Alfa Romeo Owners Club of Australia Forum

Technical => 160 Series (90, 75, 164 Sedans) => Topic started by: shiny_car on July 05, 2011, 09:38:53 PM

Title: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [Updated 12 November 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on July 05, 2011, 09:38:53 PM
I thought I'd keep you guys posted of the (slow) work I'm doing on my 75. I bought this car in March, though have only just started the overhaul. In the past 4 months I've been buying new and used replacement parts (and also finished my Alfa 155, which was the main reason to defer the 75). The body is really straight, with only a handful of carpark dents, and a few small spots of surface rust. The interior is in great condition for one of these; perhaps the best I've seen in any that have been on the market (eg: no collapsed door arm rests, only a couple grab handles cracked; ARC fully functional). It's also low km's, at 135,000. But I don't think many of the original parts have ever been replaced (either haven't needed them, or previous owners disinterested). So a lot needs to be done, especially with what I have in mind for the car.

At the end of the project, I am aiming for a highly tuned (ie: performance upgrades), clean, and eye catching street car. No plans for track work, no plans for outrageous power, nothing garish. Just a car that hopefully, you will sit back, look at twice (or more!), and admire. I want to complete it in time for Spettacolo 2012.  8)

Stage I is the engine/engine bay. Lots to do here, so it will probably take a couple months, and still many parts to buy. Work will include:

-cosmetic:
*thorough clean/degrease
*respray/paint areas of surface rust and where paint has been stripped (brake and PS fluid damage)
*spray air plenum and cam covers
*new oil cap
*titanium Allen head bolts: to replace all visible bolts in the entire engine bay; a few will be stainless where Ti unavailable
*new hose clamps throughout: replace all visible clamps
*new cambelt cover
*new bonnet front edge rubber seal
*new clips for bonnet seal and bonnet liner

-electrical:
*upgrade groundwires
*upgrade main powerwires
*new covers over wiring looms
*replace split rubber boots
*replace damaged/poor terminals
*fit upgraded and refurbished alternator
*new deep cycle battery and terminals
*new ignition leads
*new distributor cap and rotor

-mechanical:
*new cambelt
*overhaul hydraulic (de)tensioner
*new 164QV camshafts
*new inlet/exhaust tappets and reshim
*new gaskets and camshaft seals (not replacing head gaskets as no evidence of failure)
*new belts for AC, waterpump-alternator, PS pump
*new silicone hoses for vacuum lines and air plenum
*new air filter pod and silicone hoses
*fresh oil and filter
*new rear engine mount
*new fuel filter
*new lambda oxygen sensor

-cooling:
*new waterpump
*new thermostat
*new radiator
*new fan thermoswitch and relay and troubleshoot why fan not kicking in
*new expansion bottle
*new silicone hoses
*flush then fresh coolant

-AC:
*troubleshoot why it's not working: could be electrical or mechanical and at least needs a regas; time to learn how AC works!

Phew, that's roughly it, plus a full 'tune up'. Full exhaust will be a separate thing. So far, there's probably over a couple thousand in parts for this stage alone, plus a lot of new workshop tools I've had to buy. But it should end up being one immaculate and bling engine bay!

Photos. To begin with, the front bumper, headlights and front grill were removed. A general degrease was performed a few weeks ago. It's amazing what 20 years+ of grime looks like!

(https://i.imgur.com/Ch87LRr.jpg)

Coolant was drained, and radiator and main hoses removed. This provides a lot more space to work with at the front.

(https://i.imgur.com/TpgE9WH.jpg)

It's worrying to think what gunge is circulating in the cooling system! I have purposely not flushed the system at this stage, because a lot of the crap is probably in the old radiator and hoses. Nearly all of it will be replaced - leaving only the engine block passages and interior heater matrix/hoses - so I will flush it once all the new parts are fitted. This was on the thermostat outlet:

(https://i.imgur.com/Snu39Zi.jpg)

Overhaul begins on the left/passenger side. The battery tray has surface rust:

(https://i.imgur.com/r4BnAA7.jpg)

The wiring loom has tatty coverings that will be spruced up:

(https://i.imgur.com/a4823Rt.jpg)

The thin wire connecting the NEG battery terminal to the chassis was loose, and simply pulled out! Not a reliable setup, and looks like 10awg (5.26mm^2 cross section). I will replace it with 0awg (53.5mm^2). The thicker wire is the engineblock-battery groundwire, which is the main wire in the OE setup, and looks like 0awg. I will replace this with new 0awg.

(https://i.imgur.com/aC8SL8D.jpg)

Next to the windscreen washer fluid bottle, is a black wiring terminal block (cover removed in these photos). This accepts the main wire from the alternator, only 8awg  (8.36mm^2) thick, before continuing onto the POS battery terminal, and a branch feeding the main wiring loom. The alternator wire will be upgraded to 4awg (21.1mm^2). There is an existing 4awg wire that goes from the POS terminal to the starter motor; this will be retained.

(https://i.imgur.com/HP2a5LW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7Hq0lNd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dwpHjId.jpg)

The wiring looms on this side were unplugged from all components and unclipped from the engine bay; then moved aside. The ignition coil, module, and bracket were also removed, and the washer fluid bottle. The belts and alternator were removed (passenger side engine mount required unbolting and entire engine jacked up a few centimeters to facilitate removal of the main alternator bolt), and the PS pump brackets removed and pump moved aside.

(https://i.imgur.com/Ndu6qHz.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/6876yNX.jpg)

After further degreasing on this side, the areas of stripped paintwork are now accessible for repainting. The area at the back is where brake fluid would have split; a previous owner removed the rear brake bias regulator, normally connected after the master cylinder. I presume brake fluid leaked during this procedure, and precautions not taken   ::) . The stripped paintwork nearer the front is under the PS pump, so I presume a hose had a leak at one stage or was replaced, again without proper care or clean-up.

(https://i.imgur.com/QdNXVFx.jpg)

Nice clean alloy found behind the grease and grime! Most of the engine block will be cleaned similarly.

(https://i.imgur.com/gkvrWcM.jpg)

That's it for now. Once the weather improves, I will paint the exposed metal with a rust-prevention primer. There's also patches under the radiator, as well as the battery tray. Once that has cured, I have a can of specially-mixed colour-matched Alfa Red to respray the areas. The paintwork that isn't damaged will be hand polished to a nice finish.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on July 05, 2011, 10:15:24 PM
Nice!!!  8)
Faster in red, too  ;D.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on July 06, 2011, 10:36:43 PM
nice work the posivite batt/ter not so posivite lol. Get new one from autopro I like mine $4.50 each, bloody awesome
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 10, 2011, 10:13:53 AM
Thanks guys.

I took the left manifold off, and there's more damaged paint right down to the PS crossmember. All fixable, but takes more prep and time.

I had better not tell about the wheels until they get fitted.  :D

 :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on July 11, 2011, 12:41:51 PM
One way to greatly improve a 3lt 75 is to up the spring rate a little, your ride quality we still be excellent, (in my opinion better) with some good quality shocks to go with it, by doing this you can lower the car safely for that look you want and improve the dynamic handling out of sight. :) :) :)

I would also like to suggest front suspension geometry changes like long shank top ball joints or drop spindles as well as more caster angle. The improvement in turn in and front end grip is very inspiring and goes along way to making the car a lot more agile.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: tanakt on July 12, 2011, 09:19:26 AM
Great post! I can't wait to see the next installment and it also gives me plenty of information about my own 75... Thanks!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Davidm1600 on July 12, 2011, 04:01:28 PM
One thing I would do, is don't wait until the weather gets better to treat any bare metal or rusted and cleaned up sections. I would get on and treat such areas ASAP. If you wait and the weather is crap, it is only going to rust again. 

The other thing is are you going to repaint in the engine bay with the engine in place or remove it plus the wiring and plumbing, in the end it might be easier to remove all items from the engine bay and re-paint it properly.   Just a thought.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 12, 2011, 06:29:33 PM
Cheers guys. Thanks for the comments and tips. :)

I am pushing on, and today continued to clean up the left side of the engine bay where most of the paint damage is. Yeah, trying to complete the painting ASAP; virtually all the preparation is now done, so this week I can apply some rust proofer/primer.

I decided against removing the engine. One reason being I don't have an engine hoist (though of course I could buy one), the time/work involved (all do-able I suppose), but I think I can achieve what's required without doing it. Though agreed, once out, it would be easier! Overall, the 'difficulty' vs 'required repainting' lies in favour of doing things in situ.

I would also like to suggest front suspension geometry changes like long shank top ball joints or drop spindles as well as more caster angle. The improvement in turn in and front end grip is very inspiring and goes along way to making the car a lot more agile.

Interesting ideas. I've read about drop spindles, but I don't know what long shank ball joints are, or how they'd assist.

However, I will be fitting the RS Racing coilovers at the front. These are apparently designed to fit the standard suspension components, and don't suit drop spindles so well from what I've read. At the end of the day, the compromise I will take is 'low', coilovers, no drop spindles. I accept that geometry may not be perfect, but it should be fine for a street car.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on August 05, 2011, 04:58:41 PM
August-update for work on the car. I've managed to do a reasonable amount of work in the engine bay, but really still only beginning the ground work!

Left-bank exhaust manifold was removed to increase access to the area beside the engine (only one nut securing the front pipe was really stuck by corrosion; Inox penetrating oil (you can notice the overspray) cured the problem). Full extent of the paint damage becomes obvious, but not a big deal, as it's all superficial:

(https://i.imgur.com/35NtPV2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LilWDue.jpg)

All the areas of rust were carefully cleaned, sanded, and prepped for painting. Old newspaper and (cooking) aluminium foil protected areas against paint. 3M Cold Gal Primer was used for the base coat:

(https://i.imgur.com/D35rDfH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VOfPU8r.jpg)

Next task, I cleaned up the slam panel, by removing old decals, then machine-polishing the paint. One section of peeling paint was sanded back and requires respraying, which I will do in the future.

(https://i.imgur.com/F8vA8Jn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/bJ5ggSd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yEDBexc.jpg)

I also cleaned the bonnet lock and polished it using a kit from Bunnings, that works well for small parts like this. It will be sprayed with clear-coat to protect against corrosion. Notice the new Allen-head titanium bolts securing the lock; similar bolts will be used throughout the engine bay:

(https://i.imgur.com/TSPM5PM.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mG23mM3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/D0d1E0q.jpg)

The right-side of the engine bay was stripped of parts, beginning with the air filter box, to access the paintwork, for cleaning and repairs. Wiring looms will be cleaned and tidied-up. Notice the hotch-potch of hose clamps, different styles and some longer than required; these will all be replaced.

(https://i.imgur.com/Y7aMvsh.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tiUXvdX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LWERS1z.jpg)

The air filter box is gone, as is the small plastic coolant expansion tank, and right-bank exhaust manifold removed. Heat from the manifold has presumably damaged the paintwork, and also caused cracking of the engine mount, so this will be replaced:

(https://i.imgur.com/ixP39EY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/x0ukTGR.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HSYGkgN.jpg)

Timing belt covers removed. The hydraulic detensioner is weaping oil, which is expected over time, and will be rebuilt with new seals; I found the rubber boot covering the little piston had detached, exposing the piston to grime. Whilst some of you would replace the detensioner with a simpler spring-loaded mechanical tensioner, it's not as elegant, and some have failed.

(https://i.imgur.com/4lUEYUA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/TCx7wDo.jpg)

The AC compressor was unbolted from its bracket, for cleaning and improved access to that area. Accessing these bolts wasn't much fun (tight bolts, grimey area):

(https://i.imgur.com/KPBML4q.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JsHHr6B.jpg)

Finally, I found the electrical plugs to the AC receiver-dryer are connected as shown, which is presumably 'reversed'. The AC currently does not work, and I am yet to determine if this is an electrical or component or gas fault, but can anyone explain why my plugs might be connected in reverse?

(https://i.imgur.com/yHyDBwU.jpg)

Hopefully by next month, repainting the engine bay will be completed, and I can start sprucing up the wiring looms, then start on the engine mechanicals, like water pump, timing belt, and camshafts.

Thanks for looking!   :D

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on August 11, 2011, 05:59:04 PM
I see that it's all well in hand  ;) looks very good  :)I have just made a brace (strat brace) but 75 not have strats so  :-\ :-\
well its functional and now I am making 6x9's fit the rear parcle shelf . ;D

Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 04, 2011, 06:24:28 PM
Cheers alphie75. :)

September update!

Birthday present from my wife: car shelter; now the car has a clean, dry place to live, and I can do work even if it's raining! And because I enjoy building such things, it was fun to put together.

(https://i.imgur.com/wB36op1.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/WqDUbpa.jpg)

Three different areas being worked on simultaneously:
1. repainting engine bay completed
2. modifying chassis to fit Euro style bumpers
3. respraying section of slam panel and mount for bonnet rod clip

Right side of engine bay degreased and cleaned up. Areas of paint damage and exposed metal coated with primer.

(https://i.imgur.com/wmDbWci.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/kh5QkCJ.jpg)

Engine bay painted Alfa Rosso 130 (original colour) using simple brush and roller. The roller created a slight texture, which looks good.

(https://i.imgur.com/7loyLTu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sW42njy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ds3Kxvl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KuRuofZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GeQcocp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4eQn897.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/wIxvH57.jpg)

Original 'America' bumpers are fussy and heavy. They have shock absorbing 'pistons' that mount onto steel box sections attached to the chassis.

(https://i.imgur.com/kJgZXBe.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OvM9jcb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/psRcja7.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LXkAEmD.jpg)

The box sections hide factory holes and nuts that secure bumper brackets for the 'Euro' bumpers. The nuts are welded in position, and visible from the engine bay.

(https://i.imgur.com/6NPekNm.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ly7cdQG.jpg)

My car will be converted to Euro bumpers, so the box sections needed removal. I discovered they are mounted by multiple spot welds, plus a very solid seam weld at the rear of each box. The left side was first to go; I started using a hand-held saw with hacksaw blade, and crow bar. I drilled through some of the spot welds from inside the engine bay. Attempting to saw through the main rear weld was proving impossible. Good excuse for a new power tool! So I bought a Makita reciprocating saw, and completed the final cut within minutes. The awkward access and angle, meant I could not cut straight through the weld, but cut a crescent of metal out of the box section; no big deal.

(https://i.imgur.com/OJCcwbE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/8XOlDOA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tGDSfTt.jpg)

Removing the right side box section was quicker, but I still managed to butcher the underlying the chassis slightly. Once cleaned and painted, it will be fine.

(https://i.imgur.com/U1tEle7.jpg)

Trial fitment of Euro bumper bracket on the left side, bolted through to the existing welded nuts.

(https://i.imgur.com/8NqxyuW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NjKpZcv.jpg)

Each side cleaned, and painted with primer.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZmxxDv0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xbrVZcn.jpg)

Slam panel and bonnet rod clip mount masked, ready for respraying.

(https://i.imgur.com/QJJhSbs.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OW7LH4e.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/oOZfvU8.jpg)

Each section sprayed with aerosol Alfa Rosso 130.

(https://i.imgur.com/EyGbTAa.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qJHwP0w.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/uFhgNMV.jpg)

That's it for now. Next up, I will gently sand the resprayed sections, then spray with clear coat, then machine-polish. The chassis areas for the bumper brackets will be painted, and I will hopefully make a start on the engine mechanics once a few more parts arrive from overseas.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: johnnyc on October 04, 2011, 09:17:46 PM
shiny, any movement???
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 05, 2011, 12:16:43 AM
Hey johnnyc. Yes, a bit of progress. I am due for the October update, which I will endeavour to post before the weekend is over.

Thanks for asking. :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Anthony Miller on October 05, 2011, 11:05:06 AM
Hey Richard, where did you get, or are going to get, the veloce bumpers from?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 05, 2011, 11:22:38 AM
Hey Anthony

I'm not going with Veloce bumpers, I'm going with Twin Spark bumpers. Sorry if the labelling in the pics is confusing; it's because I cross-post some of the photos in other forums incl alfabb.com.

However, if I wanted a Veloce kit/bumpers, I recommend contacting Vlade at Arese Spares in Sydney. I believe he can supply genuine UK used kits, and he freights for reasonable cost.

I have deliberated a lot over the bumpers: original America bumpers vs Twin Spark vs Veloce/Evolutione kit. IMO, the original bumpers are too fussy looking, and heavy. I love the look of the Veloce kit, however I think it's a little too aggressive for my liking and a little bit too 'tarty'; kinda like seeing an HDT VL Commodore. It makes the Commodore look a lot tougher, and in its day it stood out, but these days it's a little OTT. The other thing that turns me off is that it's fibreglass, and therefore would crack and sustain bad damage if it was hit. Mind you, what I do have in mind is adding a splitter to the front bumper, and I presume the one I want is fibreglass! But at least that's just one piece that will be fibreglass, and I might even buy two splitters to have one spare.

You can send Vlade an email. He shows the kits on his website: http://www.aresespares.com.au/2nd%20hand%20stuff.html
I am buying a Recaro interior from him, and he's great to deal with, and I know other Alfisti that speak very favourably of his service.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on October 05, 2011, 09:02:20 PM
shiny car
I am in need of a front bumper will you consider selling yours?

regards

ps have also sent a pm
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 05, 2011, 09:30:16 PM
PM replied - can sell.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 06, 2011, 07:21:38 PM
October update. :)

I'm still working on multiple little jobs at the same time, so not much is actually completed!

Patched up holes in the chassis where the original box section bumper mounts were sawn off, using JB Weld. First time I've used this stuff, and it certainly sets rock hard! Then I painted the front section with 3M paint-on Body Deadener.

(https://i.imgur.com/t8v3drH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NI3r3WW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/cAKbEMJ.jpg)

The resprayed slam panel section and clip mount are nearly finished. The 'orange peel' effect has been sanded with 800 then 1500 grade wet&dry sandpaper. It now needs machine polishing, which I'll show next month.

(https://i.imgur.com/Pn4RadE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DbE0UaH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/fmwxxLS.jpg)

The underside of the bonnet has been cleaned up. I have a new rubber strip and clips for the front edge, and new latch; these will be fitted in the future after the top surface has been resprayed. I will also refit the black sound deadening piece.

(https://i.imgur.com/yRqEwWV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/AfVRXWA.jpg)

The crank pulley needed sprucing-up, so I masked it off and sprayed with aluminium (colour) heat-tolerant paint.

(https://i.imgur.com/5ytLvqo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/bvCW0EL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/50uyda4.jpg)

The black mounting bracket was a little scratched, so this was masked and resprayed with satin black paint.

