mean by "sets to metal"). It's still primarily a type of plastic, but harder and more abrasion resistant due to the embedded filler powder.

It doesn't adhere any more strongly than the unfilled epoxy base. Despite any higher hardness, tensile and shear strength probably won't be much if any different to that of the base epoxy. While it can be used to 'repair' metal objects, it should be kept in mind that the 'repair' will not be nearly as strong as the original metal, so it's usefulness is limited (sometimes useful, sometimes not, depending).

This isn't to say that it should be avoided. The increased hardness (over unfilled epoxy) can be a good thing. It tends to be less 'liquid' when still uncured, so tends to be more 'mouldable' than unfilled epoxy, and so can be more easily 'shaped' to fill gaps and provide strengthening thickness over something like a crack.

Last time I used it (filled epoxy) was to fill rough depressions on the end of a kart axle (corrosion damage on an axle that had been badly stored for a long time), for which purpose it has worked very well - keeping in mind that the location of the corrosion damage at the very end of the axle has no significant impact on the axle strength (but may have caused damage to the wheel hub if left rough).

I would say that the trick to fixing something like a fuel leak with epoxy is to make sure that the surfaces are very clean, and the surfaces roughened (sanded etc.) to provide a good physical 'key' for the epoxy to 'lock' into (a roughened surface will also effectively increase the surface area over a nominal area and so adhesion will be greater regardless of the 'key' effect). Building epoxy thickness over a crack will be a good thing, and a filled epoxy tends to help with this, though an epoxy putty may possibly be just as good...(?). 

Regards,
John.

the trick is you do not use normal Epoxy, you use JB Weld, it's a metal based Epoxy and sets to metal.
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Victoria / Exhaust for a 75 TS
« Last post by GTVeloce on May 26, 2017, 11:11:46 AM »
Hi guys

My exhaust has literally fallen off and I am in need of an urgent replacement. Does anyone know where I might find a good (looking for new) exhaust system for a 75 TS in Vic? Preferably a standard replacement although would be happy to pay a little extra for a SS system.

Failing this I will have to get something made.

Thanks
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Photos & Videos / Re: Giulia Quadrifoglio meets Audi S4 V8 on German Autobahn
« Last post by aggie57 on May 26, 2017, 10:20:57 AM »
Bonno, I'll point more to the lazy attitude of Australian drivers inhabiting the inside (in our Case, right) lane and not doing the speed limit as more of a danger.
With the distances we have to cover between cities and even from CBD to outskirts, our speed limits are unrealistically low and a cause of fatigue.
We need them raised!

Actually I don't think you do. Need them raised that is. The open road freeways in Australia are simply not engineered for the sorts of speeds being discussed here, or shown in the linked videos. There are far to many intersections and cross roads.  Example, the Hume north of Craigeburn or maybe Seymour.  All those interactions would need to be rebuilt to merge traffic smoothly rather than have vehicles enter from a standing start.

Not to say 120km/h or so isn't doable but even if it was that personally I'd be very cautious.
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Photos & Videos / Re: Giulia Quadrifoglio meets Audi S4 V8 on German Autobahn
« Last post by aggie57 on May 26, 2017, 10:20:17 AM »
Bonno, I'll point more to the lazy attitude of Australian drivers inhabiting the inside (in our Case, right) lane and not doing the speed limit as more of a danger.
With the distances we have to cover between cities and even from CBD to outskirts, our speed limits are unrealistically low and a cause of fatigue.
We need them raised!

Actually I don't think you do. Need them raised that is. The open road freeways in Australia are simply not engineered for the sorts of speeds being discussed here, or in the liked videos. There are far to many intersections and cross roads.  Example, the Hume north of Craigeburn or maybe Seymour.  All those interactions would need to be rebuilt to merge traffic smoothly rather than have vehicles enter from a standing start.

Not to say 120km/h or so isn't doable but even if it was that personally I'd be very cautious.
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General Discussion / Re: May 28th Drive to The Peninsula with Giulia
« Last post by Colin Edwards on May 26, 2017, 10:17:34 AM »
Hello Gary,

We're all sorted for this Sunday's drive.  Planned to give the 75 a run however the suspension is in bits.  The 159 will now be the weapon of choice.  3.2V6 standing in for the 3.0V6!


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