(https://i.imgur.com/CqYP6ID.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5kctFoj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/73DSNfD.jpg)

My car was lacking a rear brake load proportioning valve; possibly removed because it failed. Without the valve, the rear brakes lock up before the front brakes. I bought a cheap used replacement together with the short joining pipes, then decided to buy a brand new valve to ensure reliability. Prior to fitment, I've resprayed the master cylinder and servo, and sprayed the proportioning valve and bracket black. They will be fitted in time for next month's update.

(https://i.imgur.com/6zWpJRL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jm1oSyJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ywr7LkM.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/CUPV39c.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sWkfhkF.jpg)

The air intake plenum has been removed, together with ignition leads and oil vapour separator.

(https://i.imgur.com/0OwXir2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PUThviE.jpg)

And here's all the new engine parts to be fitted!

(https://i.imgur.com/sxaTRDH.jpg)

K&N air filter kit with silicone intake pipes (hiperformancestore.com, US), oxygen sensor, oil filter.

(https://i.imgur.com/GKkvkDI.jpg)

A lot of titanium Allen-key head bolts; these will replace every visible bolt in the engine bay! Purely a cosmetic upgrade.

(https://i.imgur.com/FKwKhsf.jpg)

Plastic cambelt cover pieces (haven't found a new left-side one though), cambelt and other belts, spark plugs, waterpump, thermostat, and rebuild kit (O-rings, etc) for the hydraulic (de)tensioner (alfissimo.com, US).

(https://i.imgur.com/Pi4RcO3.jpg)

Silicone radiator hoses (highperformancestore.com, US), aluminium radiator (alfissimo.com, US), 164S cams (unused, from an incomplete project in the UK), gasket set.

(https://i.imgur.com/9UCIxNj.jpg)

Ignition leads, altitude sensor, distributor cap + rotor, inlet + exhaust tappets, Bosch-plug rubber boots.

(https://i.imgur.com/Incmvcd.jpg)

Coolant expansion bottle, stainless hose clamps, silicone coolant + vacuum hoses (hiperformancestore.com, US), bonnet latch, fuel injectors (hiperformancestore.com, US), fuel pressure regulator, oil pressure sender, silicone plenum pipes (International Auto Parts, US).

(https://i.imgur.com/PKf8qxP.jpg)

So, plenty of work to do in the engine bay.  :-\

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on October 06, 2011, 08:44:50 PM
Wow, man . :o
nice stuff = lots of work .
Where did you get your S cams mate
























Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 06, 2011, 08:58:09 PM
I figured: old car = replace what I can to ensure it's reliable, and bling it up!

Where did you get your S cams mate

A nice chap in the UK sold them to me. I found him on the alfaowner.com forums, and I first bought a front 27mm antiroll bar off him. He then offered the cams, which were going to be fitted into his brother's 75, but they decided not to finish off that project. So they are unused, and were cheap (well under half the normal cost, delivered, so I couldn't say no)!

I realise they might only bring 3-5kW of top-end power, but the engine will benefit from having fresh parts including the tappets.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ANG156 on October 06, 2011, 09:05:06 PM
Whats the plan for the cam covers and plenum? Where did you source most of the parts from? Ebay/Forums in Europe/America?

You might want to conider these guys for rubbers when it comes time to replace them
http://www.cicognaniguarnizioni.it/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=305%3Aalfa-90-75&catid=9%3Aalfa-romeo&Itemid=13&lang=en
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 06, 2011, 10:39:27 PM
Whats the plan for the cam covers and plenum? Where did you source most of the parts from? Ebay/Forums in Europe/America?

A combination of all: ebay (mostly overseas), EB Spares (UK), hiperformancestore/International Auto Parts/Centerline/alfissimo (US)...so far.

Cam covers and plenum will be sprayed with black wrinkle paint, with the raised lettering/ribs sanded back to bare aluminium.

Quote
You might want to conider these guys for rubbers when it comes time to replace them
http://www.cicognaniguarnizioni.it/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=305%3Aalfa-90-75&catid=9%3Aalfa-romeo&Itemid=13&lang=en

Thanks for the link - might be handy. I continue to find more parts to replace as I go along. Have you bought from them before - would be reassuring to hear positive feedback.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: johnnyc on October 07, 2011, 03:52:00 PM
shiny, nice work.

your thread is very interesting as I expect i will need to do the same to my car down the track.

according to alfa records my car (also 3.0 v6 75) was built april 1989 and sold here in June 1990.

the "american bumpers" you refer to are the "accordion" style??
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 07, 2011, 04:48:17 PM
Ah, yours is built only a month after mine; my 'plate' states March 1989 build date.  8)

Yes, the 'America' bumpers are the accordian versions, as fitted to the 3.0 models. They are quite heavy, but presumably offer better crash protection. The styling is 'fussy' IMO, and I prefer the simpler lines of the TS/2.5 bumpers.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ANG156 on October 07, 2011, 06:56:23 PM
Whats the plan for the cam covers and plenum? Where did you source most of the parts from? Ebay/Forums in Europe/America?

Quote
You might want to conider these guys for rubbers when it comes time to replace them
http://www.cicognaniguarnizioni.it/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=305%3Aalfa-90-75&catid=9%3Aalfa-romeo&Itemid=13&lang=en

Thanks for the link - might be handy. I continue to find more parts to replace as I go along. Have you bought from them before - would be reassuring to hear positive feedback.


Nah i havn't! I just found the link last week from some guy on the BB forum looking at buying door rubbers for his 105coupe. I have emailed them about the 75 door handle rubbers since it seems 24euro is rather cheap compared to the repro's made by the other ebay poster from the bb forum.

EDIT Just got an email back from them and it seems they want an additional 60euro to send to australia. What a joke!!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: 1969read on November 01, 2011, 10:57:49 AM
If your selling the rear bottom bumper piece, under the main bumper please Pm me a price Thankyou Jason
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on November 05, 2011, 06:40:25 PM
Ok, November update!

I spent a week of my spare time detailing the GT for Spettacolo, so that's my excuse for not achieving much on the 75!  ;D

The brake proportioning valve was fitted. The mounting bracket accommodates a 6mm bolt, but the proportioning valve has a hole for an 8mm bolt. I've used a titanium Allen-head bolt and 'thickened' the shaft using a couple layers of heatshrink tubing, resulting in a snug fit inside the 8mm hole.

(https://i.imgur.com/dkrUyGR.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7ZHnTnc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YpGPl8b.jpg)

The fuel rail was removed, and all the fuel injectors and fuel pressure regulator replaced for brand new ones. The mounting hardware for each injector was re-used, including the mounting flange, rubber gasket and circlip.

(https://i.imgur.com/JLhUygc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/oB0BUhG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/r4D3tT1.jpg)

One of the new injectors was not anodised black like the others (for no obvious reason), so this was resprayed to match, along with the original cold start injector. The flanges were cleaned and sprayed aluminium. The mounting hardware was fitted to the new injectors, then the fuel rail was reassembled together with the new pressure regulator.

(https://i.imgur.com/peVTZrz.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rxA48l0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/uFFb7Et.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DDVn6yp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/gJ5AmGv.jpg)

With the fuel rail off, there was access to the 'V' between the cylinder heads for cleaning. The intake stub pipes were removed, and the oily carbon deposits cleaned away.

(https://i.imgur.com/aF6oLcy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KpYvQzX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/MeePgv9.jpg)

Nice and clean.

(https://i.imgur.com/y315Dpw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/llCJX1Q.jpg)

And definitely the opportunity to replace the oil pressure sender, which is otherwise difficult to access, right at the back of the V. With inadequate room for even a stubby spanner, vice grips easily helped unscrew the old sender and fit the new one.

(https://i.imgur.com/TaWfbOl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GDF4zsu.jpg)

The refurbished fuel rail was refitted, including titanium bolts to secure the injector flanges, and new stainless hose clamps.

(https://i.imgur.com/zJHejil.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/r8itlWg.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KdIdTBd.jpg)

A few of the injector plug rubber boots were brittle and cracked, so these have been replaced with new, by first removing the plugs.

(https://i.imgur.com/1rBxEJ8.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/09Pl7d8.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/s40InxF.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rc9SmqQ.jpg)

The injector wiring loom was cleaned and all plugs refitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/tRCBEhr.jpg)

And finally, the slam panel is completed, after machine-polishing the area that was resprayed and sanded.

(https://i.imgur.com/bAFQIO6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Za2pbfY.jpg)

That's it for this month. Hopefully I have more time for the car in the coming weeks.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on November 05, 2011, 08:41:07 PM
shiny car
I have just done my injectors and fuel rail...................I should have used the titanium bolts like you have
they look great.

good job........It will be interesting to see which one of us finishes first

great to catch up with you at spettacolo
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on November 05, 2011, 08:50:00 PM
Cheers gergory. Spettacolo was good, and was definitely nice to catch up.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on November 06, 2011, 10:48:15 AM
shiny_car  I thought my car was costing me a lot  :obut you have take the cake ( good on you)mate  :)
 my bumpers cost me about with paniting in 2pak 130 red $2500 Went finished . :'(
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on November 10, 2011, 05:35:14 PM
Even though you've put things back together, I thought I'd mention that the inlet runners on my V6 were of very poor internal quality, having some pretty decent port misalignment (strangely, it was from excessive material in the runners). From memory, the bakalight spacers had good consistent finish  and alignment amongst the 6 of them and also with the head ports. So I match ported each runner with the bakalight spacers and generally smoothed (not to smooth) the runners and 'nipples' (couldn't think of any other description  :P) on the plenum chamber so they were pretty consistent 38mm.

The 'Butt Dyno' said better performance  8)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Sheldon McIntosh on November 10, 2011, 06:35:56 PM
You bought a Butt Dyno too?  They're worth every penny in my opinion.  http://kalecoauto.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=41 (http://kalecoauto.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=41)

My inlet runners were pretty good, maybe a PO had already looked at them?  Shame he didn't do the same for the extractors, they were appalling, I spent hours smoothing those welds out (and then rewelding the holes where I went too far...oops).
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on November 10, 2011, 08:39:34 PM
You bought a Butt Dyno too?  They're worth every penny in my opinion.  http://kalecoauto.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=41 (http://kalecoauto.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=41)

Yep, I bought it to set the tension on the adjustable power band that I put on my skate board yeearrs ago.
It doesn't work with my MR2 or Silvia, though. I emailed the manufacturer and they said that Japanese power is different to American and European power. Apparently there is a conversion kit, but I never bothered to look for it. I'll probably just permanently install it in my 75, it should triple the value of the car, so it'll be worth it............





 ;D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on November 11, 2011, 01:11:16 AM
Cheers for the suggestion Duk. Unfortunately I don't have ready-access to the facilities to do any grinding and porting (unless a Dremel counts!). So I'll keep it simple, and continue to chase reliability ahead of power output. But it makes good sense, especially with a boosted engine like you plan.

shiny_car  I thought my car was costing me a lot  :obut you have take the cake ( good on you)mate  :)
 my bumpers cost me about with paniting in 2pak 130 red $2500 Went finished . :'(

Thanks alphie. You'd expect a good quality paint job for the money you paid!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on December 04, 2011, 02:35:12 AM
Update for this month: main work has been related to the camshafts and changing the cambelt.

Distributor removed for cleaning, and R-side of engine block cleaned up:

(https://i.imgur.com/J5P2YO4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xINhWaH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vq9oyu3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/RVf7h9i.jpg)

Old cambelt removed, then cam pulleys, distributor/oil pump pulley, detensioner, and waterpump with thermostat group:

(https://i.imgur.com/2Ct1Ttb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9PiNDNK.jpg)

Cam pulley tools bought from TotallyAlfa (http://www.totallyalfa.com/index.cfm). The tools are replicas of original factory versions, well made, and well worth the money for this job.

(https://i.imgur.com/0N39J7P.jpg)

Unbolting the main retaining nut:

(https://i.imgur.com/QbtZSmP.jpg)

Extracting the pulley hub:

(https://i.imgur.com/c0ppdrm.jpg)

Water pump and thermostat assembly removed:

(https://i.imgur.com/YbjJrkZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2YBzJyt.jpg)

Front of engine cleaned:

(https://i.imgur.com/CxROyKk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dGftuik.jpg)

3 pieces make up the thermostat group: thermostat in its housing + sensor housing + connector to waterpump. These were disassembled for cleaning; polishing (Dremel + wire brush attachments) cleaned the surfaces but the finish was not nice and even, so I decided to respray them.

(https://i.imgur.com/Djd73zO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/MXyyxxl.jpg)

3 senders/sensors: thermo time switch + coolant temp sensor (for Bosch ECU) + coolant temp sender (for dash gauge and warning light). These were removed and the brass fittings polished. The thermo time switch tested as faulty, so a picked up a secondhand replacement, courtesy of Monza Motors.

(https://i.imgur.com/uoFFRjr.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VPWWxbY.jpg)

I noticed the bare metal centre of the old waterpump pulley was corroded, so I decided to respray the centre of the new waterpump for protection. Masked and lightly sanded in preparation. The old waterpump had perished seals.

(https://i.imgur.com/BS0jNLA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ry3fqqr.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/A52RauF.jpg)

The thermostat group was reassembled with new gaskets, smears of sealant, and new bolts. A small cut-out in the gasket for the air-bleed hole was in the wrong position, so a new cut-out was formed.

(https://i.imgur.com/tlccPfV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/odUmcQV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SdPP1Er.jpg)

Detensioner was disassembled for a rebuild using a kit supplied with new seals and parts, from Alfissimo (http://www.alfissimo.com/).

(https://i.imgur.com/eyPFxwu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/zJ9XTHN.jpg)

I used a vice (I will buy a proper hydraulic press at some stage!) to press out the metal piece holding the piston seal, which was replaced. Then pressed the piece back into the main housing.

(https://i.imgur.com/w17EnRv.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/N9AeZo6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/pzr2Obk.jpg)

A new bearing was fitted. First, the central piece holding the bearing was pressed out from the old bearing, then pressed into the new bearing.

(https://i.imgur.com/CQFOjbj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/TlZdouv.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/oHCb99F.jpg)

Piston and spring refitted, with new gasket. New protective rubber bellows fitted over exposed shaft of piston.

(https://i.imgur.com/yIQcKlD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ihwedFI.jpg)

Bearing refitted. Bracket bolted onto bearing holder. The bearing pivots according to the forces applied from the cambelt and piston.

(https://i.imgur.com/7TePdWv.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5fQYBP9.jpg)

Next, onto the camshafts. The camcovers were removed, and oil sludge cleaned out.

(https://i.imgur.com/JRfiFqE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7BqDUyR.jpg)

Camshaft caps removed. 4 secure each camshaft; their order labelled with a stamped number

(https://i.imgur.com/voQ9j06.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NWFGyrs.jpg)

Out of curiosity, I measured the valve tappet clearances between the original camshafts and tappets.

(https://i.imgur.com/oLkQIx6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/P2Kl4C6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7bMuBv0.jpg)

The original L-head valve tappet parts (cylinders 4-6), which looked in good condition. Regardless, all the tappets are being replaced with new ones, because new camshafts are being fitted. New camshafts and tappets means new shims are (nearly always) required to achieve the desired clearance. The exhaust valve tappets have adjustable rods instead of shims, so clearances are easy to set and adjust.

(https://i.imgur.com/c6jpICh.jpg)

The old camshaft oil seals were removed and replaced with new.

(https://i.imgur.com/WXqKsXn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sOBkCMf.jpg)

New camshafts: these are slightly 'hotter' profiles for increased valve lift and duration, though still relatively 'mild' in the scheme of things. They are standard cams for the US-spec Alfa Romeo 164S (?equivalent of the Euro/Aus-spec 164Q); thus referred to as 'S-cams'...or scams   ;) because of their normally-high cost and marginal improvement in performance. I bought these cheaply from the UK, from an unfinished project, making them decent value. New intake and exhaust tappets to go along with the new camshafts. Plus Scorpion 'Cam & Lifter Installation Lubricant', which is meant to be a formula rich in ZDDP (zinc dialkyldithiophosphate).

(https://i.imgur.com/zJBoFnv.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/hCANoDX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/TJeKafw.jpg)

The new camshafts and intake tappets were trial-fitted using the original shims. Then the clearances were measured and compared with factory-spec (aiming for 0.018" / 0.46mm). Only cylinder 4 shim remained suitable; the other five cylinders had gaps either too large or small. Measuring the thickness of the original shims determined the thickness of the new shims. Again, at Monza Motors, Hugh Harrison measured my shims and supplied new ones.

(https://i.imgur.com/nEdOCnJ.jpg)

Shims, tappets, and camshaft fitted into L-head, and intake valve tappet clearances all rechecked to confirm the desired clearances were achieved.

(https://i.imgur.com/TrVGNcP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2bnXDgb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SZCKqVQ.jpg)

Once confirmed, the L-head camshaft was again removed, and the new exhaust tappets fitted, and cam lubricant applied. Then refitted the camshaft for the final time, and the cam pulley.

(https://i.imgur.com/sao2udv.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OtLZ4dh.jpg)

Cam pulley and hub were cleaned and refitted with a new O-ring seal. Only after cleaning the hub did I find the timing notch I'd read about, which was disguised amongst grime and corrosion. There are also timing marks for the L-head on the #7 cap and camshaft.

(https://i.imgur.com/u0uTwDs.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/TimxHf7.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/M0dBNw5.jpg)

Whilst working on the camshafts, I cleaned the cam covers, intake plenum, and partly-disassembled throttle body. These were painted with VHT Wrinkle Plus black spray paint. Once touch-dry, I oven-baked them for an hour at about 90 degrees celsius to help cure the paint and tighten the wrinkles.

(https://i.imgur.com/XWfxB7D.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JjjVrZD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/b7uMbv1.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ouDlsKo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/kQBNMMP.jpg)

That's it for now! December is busy, but I anticipate finishing off the camshaft in the R head, and finishing the cam covers/plenum by sanding back the raised fins and lettering, so I will show these details next month.

Thanks for looking.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on December 04, 2011, 09:14:41 AM
hi shiny ,
nice work with your cams ,you are a braver man than me .
I found this site you mite like all about 75 ,s
http://jeekaa.blogspot.com/2009_02_01_archive.html
Please let me know wot you think.cheers
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on December 04, 2011, 05:22:46 PM
hey richard
very impressive, I admire your bravery to do the intake valves...............I paid a fortune to have mine done

will look forward to the finished project
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: stustustu123 on December 05, 2011, 11:47:27 PM
Yes, as mentioned above, great work!  I also admire your efforts on replacing the intake shims & like Gergory paid someone to do mine too.  Did the timing belt tensioner bearing come off the holder ok in the vice?  Those bearings are a bit of fun to chase up these days too.  Totally admire your effort and attention to detail.   ;D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on December 06, 2011, 05:42:01 PM
Thanks guys. I'm learning a lot about engines as I go along, which is rewarding. Doing the intake shims is no big deal, if you have the time, workshop manual, and tools; and the help of Hugh Harrison to measure 'old' and supply the 'new'.

@ stustustu123: the bearing-holder pressed out and in easily. I had a UK Alfista also ask about sourcing the bearing. I believe they are the same as the 164 versions (and presumably other Alfa tensioners). Alfissimo supplied mine.
http://www.alfissimo.com/index.php?productID=683

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: bteoh on December 07, 2011, 07:29:27 PM
Hi shiny car,
How did you determine your ecu thermo sender was faulty? Did you stick it into a boiling pot and measure resistance?
I am trying to cure an erratic idle on my 75 3.0 potenziata , most noticeable when cold.....
Cheers
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on December 07, 2011, 08:46:41 PM
Yes, though I'm actually not so sure now!

According to Greg Gordon's tuning article (http://www.hiperformancestore.com/Ljetronic.htm), Step 4, the TTS should measure around 0ohm when cold, and increase to over 100ohm when hot (the threshold is around 35 deg C).

I used my multimeter, and dunked it into hot water. However, my readings have been around 30ohm increasing to around 65ohm, for the original and the secondhand spare I picked up. What are the chances both are faulty and provide similar readings?

So the acid test will be trying it in the car, once my engine is back together. I'll first check that the cold starter injector squirts when the engine is cold, and check that it doesn't squirt when it's hot.

I also found some useful info in this thread from alfabb.com : http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/milano-75-1987-1989/31563-cold-start-injector-wiring.html
It also suggests that a digital multimeter like what I have may not be giving the appropriate readings. Dunno.

Erratic idle probably isn't related to the TTS. But there's other tips in that article that should help you.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Anthony Miller on December 08, 2011, 10:37:16 AM
If the thermo sensor is faulty the ecu will run at full rich, making it an absolute bicth to start and when you do eventually get it going it will blow thick blueish white smoke and will not idle at all.

Richard, this thread of yours kicks arse, keep those updates coming, your pictures and lables rock and are a great help for any one with a 3.0l 75, cheers mate
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on January 06, 2012, 07:00:06 PM
Thanks Anthony. I'm glad some people are enjoying the progress.  :)

Update for work during December: unfortunately, busy month with Christmas and stuff, so I didn't have much opportunity to do much.

The detensioner has been refitted, and the cambelt is ready to be fitted (job for this month). Also refitted the thermostat group + waterpump, including new silicone pipes. Cam covers and plenum have been sanded back for the contrasting black-aluminium finish.

New O-rings for the oil-feed pipe and oil-return hole for the detensioner; these parts were from the rebuild kit. Then slid the detensioner back in position and completed the fitment with the reaction spring. There is meant to be an official Alfa tool to hold the spring-loaded bearing back, to aide fitment onto the engine block, and fitment of the cambelt; an Allen key does the job ok!

(https://i.imgur.com/gxrDRhv.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ggoCqmr.jpg)

Coolant that flows from the waterpump through the cylinder heads returns to the thermostat group via short pipes. In the 3.0 (compared with the 2.5 V6), the right-side pipe steps up in diameter to join the thermostat group. So the R and L pipes are different; unsure of the merit behind this. As part of the pipe/hose upgrades throughout the engine bay, the original rubber pipes were replaced with nice silicone ones (from Greg Gordon, hiperformancestore.com, US). He also includes some grease to help slide the tight hoses onto the inlets/outlets. New stainless hose clamps complete the fitment.

(https://i.imgur.com/8gfo0af.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/o0B09QF.jpg)

The water pump was bolted to the engine block using titanium bolts. New gasket was used, smeared with compatible silicone. Thermostat group bolted to the pump with a new gasket, and silicone pipes clamped to the engine coolant outlets.

(https://i.imgur.com/fc9kxDf.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/EfPgZ5U.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/oigOOWO.jpg)

Plenum and cam covers were masked around the edges to prevent accidental sanding. The raised ribs and alphanumerics were sanded back to raw aluminium, and are now ready for fitment.

(https://i.imgur.com/QshDrFM.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mPqhbep.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/cpewdw8.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ppkTCYw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5Mssjlb.jpg)

From here-on in, it's pretty much reassembly of all the pieces I've removed along the way. Most parts will need cleaning/polishing along the way, and refurbing the wiring will be a big job...but fun!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on January 07, 2012, 09:55:26 PM
Cheers mate. Not bad for a novice, eh?  :D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on March 05, 2012, 12:44:09 PM
It's been 2 months since an update. Reason being, I had no time to touch the car during January, so there was nothing to show! However, I managed a few days work in Feb and made some decent progress. The engine is starting to be pieced back together now!

New cambelt fitted. I used a screwdriver in cylinder #1 to confirm that TDC (top dead centre) was as-marked on the crank pulley. 41mm socket wrench required to turn the crank over. Lining everything up properly for correct timing was a little tricky, and 'walking' the belt over all the pulleys required a few goes. Detensioner locked into position once belt was fitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/X37oJX0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/aDee5vl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KlVEksc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/oYKMg4l.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/aKgpOmD.jpg)

I fitted 6 new NGK BP6ES spark plugs. Interestingly, 4 existing plugs were the same model and looked in good condition, presumably changed fairly recently; but 2 were Golden Lodge 2HL, and possibly the original plugs! I was chuffed that I finally found a use for the spark plug socket piece in my wrench set; I'd never used it before because other plugs were smaller diameter. And I'd read about requiring a 'thin walled' socket that fits down the spark plug wells in the engine; this worked fine.

(https://i.imgur.com/fJioA2N.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mzvGvfW.jpg)

New gaskets were fitted, sandwiched between the camshaft covers and heads, including 6 round ones atop the spark plug wells. Then the covers were bolted in position using titanium M7x25 Allen head bolts. A modern-look oil filler cap replaces the original.

(https://i.imgur.com/iLUPbCz.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/91H1NiG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/gNR7iCV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/03LYPyK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tvZVPvK.jpg)

The cleaned distributor was refitted, with attention to timing position; there is the tiniest 'notch' on the distro indicating the position for the rotor at TDC; most people simply say aim it at cylinder #1 (which works). New rotor and new distro cap added.

(https://i.imgur.com/0bhn2PV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GU4wpfi.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/z8V4LQj.jpg)

Cambelt covers refitted. I managed to buy NOS (new old stock) replacements for the rightside cover (left of photo) and circular front pieces, but reusing the original leftside cover (still want to buy a NOS replacement when I find one).

(https://i.imgur.com/fmtLwDR.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/cHjHyvT.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lmdd2G8.jpg)

And finally, my favourite new upgrade: a full set of Recaro sport seats. These were bought through Arese Spares (SYD), imported from the UK. Took 7 months to arrive, but worth it! The cloth inserts on the front seats are worn through, but I have always planned to do a full leather retrim, so this is no big deal. These seats are nice and firm and body-hugging, compared to the cushy, flat original seats.

(https://i.imgur.com/rxaUdNr.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/01YiAvg.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/aDO1Nvr.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PrqaizP.jpg)

See you next month!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on March 05, 2012, 01:47:27 PM
shiny...............fantastic job, are you going to the island over the weekend for the historics?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on March 05, 2012, 03:53:35 PM
Cheers mate. I can't make it to Phillip Island unfortunately!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on March 05, 2012, 09:45:41 PM
love the car looks  :o so new .
went you get your recaro's recover if you need to sell the old covers please let me know, how a price  ;)
sorry if that a bite cheey.

cheers ,Awesome car  ;D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on April 05, 2012, 03:09:20 PM
hi shiny,
so how low are are new bumpers ? Or do i have the wrong end of the stike .
hope that you are going well .
cheers
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 05, 2012, 08:03:52 PM
Low? You mean, to the ground?

At the moment, I have Twin Spark bumpers to fit. These of course are not particularly low, though with an aftermarket front splitter fitted, they'll be at least as low as your Veloce bumper. But I'm still deciding whether TS vs Veloce vs EVO. ;)

I'm due to post an update this week when I have a chance!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on April 05, 2012, 08:52:53 PM
howdy m8,
was that you selling the long wheel flares ?
i have found a photo of what i mean with the height with the EVO and Veloce bumpers
the gray one is the veloce bumper

how do you find the recaros for fit .
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 05, 2012, 09:28:47 PM
was that you selling the long wheel flares ?
Quote

Wasn't me.  :P

Quote
i have found a photo of what i mean with the height with the EVO and Veloce bumpers
the gray one is the veloce bumper

Fair bit of difference. I do prefer the Veloce, for both reasons of clearance and being less 'in ya face'. Yours is a Veloce style, yeah? Did you source locally or from OS?

Quote
how do you find the recaros for fit .

Not having spent any real time in them, I love them. My 'frame' is what you'd probably call 'medium build' towards 'slight', so I find them really comfortable and hugging. For those of 'big/broad' build could find them a little tight.

:)

Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on April 05, 2012, 10:07:41 PM
This is why i ask
http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/milano-75-1987-1989/193809-evo-side-skirts-fender-moulds-sale.html


 I prefer the Velcoe because of the reasons you stead and it was all i could get it took a lot of work to get it back to f/glass some one in his wisdom glued them  together (the spliter and the bumper) i've removed about 3kg of paint from it before it was painted in 2pak ar130 red

I have found my seat awesome fit for me too .
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 06, 2012, 05:14:02 AM
Good work. I can fibreglass/bog/prep too if required. Will probably come in handy when I work on the bumpers.

This is why i ask
http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/milano-75-1987-1989/193809-evo-side-skirts-fender-moulds-sale.html

Ah yes, I enquired about them. I was not the seller.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: VeeSix on April 06, 2012, 10:54:29 AM
Great work, love to watch progress of another 75 that is going to be around for a long time, look forward to the next update!!!!!  :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on April 06, 2012, 04:35:25 PM
How the f%@k do you add so many photo's to 1 post????
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 11, 2012, 10:57:46 AM
@ VeeSix: cheers mate.
@ Duk: my photos are not 'attached' to these forums; instead, I upload them elsewhere (picturetrail.com) and add the links to my posts using the 'img' tags.

For the past month's update, I've been plugging away at lots of small details in the engine bay. Relatively small things that need doing, but take up more time than you anticipate! And plenty more of those little jobs to do.

I tidied up the wiring to the thermostat housing. In original format, the wires were overly long and 'hung' in a messy fashion. So the main aim was pulling them back for a neater appearance. First, I removed the Bosch plugs from the thermotime switch plug and the ECU temp sender plug; then I could fit new Bosch rubber boots. The black pvc tubing covering the wires for the dash engine temp gauge and groundwire was cut off cos it was perishing, so new tubing could be fitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/qPZYPsM.jpg)

Here's a previous photo of the original wiring:

(https://i.imgur.com/4lUEYUA.jpg)

New Bosch rubber boots fitted. New black pvc tubing fitted over the wiring to the dash temp gauge sender, with new terminals crimped onto the wires, which I cut shorter by about 5cm. Heatshrink insulation fitted over the new terminals. New titanium bolt secures the groundwire to the housing.

(https://i.imgur.com/9rhT6M2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4V6z648.jpg)

It's now much neater. When I refit the upper radiator hose, I will decide whether the wiring travels over the top (original route) or is neater under the hose.

(https://i.imgur.com/BWXyVLM.jpg)

For the fuel return hose, I sprayed the small bracket black, and fitted a new grommet.

(https://i.imgur.com/jPRPHko.jpg)

Under the engine now, I removed the oil sump cover. Cleaned away the old sludge and cleaned the external surface; plenty of degreaser and high pressure hosing. Refitted with a new gasket. A PO had fitted a magnetic sump plug; I added a new copper washer. Gasket and washer were both part of the full gasket kit I'd bought.

(https://i.imgur.com/yhS3hIK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nxVqk4z.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/bRimCmh.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PgkMBR9.jpg)

Some extra new titanium bolts replaced 4 'visible' bolts, securing the crank seal cover and oil sump.

(https://i.imgur.com/6SB4Vfy.jpg)

Started to fit caster rod ball joints for the front suspension. Bolt holes need drilling, so doing it now whilst I can access the area inside the engine bay easily with the radiator out, AC condenser pushed aside, and piping moved. A PO had already fitted PU bushes in place of the factory rubber ones, but ball joints are more 'solid', though unforgiving; meant to be a good upgrade.

(https://i.imgur.com/cdIEN29.jpg)

I've only done the driver-side so far. Wheel off, on axle stands, caster rod removed; cleaned the area.

(https://i.imgur.com/9qXN7cM.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7hf2nOa.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/azddqpd.jpg)

Mock assembly, you can envisage the pieces being bolted in position with the spacers either side of the chassis pocket. The chassis surfaces are not perfectly flat, so an angle grinder was used to slightly contour. Note, this kit is from EB Spares (UK) , chosen because one end of the outside-spacer is pre-fashioned to fit snuggly into the corner of the chassis pocket. Other kits require similar to be done.

(https://i.imgur.com/QkFYVLn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/d1BjmDe.jpg)

Using the outside-spacer as a template, one hole was drilled through the chassis pocket. Bolting both spacers in position, the second hole was drilled from inside the engine bay.

(https://i.imgur.com/vqKNRfn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/iZMrGir.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0mQBs9D.jpg)

Caster ball joint then test fitted. Needed to grind off the edge of the ball joint flange for perfect fitment.

(https://i.imgur.com/dpo2Jv2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rbnnAvy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ulI7H3n.jpg)

All raw metal surfaces coated with rust proofing paint. I'll then coat the area with black sound deadener that I used at the front of the radiator area. And I'll need to do the passenger-side next.

(https://i.imgur.com/FlYt6jp.jpg)

Another modification I thought I'd try is applying self-adhesive heat shield matting opposite the manifolds. I'm sure the heat was contributing to the deteriorated paint in these areas. Cheap, from ebay, it is meant to be heat proof, water proof, and stick forever! Well, we shall see.  ;)

(https://i.imgur.com/Nj0wgGo.jpg)

This is the driver-side area. With the engine supported underneath and engine mount removed, area cleaned, I applied patches of heat shielding.

(https://i.imgur.com/cafqBqs.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VuCl65X.jpg)

To cover the base around the engine mount a piece was stuck entirely across. Then the mount refitted and used as a template to cut around the edge with a utility knife, and the patch removed.

(https://i.imgur.com/2Y78JMZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/g2wyqD2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/V5OnBYt.jpg)

A new engine mount fitted, complete with heat shielding wrapped around the rubber - hopefully it will last! These are from IAP (US); the small locating pins are spaced about 1.5mm too far from the main bolt so it didn't seat properly. Another angle grinder job to shave the bottom edge of the pin. The old mount was starting to perish.

(https://i.imgur.com/OqfgKvy.jpg)

All fitted, ready to be bolted up.

(https://i.imgur.com/Og9PH1V.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Heg7WOQ.jpg)

Thanks for looking. See you next month!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Anthony Miller on April 11, 2012, 01:33:53 PM
Hey Richard, nice work. just a thought about the heat shielding, wouldn't it be directing more heat to the fuel lines the way you've installed it with the fuel lines running between the headers and the shielding?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 11, 2012, 01:45:27 PM
Yes, agreed. I had thought about that too, so I need to review exactly what lines are passing-by. I'd like to protect them too, so I'll be looking into heat shield wrapping/tubing. Or I may simply apply some of the self-adhesive stuff over the top of them. It's on the list to address.  ;D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on April 12, 2012, 07:45:32 AM
richard
its all looking good!
just one thing, I read on greg gordons site (highperformance store) that the thermotime switch is problematic and can be disconnected.
apparently it is an early form of emissions device that has a history of making the engine run rough.

Thought I might mention this and let me know your thoughts

regards greg
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 12, 2012, 08:12:33 AM
Cheers mate.

Ah, you're referring to the coolant temperature to ignition sensor. Just refreshed my memory by re-reading Greg Gordan's article. It's a fourth sensor that isn't fitted to 'our' cars (I don't know if any later-model 75's in Australia have them; probably fitted to some GTV6's?). Not to be confused with the thermotime switch, coolant temp to ECU sensor, and coolant temp to dash gauge sensor. The hole for ignition sensor is blanked off, so the car is new enough to have avoided having one fitted in the past.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on April 13, 2012, 07:43:57 AM
as usual a  comprehensive response.............you are becoming a very valuable asset for all us 75 owners...
as you read this I will be on my way in my 75 to auto italia in canberra
rgds greg
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on April 21, 2012, 09:08:10 PM
richard how did you take out the camshaft seals?

rgds greg
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 22, 2012, 09:00:04 AM
Hey Greg

They are pretty much a press-fit. But mine had some silicone used to seal around the outer edge; still easy to remove. From memory, I tapped them out from the inside, but that was easy for me with the camshafts removed.

If the camshafts are not going to be removed, then there's probably not enough access to tap them out from the inside. So you'll need to get creative  ;) . Some sort of 'hook' would be good; maybe bend the end of some coathanger wire. But whatever you use, if it's metal, be careful not to scratch the metal.

Good luck. :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on April 22, 2012, 07:51:21 PM
thanks guys............got back from canberra and noticed an oil leak around the camshaft sprocket.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 22, 2012, 08:30:53 PM
Yeah, a proper puller would be ideal (?brass hook). I had a quick look for these at the time, but didn't need them in the end. I found my seals easy to remove, so I don't think you'll need to work at it very hard.

Bit of a nuisance for you: cambelt-off job and all that. If you need to borrow the cam pulley tools, you know I've got 'em; just that I'm not around the corner from you!  ;)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on April 23, 2012, 07:42:51 PM
richard
I actually ordered them about 4days ago
thanks anyway....................appreciate the offer

rgds
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: johnnyc on April 25, 2012, 07:27:20 AM
hi shiny, what size/ manufacturer rubber are you running on your 75? how do you find them? good or bad in the wet?

i need to replace the rears on my car and am looking at a variety of tyres. may consider the bridgestone adrenalin Potenza re001, or something in Michelin or Pirelli. I really want to go and eyeball them first before I make a decision.

regards, john.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 25, 2012, 09:15:56 AM
Hey John

My car's far from complete, so it's only on the rubber fitted by the PO to meet RWC requirements (no-name tyres). But it will eventually run 225/35R18, and probably Continental ContiSportContact3, depending on availability.

I have used RE001 Adrenalin on my 155, in 205/40R17, and rated them highly. Have since fitted Continental DW Extreme 215/40R17, and also rate these very highly, they they seem to be a little softer and wearing a little faster.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on April 25, 2012, 11:03:52 AM
But it will eventually run 225/35R18, and probably Continental ContiSportContact3, depending on availability.

That is a big wheel and tyre for the 75!

Of course it will depend on the offset of the rims.
I've dummy assembled my Mazda RX7 mags with 225/50/16 tyre onto the adapter hubs I had made and that effectively gives the rims a +30 offset (+50 standard). With the 225/50, there is no way the front tyres clear the front edge of the side skirt with any more than about 1/4 turn on the steering wheel.

According to http://www.miata.net/garage/tirecalc.html a 225/50/16 has a diameter of 631.4mm but the tape measure says more like 615mm.
The 205/40/17 I also have are said to be 595mm but measure 585.
The calculator says 614.7mm for 225/35R18.

Either way, the 225/50/16 I have measure 50mm larger in diameter than the standard spare wheel.

So if you have a tyre with a diameter more than, at a guess and it could be less, 600mm on a +30 offset, they won't fit in the front.
With less offset you may be able to use slightly larger diameter tyres.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 25, 2012, 11:33:21 AM
Yes, will be a tight fit on the front. I'm a long way from being at the stage of fitting wheels/tyres, so not an issue for quite a while! But from all my research, it should be able to fit, but may need slight trimming of the rear of the wheel arch liner and the edge of the bumper.

Wheels will be 18x8 +35mm.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: VeeSix on April 25, 2012, 11:43:45 AM
Wow! I can not wait to see them fitted! The 75 will look fantastic once you sort them out, do you have the wheels yet? If so any photos?  :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 25, 2012, 12:14:06 PM
I do have the wheels, but haven't taken any proper photos. I had to import them from Germany, secondhand - couldn't find any locally. They are OZ Racing Superleggera, which are a superceded wheel, hence hard to find. They will be cleaned up and resprayed. Same as these wheels; pics of this car were my inspiration:

Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: johnnyc on April 25, 2012, 12:45:06 PM
they are very nice. i have the original alloy wheel on mine, hence running cheese cutters, 195/55/r15.

for the moment I will keep the original wheels but looking to upgrade to something slightly bigger, perhaps 205, assuming that tyre would fit. i also need to look at improving the original brake package. current brakes leave a bit to be desired.

your car is coming along nicely.

cheers
Title: 18 inch wheels
Post by: VeeSix on April 26, 2012, 11:06:46 AM
Fantastic, can not wait to see you fit yours especially in your mentioned wheel and tyre sizes!  ;)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 26, 2012, 11:13:45 AM
Cool pic.

Yeah, thanks. I do have some doubts with the fronts, but time will tell, and hopefully nothing more than minor mods will see them fit! Otherwise, I'll be offloading and forced to go with 17s instead.  :-\
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on April 26, 2012, 02:41:44 PM
Do you have the tyres you plan to use? If so, any chance of measuring their diameter for us?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 26, 2012, 08:59:11 PM
No, haven't bought the tyres yet. So I can only go on specs (or theoretical diameter/circumference).

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: johnnyc on May 07, 2012, 10:45:52 PM
hi shiny,

when doing the work to your car, did you buy a manual or technical guide? do you have the details?

thanks, john
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on May 08, 2012, 09:34:52 AM
Hey John. I have been referring to the downloadable workshop manual on 'Craig's Place' website: http://www.users.on.net/~craigf/

That has proved sufficient thus far.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on May 08, 2012, 01:53:51 PM
This month's update: still working on minor engine bay details. Slowly but surely, to ensure each bit looks its best. Later this month, the car will be transported to its new temporary home - but into an enclosed garage  :D . Together with moving house, hopefully I'll have time to do a bit more work on the car to show next month.

New bonnet rod clip. Sshh, it's a Toyota piece ;) . One cause of fires in these cars is a broken clip, and the rod sliding across to an unprotected battery positive terminal = short circuit.

(https://i.imgur.com/jAnfG75.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lT6ExcB.jpg)

Upgrading one of the powerwires. Directly from the battery is a thickish wire going to the starter motor, then the wire continues on to a 'terminal board' on the right side of the engine bay to supply the wiring looms on this side of the car. From the starter to the terminal board, the wire is pretty thin, approx 10awg, which would be rated up to 60A continuous. Probably enough, but no harm in having a thicker wire, so I have changed to 4awg (125A), to ensure negligible voltage drop.

Here's the wire, disconnected from the terminal board. Then cut short and the end insulated with some heatshrink. The black wire that runs alongside to the starter is the trigger wire to activate the solenoid and starter.

(https://i.imgur.com/i8ZEF2o.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/1steK5J.jpg)

New 4awg wire, with ring terminal lugs to crimp on each end. Heat shield tubing to cover the portion that runs alongside the engine block and behind the exhaust manifold. Compare the 4awg with 10awg.

(https://i.imgur.com/Q91bmhG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yd3PLKB.jpg)

Lug attached, heatshrink, and heat shield tubing. Then attached onto the bolt securing the original wires; thread lock for good measure.

(https://i.imgur.com/HWvsBlj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/UZFozOL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yXVuLwj.jpg)

Other end has new lug, heatshrink, and in keeping with factory wiring standards, a short portion of exposed 'red' wire for identification. Attached to the terminal board; notice the factory powerwires that go to the looms. According to the wiring schematics, two of those wires supply the fusebox in the cabin, so I plan to trace and replace these for something thicker.

(https://i.imgur.com/9kfpO1U.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/MjCJxVo.jpg)

The terminal board also holds connections for the starter solenoid wiring. Turning the ignition key provides power directly to the black starter solenoid wire. This is relatively high current, and it is a common fault over time to burn out the contacts in the switch from repeated arcing across the contact-points. An upgrade, is adding a relay: the ignition wires now trigger the relay (via terminal 85), making it a very low current circuit; the relay now switches the high current supply to the starter solenoid. Thus, I've added a short red powerwire directly from the terminal board to the relay (terminal 30), which then supplies the original black wire to the solenoid (terminal 87). The relay is mounted in a convenient space on the metal mounting bracket.

(https://i.imgur.com/K2C9yFw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9srBx9s.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/pENV7QP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/y3V5p35.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/w5Iqse7.jpg)

New altitiude sensor fitted. The original had a broken plastic mounting bracket. This sensor alters air-fuel delivery for proper idling at altitude; but hardly relevant in Australia!

(https://i.imgur.com/yT1zulp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/CcufMRm.jpg)

Along the way, additional heatshrink and pvc tubing was added to cover wires for a neater appearance.

(https://i.imgur.com/V5nLHWH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qMXwdDN.jpg)

Fuel injection combi relay cleaned and refitted with a new Allen head bolt.

(https://i.imgur.com/wwi4gRy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/XyMjCmR.jpg)

Fuel damper pot (smooths out pulsatile fuel supply from fuel pump going to the fuel rail) and aircon idle electrovalve (supplies additional air/revs at idle when AC kicks-in) were corroded, so these were polished. Also did the distributor vacuum advance, then sprayed with clear coat to prevent corrosion.

(https://i.imgur.com/YM5SsXv.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lGKFbBx.jpg)

Damper pot and electrovalve refitted to the mounting bracket. All pieces have been bolted in position, replacing factory screws (TB=terminal board; AS=altitude sensor; R=relay; FICR=fuel injection combi relay); likewise, titanium bolts hold the small black bracket and electrovalve in place.

(https://i.imgur.com/N7ZwMfk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/081KwNj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yHZ68cG.jpg)

A reminder of how it used to look. The vacuum lines (eg: to/from electrovalve) will be replaced with silicone hoses.

(https://i.imgur.com/mHOy07g.jpg)

New 7.5mm inner diameter EFI fuel hose for the engine bay. 4 short hoses (arrows; bottom left=tank to damper pot; upper left=damper pot to fuel rail; upper right=fuel rail to cold start injector; lower right=pressure regulator to return line to tank)

(https://i.imgur.com/pUWV7SP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/RUobpL5.jpg)

Onto a different area: making a start below the windscreen. Wipers removed, and cowl trim removed, revealing years of dirt and leaves!

(https://i.imgur.com/f9X833C.jpg)

High pressure hose, a thorough wipe, and some polish/sealant to bring it back to new. Grime on the windscreen needed a buffing wheel and polish to scrub clean.

(https://i.imgur.com/IQi52nB.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/opwe03a.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lmx1fEm.jpg)

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on May 08, 2012, 02:04:47 PM
I'm loving your updates m8 Keep m coming .
If you need any info I have a full alfa milano workshop "book" for 2.5 & 3.0 I would be  only to happy to photo copy
any pages for you .

Cheers Shane
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Sheldon McIntosh on May 08, 2012, 06:21:24 PM
Awesome work Shiny.  Truly, we are not worthy....

(http://gifsoup.com/imager.php?id=120924&t=o) (http://gifsoup.com/view/120924/we-re-not-worthy-waynes-world.html) GIFSoup (http://gifsoup.com/)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on May 09, 2012, 10:03:06 AM
richard
as usual a great reference post for all 75 owners.

I have one question and I hope you can help.
As you probably know I have removed all my aircon. (or I thought I had)
on your latest post I noticed AC IDLE ELECTROVALVE............ mine is still connected in every respect.
What do I need to do to remove this ?

hope you can help

rgds greg
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on May 09, 2012, 11:12:30 AM
You could just leave it; it won't affect performance at all. With AC off (or removed), the valve will be closed, so no air passes through.

But, removing will be as simple as disconnecting the vacuum hoses, and blanking off the holes in the plenum and intake pipe, disconnecting the two wires to the electrovalve, and then you're free to unbolt the valve and throw it in the bin.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on May 10, 2012, 08:37:33 AM
thanks richard
I might remove it as I think it will look cleaner around the engine bay
rgds
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on June 09, 2012, 08:47:35 PM
This month's update is relatively small. But it did involve a big move; we have temporarily relocated to a house with a single garage. GT's gone into storage, 155 and 159 are outside in the driveway, and the 75 is in the garage  ;D !

(https://i.imgur.com/NKZ9Reg.jpg)

Prior to the move, I managed to continue working in the engine bay.

I bought some fuel hose ferrules, for a neater finish to the ends of the hoses.

(https://i.imgur.com/Tw1ssbk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2Oq4Jlf.jpg)

This is the windscreen wiper trim. Needs a good clean and 'blackener'. Removing it required loosening the bonnet for more clearance.

(https://i.imgur.com/aJpknvG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/C0nHvth.jpg)

The main bracket supporting the wiper motor and arms has been masked for spray painting, and the driver side support bracket cleaned for painting.

(https://i.imgur.com/easeuHT.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ORvtoLQ.jpg)

This is the black trim piece that sits infront of the firewall. There's a worn patch from rubbing against a wiring loom, and the faded, pale top edge looks aged. The original foam stapled to the rear has perished. I'll give the trim a light coat of black spray paint to cover the top edge and wear and tear; and the foam will be replaced.

(https://i.imgur.com/7gcB2yf.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/QdLtOd3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ilYWuqU.jpg)

I've removed the split conduit covering the main wiring loom on the driver side of the engine bay. I want to replace the corrugated conduit with pvc tubing for a simpler, smoother and cleaner finish.

(https://i.imgur.com/fbL19j7.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/kWFXqbU.jpg)

That's all I managed to do last month. But I should be able to catch up and do a lot more this month to make up for it. ;)

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on June 09, 2012, 11:24:49 PM
nice one mate look'en good. So planing any trips when it finished ?
Cheers
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: VeeSix on June 13, 2012, 11:48:00 AM
Enjoying watching the progress, why the temporary move? Are you building the ultimate 4 car garage with hoist?  ;)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on June 13, 2012, 04:50:58 PM
Cheers guys.

@ alphie75: I'd love to take it to Auto Italia in CBR one year. Not sure I'd be making a trip to SA with it.  :-\
@ VeeSix: well, no hoist, but it'll be at least a 4 car garage!  ;D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on June 13, 2012, 07:53:22 PM
gday mate,
Hmmm that sounds like it mite be a good trip ,going via the coast road you would cruze right passed my front door
you would be welcome for a coffee.

I have rego on the car today took it out for a spin and blew the clutch salve cylinder hose, so that will need to be fixed. asap

cheers


Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 03, 2012, 10:17:20 AM
For this update, I worked on several different areas around the engine bay. Lots of little details which take plenty of time, but will be worth it in the end.

One design weakness in the 75 (as if!) is the cabin air inlet area. Firstly, no grill over the intake aperture means debris enters the fan blower housing which can be hazardous (hot fan resistor + debris); future job is cleaning out the ventilation unit under the dash. I'll make up a mesh grill to cover the opening. Also, water is meant to flow out the drain outlet; however, debris also blocks this area, resulting in damp crud = RUST. Indeed, my car was not immune to this, and there was a lot of crud blocking off the outlet. gergory had warned me about this, from his experience.

(https://i.imgur.com/aW7bCLm.jpg)

Time, moisture, engine heat...whatever...the foam gasket between the outlet hole and pipe had perished and leaked water. I drilled out the rivets to remove the pipe.

(https://i.imgur.com/fud1sdE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LXIP59G.jpg)

The area is hard to access and photograph, but after the initial cleaning, you can see the areas of rust in the thin-walled air inlet aperture frame. Debris and water sits infront of the aperture causing grief over the years. Fortunately, the main firewall structure (the bottom section and where the drainage outlet is) seems intact with no obvious rust.

(https://i.imgur.com/7fga0Gc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7PW4cTw.jpg)

After crunching away as much rust as possible, I painted the whole area liberally with Cold Gal rust proofer. Next task will be patching the holes with fibreglass and plenty of resin.

(https://i.imgur.com/1p8S8si.jpg)

Reworked the powerwiring again. As per the wiring diagrams in the workshop manual, I located the two main powerwires feeding the fusebox under the steering wheel. These originate from the terminal board in the engine bay that I had attended to previously; the wiring diagram denotes the wires as 4mm^2 each (approx 10~11awg). I don't know why Alfa chose 'two smaller wires' rather than 'one thicker wire'. I can only postulate that the 9mm (wide) spade terminals that connect the wires to the fusebox are not rated high enough to carry the current to supply all the electrics; that is, if the electrics require 60A of current under full load for example, a single connection could be a weak link. So the load is shared across two connections, and thus two wires. Meh, I can improve on this setup.

(https://i.imgur.com/hMl0Zi1.jpg)

From the engine bay, I located the powerwires in the loom, cut them, and removed entirely.

(https://i.imgur.com/IJ7UwAs.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tIzWsME.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jwYUH7R.jpg)

After removing the two wires, I filled the vacancy in the firewall grommet with silicone. Also, change of plan! I had previously upgraded the main wire feeding the terminal board from the starter motor, to improve power delivery to the fusebox and engine bay loom. However, I have since decided to relocate the battery to the boot, so that upgrade has become redundant. I will run a new powerwire from the boot to the fusebox in the future. Thus, I removed the upgraded powerwire, and reinstated the original wire by joining a short length of 8awg wire to where I cut it short. This wire now only needs to feed the engine bay loom, and no longer supply the fusebox/electrics.

(https://i.imgur.com/NIjARyR.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7Tcw5Du.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JKFT6mf.jpg)

The terminal board is now simplied. It has the 8awg feed from the starter motor connection, a wire to the starter relay/solenoid (an upgrade I did earlier), and a wire to relays at the front of the engine bay.

(https://i.imgur.com/XnEd3kp.jpg)

I stripped the wiring loom on the R-hand side of the engine bay of all the tape. You can see the red powerwire for the relays dangling down loosely.

(https://i.imgur.com/oX834mo.jpg)

Another upgrade will be rewiring the headlight (low + high beam) wiring to something thicker and feeding directly from the battery supply. Thus, the green/grey (and black ground) wires were cut from the loom to reduce the bulk.

(https://i.imgur.com/guggk9x.jpg)

There are two small 'branches' coming off the loom. First are the wires to the coolant expansion tank 'coolant level sensor'. I covered these with new pvc tubing. The neatest tubing was narrow diameter, too small to slide over the existing spade terminals. Rather than cut off the terminals, I cut the wires proximally, added the tubing, resoldered, then insulated with heatshrink. The other branch is the red powerwire to the relays.

(https://i.imgur.com/QFRGS5Q.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IuF19ri.jpg)

Another minor change in plan: I had bought plenty of new corrugated split conduit to replace the original. However, I prefer the cleaner look of smooth pvc tubing; this also doesn't gather dirt/grime like the corrugations do. So, larger diameter tubing was used to cover the main loom. I measured and cut out side holes for the two small wire branches. It was a tedious job, feeding through a metre of wires through the tubing, but I got there! I first had to unclip all the wires from their plugs on the ends, itself a tedious job (I also took reference photos to ensure I reinserted all the wires into the correct holes in each plug).

(https://i.imgur.com/F0E8PMX.jpg)

All the wires/branches at the far end were then covered with new pvc tubing and heatshrink for a fresh new look. The groundwires will be fitted with new lugs/ring terminals and connected to a new grounding bar.

(https://i.imgur.com/v4fTK33.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ipx8w2Q.jpg)

Here's an old photo as a reminder of how it used to be:

(https://i.imgur.com/tiUXvdX.jpg)

This is another smaller wiring loom that connects to the main loom (via 4-wire plug); it connects relays for the AC compressor clutch, and radiator fan power supply, with power connections to a small terminal board (which is supplied by the powerwire branch discussed earlier). This loom also has wires for the radiator fan thermal switch (ie: the radiator fan is turned on/off via this switch which is screwed into the radiator and senses when the coolant approaches 90 degrees celcius), and AC trinary switch.

(https://i.imgur.com/XIxh2v0.jpg)

Loom stripped of corrugated conduit and tape, then overhauled with pvc tubing and heatshrink (yes, another time-consuming task! ;) ).

(https://i.imgur.com/VnY0eC9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/49SMT3S.jpg)

The arrows highlight the exposed ends to show wire colours for easy identification. Whilst this is in keeping with the factory design, let's just say it's now a bit neater!

(https://i.imgur.com/6GwlaH4.jpg)

I retrofitted OE-spec relays. A previous owner had fitted aftermarket Bosch relays, but these were 'unfused'. The replacement relays are secondhand, but work fine; they are fused (30A for radiator fan; 10A for AC clutch), and from research they are the same colours as original (though no actual difference in design). I discovered that the pin layout was different: pins 30 (main power) and 86 (coil ground), which I have circled in the photo. What's more, the AC clutch relay wires had not be changed to cater for the Bosch relay pins! The fan relay wires had been appropriately changed, but it may explain why the AC was not working (hopefully it's as simple as that)! I have obviously reverted the fan relay wires to suit.

(https://i.imgur.com/8VNc8Iu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yeGQRyK.jpg)

The relays and wiring loom, and power supply terminal board have been refitted to the car.

(https://i.imgur.com/baIaeEp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xd29yJB.jpg)

New engine oil filter fitted. More compact than the existing one.

(https://i.imgur.com/1XYK0n9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5baxeHP.jpg)

The other task I finished was re-attaching the AC compressor. The belt tensioning pulley had a 'rough-feeling' bearing, so it wasn't going to last a lot longer. The original bearing is cast within the pulley, and thus the bearing alone is not replaceable. I bought an aftermarket pulley+bearing from ebay but alas, the inner diameter of the bearing was not the right match for the spacer it fits over. However, this version has a simple snap ring securing the bearing which was removable; so I sourced the correct size bearing from a local supplier and pressed it into position.

(https://i.imgur.com/K0VT6Cd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dfYOotw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0oHaSZV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/l73JTmu.jpg)

I cleaned then sprayed the mounting bracket.

(https://i.imgur.com/8sMPxEQ.jpg)

To clean up the compressor main pulley and clutch, I bought a cheap clutch-removal kit from ebay. The handle attaches to the clutch face via 3 supplied bolts (the model compressor on the car is a Sanden SD508, version 8390); using the handle to prevent the clutch rotating, the lock nut is removable.

(https://i.imgur.com/oFZubKA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/h4AsZ1Y.jpg)

Then a supplied adaptor added to the handle to convert to a puller, to remove the clutch from the spindle.

(https://i.imgur.com/Fm5FS4R.jpg)

Removed a small snap ring, then used a conventional 3-prong puller to take off the main pulley with its bearing.

(https://i.imgur.com/Lg3ZE7u.jpg)

Behind the pulley is the coil. This is energised by +12V, which then magnetically pulls the clutch against the pulley to lock them together, thus spinning the compressor. Removing another snap ring allows removal of the coil.

(https://i.imgur.com/j4zYBmK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ie6fX7i.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SWmRVCw.jpg)

The coil had an excessively long powerwire, so I cut this short, soldered and insulated with heatshrink.

(https://i.imgur.com/omTG2q9.jpg)

All components were cleaned. I sprayed the pulley and clutch (masking off the clutch mating surfaces). Then reassembled in reverse order. The 'air gap' between the mating surfaces was within spec, checked with a feeler gauge (0.4-0.8mm). Then I used a +12V power supply to test, and confirmed the clutch engaged with the pulley - works perfectly.

(https://i.imgur.com/dNxWcvW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3QXHDwt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JaLZDt0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KFkY2k4.jpg)

Service guide for Sanden compressors can be downloaded here: http://www.sanden.com/originals/images/SD_Service_Guide_Rev.2.pdf

That was a productive month. I continue to really enjoy it. I particularly have this weird fascination with wiring: wiring diagrams, rewiring, and making things neat and tidy   :-\ . I can't wait until I put the battery in the boot   :D .

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on July 05, 2012, 07:52:50 AM
richard another great post...............with all this electronic upgrade I was wondering if you were going to consider looking at the lethargic power window syndrome?
If you can come up with an upgrade it would be fantastic.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 05, 2012, 10:13:05 AM
Cheers Greg. Come time, I'll definitely assess the power supply to the windows. Have you modified the groundwires for the rear windows?
http://www.users.on.net/~craigf/rearwindowgrounds.htm

I haven't yet, but will get to it once I'm working in the cabin.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Sheldon McIntosh on July 05, 2012, 04:27:01 PM
richard another great post...............with all this electronic upgrade I was wondering if you were going to consider looking at the lethargic power window syndrome?
If you can come up with an upgrade it would be fantastic.

Have you tried relaying them?  I had that issue with my GTV6, but connecting 12v directly to the motor showed that they were more than quick enough with a decent source of voltage.
 
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GTVeloce on July 05, 2012, 04:46:59 PM
I have just had a go at trying the method of grounding the rear wires suggested on craig's place. However, I couldn't get the wire back into the plug once I had attached the second cable - there just wasn't enough room no matter what I tried. In the end I just cut and spliced into the cable about 20mm after the plug (instead of soldering at the plug end) and the result was still a significant improvement.
Title: 1989 Alfa Romeo 75 V6 3.0 12 valve
Post by: VeeSix on July 05, 2012, 07:05:10 PM
Great work, that 75 is going to be like brand new when it is finished, yes that area under the windscreen is a downside on the 75 as for the reasons you have mentioned, not so much the design fault but without reguler checking maintenace a 75 that has been kept outside will usually have rust in there, if you are lucky it will just rust thru on the engine bay side and simply run out down the back there but if not you will also have it running into the interior usually ending up on the drivers floor but sometimes also going over to the passenger side sometimes soaking electrical parts on the way down, if you have never checked this area on your 75 do it now, you may save yourself a bit of work, quite a hard area to access as well if you do not remove the plastic cover  :o 
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on July 05, 2012, 07:36:31 PM
gday blokes,
Shiny_car well done, If you ever have had to ever remove the brake peddle I have a few tips on putting back in (learned that hard way) and the steel bar from the brake to the booster is solid steel bar and it's very heavy.

all the best with the rest m8
Title: Re: 1989 Alfa Romeo 75 V6 3.0 12 valve
Post by: shiny_car on July 06, 2012, 09:19:00 AM
Thanks guys.

if you have never checked this area on your 75 do it now, you may save yourself a bit of work, quite a hard area to access as well if you do not remove the plastic cover  :o 

Yeah, removing the wiper cowl trim is a little tricky; I had to loosen the bonnet and of course remove the wiper blades, to jiggle it out. And removing the wiper mechanism wasn't easy either; awkward access and needed to disassemble much of it.

If you ever have had to ever remove the brake peddle I have a few tips on putting back in (learned that hard way) and the steel bar from the brake to the booster is solid steel bar and it's very heavy.

Hopefully I won't need to do this, but I'll hit you up for advice if I need to in the end!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on July 06, 2012, 12:43:29 PM
Hi Shiny car,
How is your clutch pedel is it one smooth action or two part action?
Because if it two part action your clutch pedel may look like this:
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 06, 2012, 06:54:26 PM
Hmm, I haven't driven it for well over a year, but I vaguely remember it felt ok. I'll be sure to check the connection for signs of wear once I start working in the cabin. Thanks for the photo.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on July 16, 2012, 07:59:52 PM
gday m8,
I am having trouble with the 3 relay on the right ,I have seen your photo on the 1st page of (two small one big)
my'n are (small ,big, small)?
Would you know to buy new relay ;low,high beam.

cheers
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 16, 2012, 08:43:23 PM
Hey alphie

Indeed, the relays in my car are fitted out of order. When I start overhauling the wiring on the passenger side of the engine bay, I will fit them properly, 'small-big-small'.

Which one do you need? In the correct order, it should the 'horn relay' (small, at the front), 'headlight wiper timer' (big, middle), and 'brake fluid level switch relay' (small, rear). I have not inspected mine yet.

The description of each (pin layout) is in the workshop manual (Group 40 Electrical System / pages 75-40-10 to 75-40-12).

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on July 25, 2012, 06:10:53 PM
Howdy,
Would you have any photos of the top's of the 'horn relay' and 'brake fluid level switch relay' so i can see what written on the top please.

I think prev owner has messed up the relays.

cheers
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 25, 2012, 08:54:51 PM
I'll try and take photos tomorrow, and confirm what each relay is.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 26, 2012, 08:08:47 PM
Here's photos, but the actual photos are less important than referring to the workshop manual Electrical System:
http://www.craig75.clutchout.com/group_40_electrical.zip

My horn relay is white. In the workshop manual, refer to page 75-40-10. You will see that it is a SPST 'dual 87' relay.

(http://www.rallylights.com/images/b2-con.jpg)

My brake fluid level switch relay is silver. In the workshop manual, refer to page 75-40-12. You will see that it is a SPDT relay.

(http://www.rallylights.com/images/b1-con.jpg)

Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on July 26, 2012, 08:41:15 PM
thank you very muchly,
your brake f,level is the same as mine But the horn on mine is a metal top one .
All the white 'MP" relay are in the fuse box only.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on August 08, 2012, 10:04:41 PM
This month's update...

I fixed the rusted area under the windscreen wipers. This photo was posted previously, but it's a reminder of the area I patched:

(https://i.imgur.com/7fga0Gc.jpg)

A paper template was cut and used to create the pieces of fibreglass used to patch the front of the air inlet aperture. The smaller pieces of fibreglass go directly over the rust holes, with the bigger pieces over the entire front of the aperture. The area was masked with tape and newspaper.

(https://i.imgur.com/pakCSmE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/34WkzYn.jpg)

Q-Cel thickener was added to the polyester fibreglass resin; the thickened resin clings better to the rust holes and pools along the entire bottom of the drainage area.

(https://i.imgur.com/XQQPUq2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rlC24TG.jpg)

Once the fibreglass had set, the sharp edges were whittled smooth with a utility knife. The whole area was then masked with tape and paper for painting. I used the aerosol of Alfa Red 130 for a few coats, followed by clear coat.

(https://i.imgur.com/mSDyhm3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/gPhr1Vh.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/WezFzfT.jpg)

The aperture is now patched and painted, and the floor of the drainage area filled and smoothed with resin. I left the rough texture of the fibreglass, rather than smooth it over; the whole area is rather rough from the factory; you can see the bonding agent slopped around the side of the aperture, for example.

(https://i.imgur.com/gPhr1Vh.jpg)

I happened to have a piece of galvanised mesh; no idea where it came from! It was the perfect material to fashion a grill over the air inlet aperture. I drilled two holes in the aperture (then painted with rust proofer), and riveted the grill in position.

(https://i.imgur.com/6yJkqtq.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rLhHwZf.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DcXcapx.jpg)

I cleaned then refitted the drain outlet pipe. Instead of a rubber gasket, I liberally applied silicone sealant, and bolted the pipe in position.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZT5Ag8o.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dFvwa4P.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xnMbeuN.jpg)

The corrugated conduit covering the short wiring loom for the wiper motor, and oil pressure sender/sensor, was replaced using pvc tubing and heatshrink.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZHWoavO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4XENIGr.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/QTJNG7T.jpg)

Clamps for the aircon hoses were cleaned and refitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/6KfJTaF.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/MJOUlhG.jpg)

I cleaned the surface grime off the auxiliary air valve (AAV). The AAV provides more air with a cold engine by means of an internal shutter. There is an inbuilt warming coil, and once warmed-up the shutter moves across to close off the air passage. I took photos of the open shutter (after having the AAV in the fridge) and closed (AAV from the oven!). With some trial and error, I adjusted the shutter to be completely closed when warm (this optimises performance); but results in a smaller opening when cold which can make cold starting harder.

(https://i.imgur.com/BSWxVLS.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jVfgNRP.jpg)

Many groundwires bolt to the cam cover. Some are secured with a bolt holding the AAV, and others are secured by a cam cover bolt at the rear; I also needed to add the groundwire from the relay for the starter motor solenoid. I regrouped the wires into two bundles, both secured by the AAV bolts to the cam cover. Later, when all the engine hardware is in place, I will upgrade various ground points in the engine bay with additional wires.

(https://i.imgur.com/GqhCptsl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tE6oPYzl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/s2wWa48l.jpg)

From other photos you may have seen I figured out how to remove the windscreen wiper mechanism (by uncoupling one of the ball joints). This made it far easier to clean. Then I carefully refitted it to the car without scratching the cowl; and resprayed and refitted the black support bracket on the driver side. Finally, the wiper motor was bolted into position, using titanium bolts throughout.

(https://i.imgur.com/WCTOJWql.jpg)

[img width1024 height=682]https://i.imgur.com/KEWtOAil.jpg[/img]

(https://i.imgur.com/nomwg3Jl.jpg)

Last job of the month was fitting a new coolant header tank (expansion bottle), including a new 0.7 bar pressure cap.

(https://i.imgur.com/YaW7E45.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2ZaMC9pl.jpg)

This was combined with a coolant bottle silicone hose kit from hiperformancestore.com (http://www.hiperformancestore.com/milano75.htm) . One difficult hose passes from the back of the L engine head to a T-piece that sits behind the R engine head. Coolant flows from the engine to the T-piece then either through the firewall to the cabin heater core or back to the header tank.

(https://i.imgur.com/ABfF2dml.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KK8ryd7l.jpg)

Because of corrosion, the original hose was firmly stuck and required splitting with a utility knife then peeling off the metal pipes. This is the T-piece; the hose from the engine head has been removed, so too the hose going to the head tank. The remaining hose is to the heater core, which hopefully never needs replacing! Note the corrosion. (Screwdriver only used for the photograph, to hold the T-piece in view.)

(https://i.imgur.com/2yZnePwl.jpg)

Original rubber hoses versus silicone hoses.

(https://i.imgur.com/bjNmLbt.jpg)

It was a little fiddly, but the new hoses were fitted, along with new stainless clamps. (Screwdriver only used for the photograph, to hold the hoses in view.)

(https://i.imgur.com/Y002G4Ml.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/URnKznPl.jpg)

The new header tank was screwed into position and all silicone hoses attached. There is an outlet hose passing from underneath, and another return hose from the radiator. A new metal P-clamp replaces a broken plastic hose clamp.

(https://i.imgur.com/3qgVOHo.jpg)

Thanks for reading! See you next month.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on August 08, 2012, 11:16:44 PM
that art my friend I would be scared to drive it let alone park it in a public car park.

Don't O-ring on the heater tape. I did and now have to fit the green puddle maker.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Sheldon McIntosh on August 09, 2012, 07:56:51 AM
Nice work. 

How was it getting the silicon hose (from the head to the the T-piece) on?  I once replaced that with another rubber hose and it was a fre@k!n nightmare, I was ready to torch the car and buy a Toyota.  I'm planning on going the Greg Gordon silicon-hose route myself once the weather warms up a bit.

The remaining hose is to the heater core, which hopefully never needs replacing!

You shouldn't have said that!!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on August 09, 2012, 08:43:59 AM
I have just replaced the heater core  hose clamp if you call it that :
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on August 09, 2012, 09:01:52 AM
Cheers guys. :)

I'm more worried about having to replace the whole heater core hose, not the clamp. ;)

How was it getting the silicon hose (from the head to the the T-piece) on?  I once replaced that with another rubber hose and it was a fre@k!n nightmare, I was ready to torch the car and buy a Toyota.  I'm planning on going the Greg Gordon silicon-hose route myself once the weather warms up a bit.

It was moderately tricky; access is limited, and definitely easiest with the plenum off. My hands are pretty small, which helps. The kit comes with some grease to help slide the hoses on. That particularly one is pretty tight, so it took a few goes.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Sheldon McIntosh on August 12, 2012, 09:26:10 PM
It was moderately tricky; access is limited, and definitely easiest with the plenum off. My hands are pretty small, which helps. The kit comes with some grease to help slide the hoses on. That particularly one is pretty tight, so it took a few goes.

Thanks for that.  Just curious as to whether the silicon is easier than the rubber, I'm guessing and hoping yes (but still looks like a pretty decent stretch on your silicon hose there)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on August 13, 2012, 12:03:27 PM
I'd say silicone is easier. The hoses are quite soft and very flexible.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 10, 2012, 09:38:51 PM
Monthly update time!

I have completed all the major work on the driver/R side of the engine bay, and started on the passenger/L side.

Along the top edge of the front quarter panels are a row of hex head screw-type fasteners. In keeping with the Allen head bolt theme, I replaced these with titanium bolts. The original retaining tabs were surprisingly strong and difficult to remove; I ended up using brute force via a 7.5mm drill bit and drill, twisting them to the point of breaking. The opportunity arose to respray the panel edge red, plus clear coat, before fitting the new bolts with 6mm captive nuts (which are actually computer rack parts).

The bonnet hinge bolts were also replaced with new M8 Allen head versions.

(https://i.imgur.com/Q69P3z4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/zPeRMLt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/i7KGUwI.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SgaA1vG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/G3cSZ8W.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lJWH009.jpg)

With the AC compressor, I decided to replace all hex bolts with titanium Allen head versions. I also replaced one of the visible 10mm mounting bolts with a stainless steel version (bottom right of photo), and the 10mm bolt that secures a groundwire (wire not yet fitted; bolt is partially obscured, top left).

(https://i.imgur.com/Zza6CtR.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZBXAOXb.jpg)

Moving to the passenger/L side of the engine bay...

The original engine mount was removed. The engine was supported from underneath with a hydraulic jack. Heat shield self-adhesive matting was applied over the area directly opposite the exhaust manifold in a similar fashion to the driver side.

(https://i.imgur.com/9t2gs5Y.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JAnIBgV.jpg)

The original mount was fairly cracked on the surface, and had sagged. For proper fitment, the new mount (from IAP, US) required some fettling with the angle grinder, more than the other side. Heat shielding was applied around the perimeter of the rubber. The new mounts hold the engine higher by about 10mm. This was apparent when later refitting the lower bolt for the alternator; previously, I had to jack the engine up to provide clearance to slide the bolt without hitting the front cross member; with the new mount in position, enough clearance exists.

(https://i.imgur.com/XuCIx2O.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/hqdUiJk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PLb9B23.jpg)

The over-braided power steering hoses had faded, so I masked off the area and dusted them with black spray paint. Then painted the pump. It would have been a messy job to drain the fluid and do this out of the car, so it was all done still connected.

(https://i.imgur.com/vYDYKxy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/BSVD097.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/INEECNO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mWxC1gd.jpg)

I removed the PS pump pulley to repaint separately.

(https://i.imgur.com/HDtR3df.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Uy2nRDn.jpg)

This is the original vs refurbished alternators; the latter is meant to offer slightly more output though I'm unclear exactly how (might be rewound or magnets of closer tolerance, etc).

(https://i.imgur.com/QoL2jqJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xjk47Uv.jpg)

Whilst I liked the appearance of the zinc coated pulley, it didn't match the other engine pulleys, so I decided to prime and respray black.

(https://i.imgur.com/UzcfZld.jpg)

I read a complaint about the cheap voltage regulator on these refurbished alternators. Unsure how true it is, or how short-lived they are, but I replaced it with a genuine Bosch item, and will keep the cheaper one as a spare. You can also see how worn the brushes were on the original Bosch regulator.

The alternator and PS pump will be refitted later.

(https://i.imgur.com/MDdyWPS.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Vp2e89l.jpg)

Recently, I decided to relocate the battery from the engine bay to the boot, primarily for weight distribution purposes. It also helps declutter the engine bay, and will shorten the length of wiring to the stereo amplifiers, which are a relatively heavy burden on the electrical supply.

The battery tray was spot-welded to the chassis in many positions, some of which were difficult to visualise, and all in quite random locations. I drilled-out all the welds, though I drilled at least 3 holes where there wasn't a weld! A small amount of surface rust was found on the chassis under the tray.

(https://i.imgur.com/0CtK10q.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/itL5VNN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VI7tNAG.jpg)

The rust was buffed back to bare metal, then the area painted with Cold Gal Primer. The drill-holes were filled with globs of JB Weld (original holes were left open). Grinding this back as flat as possible still left the area looking worse for wear, so polyester resin (thickened with Q-Cel filler) was painted over the larger imperfections and sanded smooth. Another coat of Cold Gal Primer, then later finished with Alfa Rosso 130 paint (brushed + roller to create the same finish as the rest of the engine bay).

(https://i.imgur.com/dssHA6N.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ez8wcM4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Woq7MzY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/eRcYuxA.jpg)

Whilst working in this area, I drilled bolt holes for the suspension caster rod ball joint, same as on the driver side. The caster rod was removed, and the mounting pocket was cleaned of grime. This revealed a small amount of surface rust.

(https://i.imgur.com/ODs4h2G.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/u0OIOcq.jpg)

The lower mounting hole was marked then drilled (pilot hole, then progressively upsizing to the final 8mm hole). From inside the engine bay, the mounting spacer was fitted as a template to mark and drill the upper hole. The mounting pocket was buffed clean to remove the surface rust, and any metal spurs filed away from around the new holes.

(https://i.imgur.com/69lmm1q.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/C9AXFQU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/FfZbjPh.jpg)

Similar to the driver side, the spacers and ball joint flange required minor work with the angle grinder to mate perfectly with the pocket. Once everything test-fitted properly, the pocket was painted with Cold Gal Primer, ready for the future suspension stages.

(https://i.imgur.com/WxcEHBV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xsdaUdQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/k8fS0OS.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZOqGLC7.jpg)

Whilst I had the drill out (!), I made a 25mm hole in the firewall to cater for new 0 gauge powerwire. From inside the cabin, passenger side, the cover panel was removed from the dash above the 'glove box' tray. Behind a piece of sound deadener, the 2 main wiring looms were seen, and plenty of vacant firewall to create a new hole. I drilled a small pilot hole then followed with the 25mm hole-saw.

(https://i.imgur.com/exQzNne.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GIaYibE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/30ZpaPv.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/AWKgHNN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Qn8JwPc.jpg)

The 0ga grommet is solid plastic, and clamps around the wire once tightened, providing a weather-proof seal. Test fitted, then removed to paint the exposed bare metal rim with Cold Gal Primer.

(https://i.imgur.com/NnMInD8.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/flfHEr3.jpg)

With all that noisy, messy work finalised, I moved onto the wiring looms and electrics. First, I cleaned the ignition module and replaced a split 7-pin rubber boot. The terminals/wires were unlocked from the plug to exchange the boots. In doing so, I discovered one of the terminals was poorly crimped and fell off the bare ends of wire. It says a lot for Alfa Romeo quality control in the '80s (!), but it's fortuitous to find this now rather than face a niggling 'electrical fault' in the future that could have been impossible to locate.

(https://i.imgur.com/zYE12In.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7aMe1xN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IpOy4Dy.jpg)

With the terminal recrimped then soldered, the plug was reassembled and reconnected to the ignition module.

(https://i.imgur.com/CNTtBUf.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Yq15blI.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/TRQW2S2.jpg)

The L side wiring looms comprise the engine management loom (which connects to the ignition module, ignition coil, and battery; on the R side it connects to various sensors, the distributor, air flow meter, and fuel injectors) and a loom for engine bay electricals (including headlight, parking light, indicator, horns, windscreen/headlight washer pumps). The engine management loom was already covered in smooth pvc tubing; the other main loom was covered with corrugated split conduit. My task was replacing the corrugated conduit with smooth pvc. A major side branch from the main loom had wires to the washer fluid motors and extra wires to the ignition coil. An original terminal board in the same location connected the alternator (this wire already removed and not shown in photo); from there, a wire supplied the horns and a (recharging) wire to the battery. A small alternator output level 'warning light' wire (feeds a warning light in the dash if the alternator fails and loses power output) also connected via the terminal board. Wires/plug for the oil level sensor in the engine block also feed to the loom.

My overhaul removes the terminal board altogether: the main alternator output wire will be upgraded (in thickness) and feed directly to a new distribution block, and a new wire will pass from this distribution block to the battery in the boot; the alternator output level wire will be integrated with the oil level sensor wires; and the power feed to the horns will come from the distribution block too.

(https://i.imgur.com/WkQ0OXm.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/17WtmS9.jpg)

I removed the split conduit and tape from the main loom. Then any redundant wires were located and removed or modified: I no longer wanted headlight washers, so the wires from the relay to the pump were located and discarded (these are separate wires/pump to the windscreen washers); two loops of wire (grey/black and orange) near the brake fluid level sensor were found to be superfluous extensions from the main loom (ie: each wire in the main loom passed out along this short branch, then back again to the main loom, then onwards to the front of the engine bay), so the loops were cut off and the wires rejoined to pass directly along the main loom; L foglight wires removed; (front left) 'brake pad wear' wires were also removed because the Ferodo pads I will be fitting do not incorporate a wear indicator.

(https://i.imgur.com/3ZfjObn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mhlVZh2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/x7SgoqB.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ouaecr2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Zxihz0y.jpg)

The remaining wires were then divided into 3 smaller groups; small enough for the pvc tubing I had. 'Branch 1' was threaded through the new tubing, and has wires for the headlight, parking light/indicator, and various groundwires. The ends of the wires for the parking light/indicator were initially unlocked from the plug to facilitate passage through the tubing, then refitted to the plug; the wires for the low/high beam headlight have had the terminals cut off. Another modification will be feeding these to new relays, to control power fed directly from the new distribution block; a more robust power supply (ie: shorter, thicker wires) for brighter lights.

(https://i.imgur.com/gPFoWXm.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VKNmvMc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/z8s3BGV.jpg)

'Branch 2' has wires for the relays that fit at the front of the engine bay: brake circuit (fluid level, (redundant) pad wear circuit), wiper/headlight fluid motors, and horns. With all the wires unlocked from the relay sockets, they were passed through the pvc tubing. Shorter lengths of narrower pvc tubing plus heatshrink were used to cover the wires as they passed from the main tubing. I photographed all connections for reference before unlocking and refitting each wire to the relays, and cross-referenced with the wiring diagrams in the workshop manual (and found one mistake in the manual).

The relay for the brake circuit is a replacement; the original was too scratched/grotty for me! Also awaiting a replacement horn relay to match (ie: black); these are both secondhand, same brand as the others ('MP', made in Italy), ebay items, and both are slightly different (brake: SPDT; horn: double output SPST). The washer fluid relay is the original, and in good (cosmetic) condition. Note the red powerwire for the horn relay, which originally connected to the terminal board further back, but will now be redirected to the new distribution block.

(https://i.imgur.com/jzxg0i0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DcAvY3e.jpg)

'Branch 3' includes the two wires for the oil level sensor, and the green alternator output monitor wire. They all pass in the same direction down to the alternator and engine block via a short plug-in loom (which I will deal with next month). The green wire had connected via the discarded terminal board; in replacement, the three wires were combined into a new plug.

Two other wires in Branch 3 are from the main loom to the ignition coil. All these wires were covered with new pvc tubing and heatshrink.

(https://i.imgur.com/5Z7WhIt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dQTiIe1.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/AZhRgAd.jpg)

In some photos above, you may have noticed the ignition coil refitted. Simple resistance testing with a multimeter for the primary and secondary coils suggest it's in fine condition, so I see no need to replace with a new one (unless someone can tell me otherwise; I don't believe these 'wear out' as such, and nor are there performance benefits to be gained from new ones). The original Bosch decal was gone and the casing scratched, so I gave it a clean, light sand, then resprayed black. The metal holder was cleaned and refitted to the car with new bolts. The coil was clamped in position. The ignition module also bolts to this holder, but I rotated the module 180 degrees so the wiring loom now passes on the far side of the coil (they will be cable-tied together later); this declutters the area infront. The wires to the coil were carefully passed up through the clamp from underneath. The main high tension output wire to the distributor is yet to be fitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/U8EtPwY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/WO86fBc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PWfZsDB.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ur2qffi.jpg)

This old photo reminds you of how the wiring used to pass to the module, coil, and washer fluid motors.

(https://i.imgur.com/SLRxHt4.jpg)

This is the new distribution block, and is test fitted in the old battery position. It is made by Stinger, a brand renowned for its high quality car audio components, and a brand I've favoured for years with my stereos; I use Stinger for power wiring, distribution blocks, fuses, battery terminals, RCA audio cables, speaker wiring, etc. This model is the SHD821, and features 2 input terminal holes for either 0ga or 4ga wiring, and 4 outputs for 4ga or 8ga; it holds 4 MIDI fuses.

(https://i.imgur.com/KwA7UTW.jpg)

This is a roll of Stinger Pro series 0ga Matt Red power wire. 0ga (0 American Wire Gauge is the equivalent of 50mm^2 wire, can handle current up to ~300A 'continuous', has an outer diameter of ~8mm for the wire, and total outer diameter of ~15mm including the jacket) will connect the battery to the distribution block.

I measured the length to pass from the distribution block to the area above the glovebox behind the firewall (where it will terminate in another distribution block). A length of heatshrink was slipped over the wire and shrunk down for a neat covering.

(https://i.imgur.com/dU0i8QI.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/cpHQhWE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/hubTmNN.jpg)

Push mount cable ties replace the factory ties to hold the wiring looms in position. I have yet to zip tightly and cut short; at this stage the looms and powerwire are loosely held until everything is in position.

(https://i.imgur.com/ArH8foW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/8rJeYJH.jpg)

The 0ga power wire follows the main looms to the front and arcs down to the distribution block, which has been bolted to the chassis.

(https://i.imgur.com/YXA6wc5.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/cAlKHD1.jpg)

That's it for this month! Thanks for looking. Wow, well over 7000 views of this topic - MUCH appreciated!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Evan Bottcher on September 10, 2012, 10:19:03 PM
Whoa.  Nice update.  Enjoying your work, and attention to the little details.

Thanks for taking the time to update the thread.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on September 11, 2012, 08:08:11 AM
another great episode
when will the car make its debut?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on September 11, 2012, 10:24:39 AM
I'm staying tuned for the next exciting chapter "same bat time same bat channel"
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 11, 2012, 06:37:13 PM
Thanks guys!  :)


when will the car make its debut?

Who knows! It's taking far longer than anticipated. Realistically, it could be 2015!  ::)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on September 13, 2012, 06:23:49 PM
Shiny, that is some damn impressive work you're doing!  8)
Not just the quality but the quantity! You've done what I thought was near on impossible, you've made the wiring look neat and tidy!

Very impressive and inspirational!  ;D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 14, 2012, 10:37:39 AM
Thanks Duk! :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ANG156 on September 14, 2012, 06:16:59 PM
Hi Shiny,

Where did you purchase the black wire sleeving from?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 14, 2012, 07:59:50 PM
Fleabay: http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/PVC-Tubing-Wire-Conduit-1-2-inch-Black-10-ft-roll-/270774814749

1/2" diameter has been the largest I've readily found, at good cost. That same seller offers 3/4" and 1/4", which I also used.
I most recently bought 20' of 1/2" tubing (ie: 2 lots of 10', and sent as a continuous length, not cut); postage was US$7, so the total was a smidge under A$20, delivered.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Beatle on September 14, 2012, 08:32:58 PM
Have you ever used 'heatshrink'?  It can be quite handy stuff for tidying and insulating wiring and a host of other uses.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 14, 2012, 08:36:13 PM
Yeah, plenty of heatshrink has been used. I covered the 0ga wire with heatshrink. The ends of the pvc tubing are terminated with heatshrink, as are individual small branches of wire, etc. Definitely helps neaten everything.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on October 01, 2012, 12:14:28 PM
Shiny, I'm keen to see/read what you plan to do with your boot mounted battery set up.

I'm (still  :-[) contemplating my own 'non engine bay' set up and am toying with the idea of mounting the battery under the boot floor so that it isn't right next to the fuel tank and maintains boot space.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Beatle on October 01, 2012, 04:47:38 PM
Shiny,

What tools and what products are you using to carry out the detail polishing of paint and components around the engine bay?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 02, 2012, 11:07:04 AM
Hi Paul

Not sure if you are curious about any particular part I've done, but here's a summary of most of it:

*repainted parts (eg: brackets, pulleys, thermostat housing): cleaned, roughened with wire brush or wet&dry sandpaper; sprayed with 'etch primer' for metal; finished with sprayed VHT Engine Enamel in Aluminium/Satin Black/Matt Black
*engine bay (red): rather than the expensive, out-sourced task of spray painting the engine bay (which would require removal of engine, trailering the car, etc), I hand-painted; paint was prepared by local paint supplier using Alfa Rosso 130 paint code, in tins of 500ml (or whatever size I want); painted using a brush and finished with a small roller to achieve an even textured finish; paint dries very quickly and is relatively thick, so thinners required
*engine bay (red), parts that were resprayed (firewall/wiper cowl, top edges of quarter panels, slam panel/bonnet latch panel): these areas were masked, prepped (cleaned, sanded, wiped), and resprayed with aerosol cans of Alfa Rosso 130, produced by the same company as above; then finished with clear coat (no specific brand); the section of the slam panel is a high gloss finish that required a high quality finish because it's readily on view; after many layers of clear coat, this was carefully sanded (down to 1500 grade) to remove 'orange peel', then machine polished (I use various grades of buffing pad, and Menzerna polish including Intensive Polish and Final Finish (Menzerna seem to rename their polishes every few years so mine are older products now)); my favoured finishing wax is Pinnacle Souveran Wax Paste
*black hoses/plastics: I use various products including Poorboy's World Natural Look and Gtechniq C4 Trim Restorer
*cam covers/plenum: after cleaning, these were sprayed with VHT Wrinkle Plus

That covers most of it. If there's other parts you're interested about, let me know.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on October 03, 2012, 02:04:49 PM
good day shiny m8,
 

Are you renewing your sparkleads ?  If so would you have an aussie part number  thanks .Alphie

Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 03, 2012, 08:26:32 PM
I have a new set that I bought from Centerline, US.
https://www.centerlinealfa.com/ignition-system/1347

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on October 04, 2012, 05:52:24 PM
I found some at auto pro ;Eagle or ngk but there all blue not black .
I think it would look a bit crapy eg red car black motor blue leads?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on October 07, 2012, 04:08:29 PM
hey all found out that are very similar in construction to the alfa v6 leads.
that said; http://forums.rennlist.com/rennforums/diy-submission-forum/660129-993-beru-silicone-copper-replacement-ignition-leads.html

the Alfa spark wire is Reinshagen FZL2XG .
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 08, 2012, 02:23:39 PM
Another month, another update!  :D

Wiring is nearly all done; only a customised 'groundwire kit' that I'll create, and headlight wiring remains.

Here, the 2ga wire that passed from the battery positive terminal to the starter motor was connected to the distribution block. As such, power from the battery feeds via 0ga from the boot to the distribution block, then to the starter motor. For show, all wires to/from the block were made Stinger. I connected a short length of Stinger wire after cutting the original starter wire shorter; used a Stinger 0ga joiner.

(https://i.imgur.com/ydAd5u4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/zhlyI0h.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/f1Q7179.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GRvovL2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/t7nZKz9.jpg)

A new 'engine block' groundwire was created using black Stinger 0ga Pro Series wire. Tinned copper lugs were hex crimped onto each end.

(https://i.imgur.com/DDVm063.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/XFYtXCC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vGBUu76.jpg)

This wire serves as the groundwire for the alternator, so rather than connect to the original bolt on the engine (which was one of the PS pump bracket bolts), I secured it directly to the alternator casing via the tensioning bolt. I fitted the groundwire at the time of fitting the alternator and belt, which also drives the water pump. Connection to the chassis occurred later after completing all the +12V powerwires.

(https://i.imgur.com/cPaogc7.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lCQp43v.jpg)

I refashioned the short wiring loom that connects between the alternator and the terminal board on the side of the engine bay. This loom contained 4 wires: the main alternator output wire (original wire was 6mm^2), light green alternator output monitoring wire to the ARC computer, and two grey/red wires from the oil level sensor which is positioned in the sump near the alternator. The main output wire was upgraded to 4ga (20mm^2) and fitted separately, so the remaining 3 thinner wires were grouped together in new pvc tubing. The far end of the wires was terminated with the 3-wire plug.

(https://i.imgur.com/U09H5XB.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/FsXW6ck.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/eHiiAsZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nGWTxlD.jpg)

New alternator output wire created from red 4ga Stinger Pro wire. Lug terminal hex crimped, and wire covered by heatshrink.

(https://i.imgur.com/Peq4jNJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/WxdsCSF.jpg)

The monitoring wire and oil level sensor wires were connected. The main output wire bolted to the appropriate terminal on the alternator. All wires were then supported with 2 P-clamps which bolted to the back of the alternator.

(https://i.imgur.com/jyAsn2E.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PhWdXBs.jpg)

This powerwire originally connected directly to the battery terminal, and from my understanding, supplies the ECU and/or fuel manangement controller. A short length of red 8ga Stinger Pro wire connects this via a joiner to the distribution block.

(https://i.imgur.com/PrVdk9H.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/y0Xon4t.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lHfurP7.jpg)

The alternator and ECU powerwires are connected to the distribution block. Fuses yet to be fitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/JbTzw6h.jpg)

The power steering pump was refitted, with its new belt.

(https://i.imgur.com/GFEbAm8.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LGhfy9K.jpg)

The AC compressor belt was fitted, completing the 3 new auxiliary belts.

(https://i.imgur.com/KpppPRn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/P0fkJtk.jpg)

The belts are all new Bosch components. The model numbers reflect their specification: the 11A0850 is a 11mm wide belt of 850mm length.

(https://i.imgur.com/NI6ctLf.jpg)

The PS fluid cooling bars were cleaned and lightly resprayed, and reattached to the chassis.

(https://i.imgur.com/5s664H1.jpg)

The 3 relays at the front of the passenger side of the engine bay were refitted into position. The washer fluid motor relay is original. The other 2 are replacements, in black (originals were white and silver/metal).

(https://i.imgur.com/xEDLueH.jpg)

Next upgrade was adding 2 new relays for the headlights: lowbeam and highbeam. The relays are triggered by the original headlight wires on the passenger side; thus, these wires no longer power the H4 globe. Power to the headlights will be directly from the distribution block via the relays, for a more robust supply and should provide brighter output.

I sourced OE-spec relay holders off ebay, manufacturer is AMP, only in white. These clip to the existing holders, same locking mechanism that clips the holders to the engine bay bracket. The original headlight wires were fitted with the supplied spade terminals and locked into the holders.

(https://i.imgur.com/xPorsdI.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/eWHtpmv.jpg)

Two additional small powerwires (including power to the horns via the horn relay; the other remains a mystery to me at this stage) were also connected to the distribution block using a joiner and 8ga Stinger wire.

(https://i.imgur.com/O8pHZIj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/FoBZ3xQ.jpg)

Creating powerwires to feed the headlight relays from the distribution block: using 8ga, a joiner, then 2x 12ga wires from the joiner to the relays. Also groundwires for each relay coil.

(https://i.imgur.com/TjBXskd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Fdp6e2K.jpg)

New headlight relays (dual output SPST; these ones are white, secondhand from ebay; same 'MP' OE brand as used throughout car), fitted to the relay holders. The only remaining wires/terminals to fit are to feed the headlight globes.

(https://i.imgur.com/5v0oO6r.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/70mkEJW.jpg)

All the +12V powerwires to/from the distribution block are fitted: 0ga from the battery + 0ga to the starter motor; 100A fused 4ga from the alternator, 30A fused 8ga to the ECU/fuel management, 30A fused 8ga to the horn relay/other, 30A fused 8ga to the headlight relays. Stinger MIDI fuses used throughout.

(https://i.imgur.com/xh9aYU3.jpg)

Attaching the groundwire from the alternator to the chassis. Utilised an existing hole, enlarged to 8mm. Paint buffed/sanded down to raw metal using the Dremel and sandpaper. Wire bolted to the chassis with an 8mm titanium bolt, and carbon grease on the contact surfaces to improve connection and prevent corrosion.

(https://i.imgur.com/mVRUrok.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qkTQnQ5.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/C9XWg5I.jpg)

Replaced the passenger side, front quarter panel screws along the top inner edge. Same process as the driver side. With the screws/clips removed, the area was cleaned, sanded, and masked, then resprayed Alfa Rosso 130 and clearcoat. M6x16mm titanium bolts and captive nuts fitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/FafAi2Q.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/RBBMTnu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0v4Q1FG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/n8KGYhF.jpg)

Last task for the month was refitting the firewall trim, which I previous cleaned, dusted over with black spray paint, and removed the old, torn open cell foam rubber pieces. I posted this pic previously:

(https://i.imgur.com/ilYWuqU.jpg)

New 4mm medium density closed cell foam rubber was bought from Clark Rubber. A4 paper templates cut by trial and error, to follow the contours of the engine bay components along the bottom edge of the trim, to replace the original foam rubber. Pieces were then cut to shape, and stapled to the rear of the trim in a similar fashion to the original foam.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZY4x2cY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5MGmz8X.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/gk0uc3G.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/fyu8nOx.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/AfqnuQj.jpg)

The trim was refitted to the engine bay. The cut edges of the foam neatly surround various components and looms for a neater appearance.

(https://i.imgur.com/VBE651D.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SwHfgmJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/WwyP561.jpg)

Thanks for looking!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Sheldon McIntosh on October 08, 2012, 11:53:56 PM
Is this going to be ready for Spettacolo?  I think I speak for many when I say that I'm gagging to see it in the metal.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 09, 2012, 08:58:04 AM
Thanks Sheldon

Unfortunately, won't be anywhere near completed for 2012 Spettacolo, and I doubt it will be ready for 2013. The realistic aim is 2014 Spettacolo - well beyond my original plans. Spare time, funds (big ticket items in the future like suspension, brakes, interior retrim, etc), and being more thorough than anticipated...will blow out the time. But, all good things take time!  ;D

Richard
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on November 14, 2012, 10:56:53 AM
Monthly update time! This time, fitting air/vacuum hoses.

These are silicone plenum joiner hoses, with new stainless steel hose clamps. I've used Norma (made in Germany) clamps throughout. Silicone joiners are available through hiperformancestore.com (from whom I bought all the other hose sets), but they are considerably cheaper through International Auto Parts, US (http://www.international-auto.com/index.cfm?fa=p&pid=2459&posid=4649231).

(https://i.imgur.com/PWE7yOA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/TxS8UdV.jpg)

Plenum refitted to engine.

(https://i.imgur.com/zOLZvWe.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZUDn3P3.jpg)

The Cold Start Injector was bolted back to the plenum, and Bosch plug reconnected. Throttle Position Switch Bosch plug also reconnected.

(https://i.imgur.com/cQUXsdq.jpg)

New set of ignition leads (from Centerline, US).

(https://i.imgur.com/1I9w5CJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ErkxShL.jpg)

The rubber boot fits nicely over the original plastic distributor cover. Cable clips were used to keep the leads tidy and in position.

(https://i.imgur.com/AFHGyyN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Z1XzGOn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/8Oa43ra.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mylYLcK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/J5MyxNw.jpg)

Silicone air hoses, as part of a kit from hiperformancestore.com, come as long hoses, which require cutting to length with the supplied (cigar!) cutter. These two hoses supply addition air to the plenum from the AC solenoid, and Auxiliary Air Valve.

(https://i.imgur.com/9E1IDQ2.jpg)

These parts are from the hiperformancestore.com air intake kit. A nice silicone elbow piece with metal joiner replaces the original concertina plastic piece. The 3 ports on the original piece connected 5 hoses, requiring a couple T-pieces. The new joiner has 4 ports, so only one T-piece is required. I polished the joiner to a high shine.

(https://i.imgur.com/7go9xZK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/S5Z32VQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lQpkEIp.jpg)

These are original small air hoses, which were replaced with silicone. These include an air supply hose (top hose in photo) which passes from the air intake pipe to supply additional air to the plenum if a large vacuum exists. The vacuum is detected by a small hose on the plenum-side of the throttle body (middle hose in photo), and sucks open the vacuum regulator valve. Off this same vacuum hose is a branch to the distributor. The last hose (bottom hose in photo) supplies air to the plenum when the regulator valve is opened.

(https://i.imgur.com/gSSwOxH.jpg)

The vacuum hose featuring the branch to the distributor has a small barbed T-piece. This was reused, and the original hose replaced with silicone.

(https://i.imgur.com/jDgJa6F.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vOxfcdA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/XY55zuO.jpg)

The vacuum hose activates the vacuum regulator valve. Suddenly lifting off the accelerate slams closed the throttle body butterfly valve; this results in a sudden large vacuum on the far side of the throttle body. The vacuum hose sucks open the regulator valve, to allow air supplied from the air intake hose (near side of the throttle body) to pass into the plenum. The air passes via the fuel vapour canister for cleansing, designed to reduce emissions; waste vapours return to the fuel tank.

(https://i.imgur.com/QUgheda.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HZAMwUI.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mquv22N.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/83fR3Qw.jpg)

Air hoses connected to the air intake plenum: air supply for idling (tightening the brass connection compresses an internal O-ring, altering its calibre, and thus altering the air supply), air supply from the vacuum regulator valve, and vacuum hose to the fuel pressure regulator (higher revs/vacuum creates increased fuel pressure).

(https://i.imgur.com/rc3FFBm.jpg)

Silicone air hoses connected to the metal intake joiner: air supply to plenum for idle (top right hose), intake from oil vapour sedimenter (bottom right hose), air supply hose to T-piece to AC solenoid valve + fuel vapour canister (bottom left hose), air supply to Auxiliary Air Valve. Totals 5 hoses, including 2 via the T-piece. The vacuum hose from the throttle body connects to the distributor and vacuum regulator valve.

(https://i.imgur.com/dC3ieMw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/BYUy13u.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/f3jgpEj.jpg)

Fitment of all silicone air/vacuum hoses completed. Air intake filter and Air Flow Meter will be fitted once I receive and fit a new exhaust manifold.

(https://i.imgur.com/L1kJap8.jpg)

The original air intake snorkel was cleaned and refitted. The lower edge of the opening was slightly warped, so was tethered with a bolt to the chassis.

(https://i.imgur.com/b1CI80c.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yacdVC5.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PW9dMMD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/6Af7kea.jpg)

Thanks for looking; see you next month!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GTVeloce on November 14, 2012, 05:06:11 PM
Hi Richard

Inspiring as always! Thanks.

I was interested to see the V6's (yours at least) had an air inlet snorkel on the intake side of the engine bay. The TS 75's have a long air intake that goes right behind the radiator to the exhaust side of the engine bay to pick-up air. I have often wondered why they did this given the heat that would come from the radiator. When I get a chance I wanted to modify the intake to pickup from the intake side and this snorkel could be perfect!

Cheers
Julian
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on November 14, 2012, 05:44:31 PM
Yep, more awesome work  8).

Gunna have a little gloat  :P. Glad I have a programmable computer, it lets me get rid of a lot of those hoses  ;D.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on November 15, 2012, 11:26:20 AM
Thanks guys!

@ Duk: yeah, jealous of your aftermarket computer! It will be some years before considering a major engine upgrade, so I'll enjoy what I have for now.  :P

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: gergory on November 15, 2012, 01:18:39 PM
shiny
as always a brilliant update...........see you at spectacolo
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on November 24, 2012, 08:24:15 PM
Hi there shiny,
I noticed the bolt to hold the air inlet open , I folded a small strip of aluminum to do the same job .
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on December 16, 2012, 09:27:33 PM
December update: added some bling to the engine bay in the form of an aluminium radiator. Beautifully handcrafted in the US, bought through alfissimo (http://www.alfissimo.com/index.php?productID=318). It's about twice as thick as the original, and all-metal; the old radiator cracked its plastic inlet opening.

However, its thickness meant some fettling was required to make it fit.

Aluminium radiator built by Ron Davis, US, individually serial-numbered.

(https://i.imgur.com/s9UOXPT.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IBI2j8M.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Lm8VS19.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lycKWwC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/llugJnJ.jpg)

I polished the top brushed-metal panel to a mirror finish.

(https://i.imgur.com/cVbDle3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/b96lnvE.jpg)

Self-adhesive closed-cell foam rubber stripping stuck around the edge to seal against the car.

(https://i.imgur.com/MeCxJqA.jpg)

Radiator fan was disassembled for refurbishing and modification.

(https://i.imgur.com/HegnaJX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/F7yzE4Z.jpg)

Plastic fan sprayed with high temperature (tolerant) yellow paint.

(https://i.imgur.com/dhlbv4R.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2hQlZDl.jpg)

First fitment-issue related to the fan frame. The lower 'arm' was obstructed by the chassis crossmember, so a small section of frame was cut and removed, replaced with an aluminium bracket formed from 3mm x 19mm stripping.

(https://i.imgur.com/Ygg4SUb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/kvVBKkG.jpg)

Bracket and frame sprayed with primer and test-fitted before cutting.

(https://i.imgur.com/DffLRLC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DHNC3WR.jpg)

Cut, then sprayed with satin black before assembly.

(https://i.imgur.com/wv5p3mk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZhPFPLN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xgY7i54.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/btraTXa.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Op66Nfy.jpg)

New fan thermoswitch, which screws into the radiator to monitor coolant temperature. As stamped into the brass, this switch activates the fan when the temperature reaches 86 degrees celcius; then switches the fan off when cooled to 76 degrees. Roughly, this keeps the engine operating at around 90 degrees celcius.

(https://i.imgur.com/MENxarH.jpg)

Modified and refurbished fan bolted to the radiator. Thermoswitch screwed in position, bottom right; silicone used for a seal.

(https://i.imgur.com/KlUStBC.jpg)

3mm aluminium stripping was again used to create a bracket to secure the top of the radiator. Bracket was polished. Neoprene rubber cut to size for a cushion between bracket and radiator.

(https://i.imgur.com/SM2qfLZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/D6RXQJw.jpg)

New radiator fitted into car. Black AC condensor will eventually be replaced with an aluminium parallel-flow version of similar style to radiator.

(https://i.imgur.com/sfvtZZp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GzKCWuK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5mArPp8.jpg)

Bracket bolted into the original position. The original radiator bracket did not mate with the new radiator.

(https://i.imgur.com/OE3nyK3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/AwC0NoX.jpg)

Second issue requiring fettling was the power steering cooling bars. These needed to be set back about 3cm to make room for the thicker radiator.

(https://i.imgur.com/f3SQl3F.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HMTECk1.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9LdHW4k.jpg)

The PS cooling bars were secured using P-clamps, screwed into the original retaining holes, with the addition of plastic spacers. You can also see how the modified fan frame clears the (red) chassis crossmember.

(https://i.imgur.com/Yt0KsOt.jpg)

Final pic is a sneak peek of the new CSC stainless steel exhaust manifolds, imported for me by Wal of Euro Exhausts (http://www.euroexhausts.com.au/). Big thanks to Wal for his excellent service and pricing, again.

(https://i.imgur.com/6i7WAMW.jpg)

Thanks everyone for following my progress throughout the year. I'll keep posting after New Year, so Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on December 17, 2012, 11:46:16 AM
shiny,
How am I supposed to have a marry christmas when you have the awesome parts mate lol
I have tried to buy a set of plenum hose's. But no one will get back to me by email. it's very anoying.
I like the radiator but the headers are fantastic mate. I have put my request into Santa, We will see what comes of that.
Cheers
Shane.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: festy on December 17, 2012, 02:32:53 PM
Is that bent aluminium strap the only thing holding the radiator in? When it's full of water it will have a fair amount of inertia/momentum, it might be asking a lot for that strap to hold it's shape.
Could you fit similar straps or brackets to the sides, where the fan frame mounts to?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on December 17, 2012, 08:46:00 PM
How am I supposed to have a marry christmas when you have the awesome parts mate lol
I have tried to buy a set of plenum hose's. But no one will get back to me by email. it's very anoying.

 :D Thanks alphie!

Are you trying to buy from IAP or someone else? If IAP, just 'buy' and they'll turn up; though at this time of year, they could be a little delayed.

Is that bent aluminium strap the only thing holding the radiator in? When it's full of water it will have a fair amount of inertia/momentum, it might be asking a lot for that strap to hold it's shape.
Could you fit similar straps or brackets to the sides, where the fan frame mounts to?

Hey festy. Could be a good idea.

As it is, the radiator doesn't seem to require much 'tension' to hold it in position, as the bottom 'pronged feet' stabilise it nicely. The top radiator hose will also help hold it in position. But I understand what you're saying, and it would be easy enough to add brackets either side, secured with new holes into the car's sheet metal (albeit quite flimsy either side). So I may just take up your idea, thanks.  8)

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on January 10, 2013, 11:06:16 PM
First update for the 2013.  :)

One small job was changing the terminals on the wires connected to the thermoswitch in the radiator. The thicker aluminium radiator positioned the switch closer to the chassis crossmember, resulting in insufficient space to fit the old terminals. They were replaced with right-angle terminals; crimped, soldered, then heatshrink.

(https://i.imgur.com/QMFgrFC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dnhKg14.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/c9EIPCa.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/diQibHZ.jpg)

For the next photo, the radiator was supported with some wood to show the terminals connected.

(https://i.imgur.com/MGhOv24.jpg)

With the radiator fitted into its final position, there isn't much space and only a few millimetres clearance; perfect.

(https://i.imgur.com/EZ2eTl6.jpg)

I took on board your suggestion, festy: I constructed an identical second bracket to secure the top of the radiator. It was polished to a high shine, together with a new groundwire bus bar (see later). Two of these brackets should be more than enough to secure the radiator.

(https://i.imgur.com/KAY8Vf1.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GXkrk2B.jpg)

The first bracket was bolted where the factory bracket was originally mounted, offset to the passenger side. I wanted the second bracket offset to the driver side, the mirror image distance from the centre. A new mounting point was required, so decided to fit a rivnut (rivet nut). Rivnuts follow the same principle as normal rivets, and require compression which causes the metal to bulge out and lock the piece in position.

An M8 rivnut was used, to fit the same size 8mm bolt as the first bracket. The slam panel was carefully measured and marked, then a 10mm hole drilled, finally enlarged slightly using a Dremel/grinder to accommodate the 10.8mm diameter rivnut. I subsequently added rustproof primer.

(https://i.imgur.com/OycID5e.jpg)

Rather than buy a dedicated rivnut tool (I eventually will if I repeatedly fit rivnuts), I saw photos of a simple DIY approach using a bolt and nut: these are screwed into the rivnet, then the nut is 'unwound'. With the nut pushing against the surface of the rivnut, the bolt is forced outwards, compressing the rivnut.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZleIqsC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VpNoJ0Q.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VMAKzjF.jpg)

I experimented using a steel rivnut, but I could not generate enough force to compress using this method. So I have fitted an aluminium rivnut. This shows a successful trial using a scrap piece of aluminium as the 'panel'; the first attempt was slightly crooked, so the 'bulge' is not even circumferentially. The rivnut fitted to the car is nicely compressed!

(https://i.imgur.com/YZyFe5V.jpg)

The result is an M8 bolt hole in a bespoke position.

(https://i.imgur.com/alXbpte.jpg)

Following advice from Duk, I took the opportunity to add a rubber seal (small pinchweld seal from Clark Rubber) around the inner edge of the radiator fan frame, to seal against the surface of the radiator. The frame is designed with a gap near the bottom, interestingly offset and centred at the 5 o'clock position; I'm unclear of the exact function of this gap, whether to draw in air from underneath or allow debris to fall out.

(https://i.imgur.com/BCXdQ4F.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5GwiMiW.jpg)

Rebolted in position, the frame now seals against the radiator fins for improved fan efficiency.

(https://i.imgur.com/hjXdahf.jpg)

I then refitted the radiator, now secured with two brackets.

(https://i.imgur.com/Wo1VLu0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/c9iGPXV.jpg)

Next major job was upgrading the engine bay groundwires. I wanted a combination of improved reliability, additional groundwires from various points in the engine bay to hopefully improve the power supply to the electrics, and add some bling. Narva tin-plated copper lugs were continued to be used throughout; all wires were carefully cut and fitted for show purposes (ie: orientation of 'Stinger' labelling, etc). Conductive carbon grease was used wherever lugs were bolted. Everything is overkill, mind you!

I started by replacing the original short grounding strap between the air plenum and L cam cover using Stinger Pro 8ga (~10mm^2) black wire. You can make out the original strap in the first old photo.

(https://i.imgur.com/pLj9zmL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2jWhjUj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/78F4Xwo.jpg)

New groundwire bus bars were made from aluminium angle-bar. I determined how many groundwire attachments were required before carefully measuring and drilling. The passenger side bar has been drilled and polished, then bolted to the slam panel, using the original mounting hole plus enlarging an existing unused hole.

(https://i.imgur.com/gjRywVR.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rl4T7oQ.jpg)

All the factory small gauge groundwires plus two new headlight relay groundwires were combined into a group of 5 wires and 3 wires, and were terminated with hex crimp lugs and bolted to the bus bar.

(https://i.imgur.com/epxHWv3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qgJ0Md9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/c5cKV9A.jpg)

The main groundwire connecting the bus bar to the chassis was built from Stinger Pro 0ga black wire and Narva lugs. It was bolted to the chassis adjacent to the alternator groundwire, where a pre-existing hole was enlarged and paint removed to bare metal.

(https://i.imgur.com/1uYA9jn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Rydpsqh.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ikL1Oll.jpg)

Three 'groundwire upgrades' were added on the passenger side: from the thermostat housing + L cam cover + mounting bracket for ignition coil/module.

(https://i.imgur.com/JyC7Vc8.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Rl8g6Re.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HeFsOLj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3BEZlWJ.jpg)

These all converged on the bus bar, and were fastened using more titanium M6 bolts. The wires were neatly grouped using plastic cable clips, same as the ignition/spark plug leads.

(https://i.imgur.com/DeL8bam.jpg)

The remaining bus bar hole is for the headlight globe. To measure and fit the wiring and new H4 globe plug, the headlight was temporarily fitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/lSmY1r9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KeoEl7J.jpg)

The original H4 plugs had perished (brittle plastic), the remnants of one seen in the photo. New plugs were built, with a Stinger Pro 8ga black groundwire, and Stinger Pro 12ga black figure-8/speakerwire (spare wiring I had; conveniently provides two wires, for low and high beam). 12ga (3.3mm^2) is rated to 30~40A 'continuous'. Factory wiring is 15~16ga (1.5mm^2), 15A. Bear in mind, the 65W highbeam filament draws around 5A current.

(https://i.imgur.com/UKC2YZ5.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/8y9gu3J.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LDtDJ9r.jpg)

The passenger side groundwire bus bar completed.

(https://i.imgur.com/mFHyGsw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NZNMQQq.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/pfMi1Q2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/A3OZiqo.jpg)

Onto the driver side groundwire bus bar. As with the other side, I calculated the spacing for holes to be drilled; this was penciled onto masking tape, and the sharp tip of a screw and hammer were used to punch the centre of each hole. Pilot holes, then the final size holes were drilled; 6mm for the smaller lugs, 8mm for the main groundwire lug.

(https://i.imgur.com/aU3W7hZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ek7FltV.jpg)

Similar steps to the passenger side were taken, and the factory groundwires were fitted as two groups.

(https://i.imgur.com/cO1kikD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/l91vfpu.jpg)

Pre-existing chassis hole was enlarged, and paint sanded away to bare metal for the main 0ga groundwire.

(https://i.imgur.com/mat23M6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/q6Y8sJM.jpg)

Another three 'groundwire upgrades' were added on the driver side: near the distributor + AAV groundwire point; later, I fitted one from the airflow meter.

(https://i.imgur.com/krpkJZY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/uOOQgNo.jpg)

New headlight wiring was built, with the headlight temporarily fitted to measure the wiring lengths. For this side, the powerwires were longer, to pass from the headlight relays on the passenger side. Stinger Pro 12ga blue speakerwire was used.

(https://i.imgur.com/FhRa6vL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tnIRopp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/J4sxtos.jpg)

The wires connect to the headlight relays, then pass over the radiator tucked behind the radiator brackets, ending in the H4 plug. The relays are dual output: from the highbeam relay are a black + blue wire for L + R highbeam power; lowbeam relay also has separate black + blue wires for L+ R lowbeam.

(https://i.imgur.com/HhvhM9h.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7QsC0Oa.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/R20MYUV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/AkQMKDq.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/hT9bb2k.jpg)

The final groundwire fitted was from the airflow meter. I temporarily fitted the AFM, supported by a box, to measure the wire.

(https://i.imgur.com/fXNP7Iw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ShLQdQN.jpg)

Driver side groundwire bus bar completed. The new additional wires are grouped with cable clips.

(https://i.imgur.com/BtdKzc9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yjeHmjm.jpg)

The airflow meter and air filter will not be permanently fitted until the exhaust manifolds are ceramic coated and bolted in position; something I will arrange over the coming months.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Al Campbell on January 11, 2013, 10:53:22 AM
Great works as usual. I hope the alloy parts of that AFM get polished before it goes in for good!

Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on January 11, 2013, 11:02:41 AM
WOW look very nice .
But it's going to be a bitch to clean mate .
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Sheldon McIntosh on January 11, 2013, 04:50:36 PM
Better start again, one of those lugs on the passenger side doesn't line up....

Stunning work as always, congrats.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on January 12, 2013, 01:43:49 PM
 ;D Thanks guys!

AFM will need cleaning, and I think polishing the metal is a good idea.  8)

Hey Alphie: you can come over and help clean it for me.  :P  ;)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on January 12, 2013, 03:57:46 PM
how many tooth bush have you budgetted for mate .lol ;D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Mick A on January 13, 2013, 02:41:52 AM
Amazing work and attention to detail!

Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on February 14, 2013, 11:49:09 AM
Thanks Choderboy - much appreciated!

A relatively small update for the past month. Though, mostly because some of the jobs were time consuming rather than lack of time spent on the car!

This marks the start of working underneath. First task was dropping the exhaust; the manifolds had long been removed, leaving the front pipes, centre section and rear muffler in place. Two decades of heat and grime, the front section was seized to the centre pipe. Removing the flanged front pipes, out from the gap between the engine and chassis, normally requires some manoeuvring; this was impossible when still connected to the centre pipe. I determined the quickest route was cutting one of the front pipes, bending slightly, then dropping it directly down; this section will be discarded and of no use to me again, so no loss. I will tackle the join to the centre pipe another time.

(https://i.imgur.com/yGihISQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HyeLpU4.jpg)

Now there was access to the rear engine mount and heatshield above the catalytic converter. Removing the heatshield gives access to the propeller shaft, and I found a split rubber boot over the gearshift linkage that will need replacing.

(https://i.imgur.com/RhTvNW6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/S7x7IA0.jpg)

Next was removing the rear engine mount. I discovered lowering this down sufficiently to 'slide' the mount sideways required some trial and error: with the two 'side' engine mount bolts loosened, jacking the front of the engine (from front edge of oil sump) pivoted the engine and dipped the rear mount. I was initially puzzled when jacking the front as far as possible dipped the rear inadequately, only to see that it was lifting the entire engine! A little strange, but jacking the front partway dipped the rear the most, beyond which everything was lifted. Also jacking from one side (front corner of the oil sump) rotated the engine on a small sideways angle which was helpful. Perhaps not all 3.0 engines behave like this.

(https://i.imgur.com/AJGHuM2.jpg)

Advice from these forums confirmed I needed a new 'tool' to remove the engine mount! Any excuse, but I bought a cheap air compressor from Supercheap Auto; this is their high flow (180L/min) model, which was on special for $169. Cheap enough to 'try', and if I find having a compressor very useful, I will invest in a good quality version in the future. Quality, flexible hoses were purchased off ebay; Stanley air tools (air hammer + impact wrench) also from SCA (Stanley air tools have been dropped from their website, so the instore stock may be all that remains); plus additional Nitto style quick release couplings, and a water vapour remover plus oil supply.

(https://i.imgur.com/Hf4vxYa.jpg)

Straight-up, the air hammer was insufficient to budge the mount. What worked was a combination of Inox penetrating oil soaked overnight plus heating the bell housing with a heat gun (I don't have a blow torch which would have been more effective). That was enough to get things started, and from there, the air hammer gradually 'whacked' it out. Whilst it was kinda fun, in my untrained hands (plus lying on my stomach on the ground under the car!), I managed to scratch and dent the soft alloy bell housing; nothing terrible, but obviously not ideal.

Refitting a new engine mount is for another day.

(https://i.imgur.com/doCi4tz.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/luz5IMH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yvqxRDN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/MpNgLCw.jpg)

Time to clean the underside of the engine and chassis. I had previously removed the oil sump bottom cover, and degreased and high pressure hosed, so that was already clean. But plenty of oil stains, grease, and grime everywhere else.

(https://i.imgur.com/wHJ8fIL.jpg)

One oily area of potential concern is just infront of the flywheel, best seen with the lower guard (first photo) removed. My understanding is that this (better scenario) could be oil from above, say a spray of oil from a failed oil pressure sensor; but (worse scenario) could be oil from the 'rear main' seal where the crankshaft passes out from the engine block to the flywheel. The latter is an 'engine out' procedure to replace. At this stage, I will simply keep an eye on whether the oil reaccumulates; if it's the rear main seal, hopefully not a bad leak, and I can wait a few years of driving.

(https://i.imgur.com/IsHSDPA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/D5Zsi8p.jpg)

Most of the area degreased and cleaned. Much of the factory 'chassis paint' has been scraped away, leaving only the grey primer. This will all be repainted with deadener. I found five (arrows) plastic screw plugs that appear to be fitted in factory holes; these are forward of the cat converter heatshield screw plugs. I've not seen photos or reference in the parts catalogue to an additional shield/undertray being fitted here (though it would seem quite reasonable to have one), so I am confused why these plugs exist; perhaps someone can shed light on this? I have removed the plugs, and the holes will be covered and painted.

(https://i.imgur.com/Fnl9xgX.jpg)

Here is a sump guard, made by fellow Alfista 'alphie75'. A nice piece of work; pre-drilled holes in the front arms attach to factory bolts holding the front antiroll bar. I needed to test fit and align, then drill rear holes to bolt to the chassis. 'Rivnuts' are again the perfect solution to adding securing points; 10mm holes were drilled in the chassis, and enlarged slightly with the Dremel to accommodate M8 rivnuts (to be fitted later).

Once the car is lowered, ground clearance could be a big issue. The guard will lose an extra 2-3cm of clearance, and may leave only 5cm (!) but hopefully more. I will re-evaluate when all is completed, but the guard may need to be deleted and risk sump damage.

(https://i.imgur.com/yduyaJZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9VE9jVD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/L6bAwHV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yBMDKAR.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3natrnO.jpg)

Back into the engine bay for some minor work. This is a heavily corroded coolant pipe joiner; the T-piece fits between the main hose(s) that passes from the radiator outlet (bottom of radiator) to the thermostat housing (inlet to thermostat housing and water pump). The small-diameter side pipe is a feeder from the coolant expansion tank.

After wire-brushing the corrosion, the joiner was clearly in poor condition. I have replaced this with a new aluminium T-piece off ebay; it is a generic part, but matches the original (38mm outer diameter for main hoses; 19mm OD for side hose). Determining any electrolysis issues will definitely be performed once the engine is up and running to ensure the joiner (and radiator) is not at risk of being 'eaten'.

(https://i.imgur.com/GM2xaaS.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Je8FRWW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DCbqjsC.jpg)

The new T-piece was a little roughly constructed, but easily 'cleaned up' with some filing. And it already came pre-polished.

(https://i.imgur.com/HCDAhrm.jpg)

New silicone hose fitted to the radiator outlet, then T-piece clamped in position. The hose between the T-piece and thermostat housing to be added later. Smaller-diameter silicone hose fitted, which passes from the coolant expansion tank (not directly; it is connected to a small plastic T-piece and receives coolant from the expansion tank and return-coolant from the cabin heater core).

(https://i.imgur.com/BLRDwSM.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4kyfw6Y.jpg)

And finally, some teaser-pics! A Christmas present to myself: 'carbon fibre' bonnet and bootlid, from the US. These were produced as a small batch (26 pieces total (not sets)), specially commissioned by an Alfista (John, aka 'junglejustice') on the alfabb.com forums, and this set purchased by another Alfista but never used. They are part fibreglass, part-CF; fit and finish is excellent, and made to accept the original hardware (ie: integrated nuts to bolt to the factory hinges, etc). Not flawless, but a careful machine-polish should remove minor swirls. Clearcoat is UV-stable. I personally think 'full' CF looks a little silly, so I plan to have both pieces partially sprayed in body colour (red), and leave 'patches' of CF on show; I will put some thought into the design, but nothing intricate, just neat. I haven't weighed them yet.

No plans to fit them until the car is virtually completed, so into storage they go! Yes, they cost a pretty penny, especially once shipping was accounted for. I believe this is not the only set in Australia.

(https://i.imgur.com/y3xWr4O.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Y6mPkvD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xxJw0kX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0fNdFoQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/21vSYTY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nOr6YZZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/cEsd68X.jpg)

See you next month!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on February 14, 2013, 02:15:12 PM
wow that's a very  :)  exciting  ;D   installment  ;)look'n very cool
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: john m on February 14, 2013, 04:50:49 PM
"leave patches of CF on show"

like this perhaps, an article from Auto Italia issue 157 May '09.  That would create a stunning effect, a standard to match what lies under the hood. Andrew keep up the good work and thanks for posting.

http://www.flickriver.com/photos/michaelwardphotos/3403189843/
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Evan Bottcher on February 14, 2013, 09:17:55 PM
Strewth!  Tough call - I think the CF would look great, definitely over the top though so up to your taste.

Can you tell us the weight difference between the steel and GRP/CF bonnet/boots?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on February 15, 2013, 09:44:50 AM
Thanks guys. And it's Richard, not Andrew.  ;D

From that same article, I really like the paint job on the black 75. Its bonnet appears to be CF, but without the 'finishing layer', and with a raw look instead. Its pattern of painting looks good too and probably more like what I have in mind.
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8236/8474811809_3cc926cf98_z.jpg

But yes, both those cars have been an inspiration to me all along.  8)

Can you tell us the weight difference between the steel and GRP/CF bonnet/boots?

I haven't done a weigh-in of my own parts yet. But from the discussions on alfabb.com, the approx weights are:

bonnet: original ~18kg, CF ~8kg
boot: original ?9kg, CF ~4kg

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on March 12, 2013, 09:39:44 PM
For this month's update, I started with repositioning the aircon's receiver-dryer. With the new, thicker radiator, the trinary switch - screwed into the top of the receiver-dryer, was obstructed. So the receiver-dryer, and its bracket, were relocated about 20mm further back.

The receiver-dryer is plumbed inline on the high pressure side of the AC system, and its primary function is to remove moisture/water from the refrigerant pumped through the system. I have a new receiver-dryer, but an AC specialist is required to degas the system before uncoupling the hoses, so it's a job for the future. Screwed into the head of the receiver-dryer is the trinary switch, which monitors the pressure in the system.

This is the trinary switch that was fitted to the car. I figure it was a replacement switch, and there were two minor issues:
1. the wires were simply 'twist and tape' connections; poor reliability
2. the coloured plugs were on the wrong wires (second photo); even though it was a cosmetic issue, it was quick and easy to release the terminals from the plastic plugs to swap around

(https://i.imgur.com/yxlIUXa.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yHyDBwU.jpg)

New trinary switch. I soldered the original wires/plugs to the new switch, plus heatshrink insulation. Then swapped the wires to the correct plugs (ie: black wires in red plug; blue wires in white plug).

(https://i.imgur.com/mwcC37b.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/fAKHKXg.jpg)

Note the pressure specs:
LP (low pressure): 2.0 kg/cm^2; if the system loses refrigerant pressure, the switch opens and the compressor (clutch) cuts out
HP (high pressure): 26.5 kg/cm^2; if system overheats and pressure goes too high, the switch opens and the compressor cuts out
MP (medium pressure): 17 kg/cm^2; over this pressure, a second switch closes and turns on the radiator fan to increase air flow over the condensor and help cool the system and keep pressure in check

(https://i.imgur.com/Boj5HU7.jpg)

The bracket securing the receiver-dryer was riveted to the chassis. A fairly simple matter of drilling out the rivets and drilling new holes to reposition. The bracket was repositioned about 20mm back, but also higher, and this time bolted to the chassis. I don't know how tall the original receiver-dryer was, but both the current and replacement are a standard 2.5" x 6" unit. As such, the bracket was fitted down too low, leaving the receiver-dryer clamped around the bottom.

The new position seats the receiver-dryer properly within the bracket. Once fitted, the old holes were patched with JB Weld, and the area repainted, and fuel vapour canister refitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/Sa4Vrcu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YP6HkDF.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xSiymhq.jpg)

Inside the engine bay, the receiver-dryer was clamped in place. The trinary switch screwed into the head, with adequate clearance from the radiator.

(https://i.imgur.com/tbzN7wa.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/XEMkWbM.jpg)

Moving onto the front suspension...

Front antiroll bar removed.

(https://i.imgur.com/1swV42W.jpg)

Starting with the front right (caster rod and shock absorber previously removed). Cap and split-pin removed from hub, and castle nut being removed.

(https://i.imgur.com/Bqn8Et5.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/U2Fel0W.jpg)

Brake caliper unbolted and suspended out of the way, with no tension through brake hose. Hub and brake disc slid off the axle with bearings. Brake disc guard unbolted and removed.

(https://i.imgur.com/jmIC40Z.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jmIC40Z.jpg)

At 'full drop', further movement is stopped by the upper arm contacting the steering knuckle.

(https://i.imgur.com/fLz6Er9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mkJu3sQ.jpg)

To adjust suspension height (ie: for me to lower the front), distance was measured from an arbitrary position above (underside of box section) to a point on the lower control arm (LCA). In these photos, the suspension remains bolted together, preloaded (ie: 'spring loaded'). I forgot to take a photo with the LCA released (ie: unloaded), and in its resting position. Marking an arbitrary point on the LCA, in the preloaded position the distance was 627mm.

(https://i.imgur.com/WtAvv5g.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/XFIHMZl.jpg)

To separate the suspension arms from the steering knuckle, it is dangerous without taking away the preloaded tension. Thus, a hydraulic jack lifted and supported the steering knuckle from underneath, taking tension off the upper balljoint. A balljoint separator was positioned, ready to push the balljoint shank up from the knuckle. A plastic bag covered the grease on the axle.

(https://i.imgur.com/3bdMKCP.jpg)

Upper balljoint safely separated from the steering knuckle. The jack was put aside, and the LCA dropped further down, unloaded. I measured the distance from the body above to the same point on the LCA as before, 668mm (again, no photo). This is an important reference; to lower the car, I will refit the LCA at a lesser distance.

(https://i.imgur.com/uXBTHxg.jpg)

Outer tie rod end (steering arm) separated from the steering knuckle.

(https://i.imgur.com/mL3mWp4.jpg)

Working on the lower balljoint. Notice the small gap between the rim of the balljoint (rusty brown) and LCA. Whilst it makes no difference, this gap shouldn't exist and suggests the balljoint (presumably a replacement) was not seated properly. They are apparently very tight and tough to fit...without the right tools.

(https://i.imgur.com/mBFTDfv.jpg)

Steering knuckle removed from lower balljoint. And penetrating oil sprayed into the gap to prepare for removal of balljoint from LCA.

(https://i.imgur.com/nJrOLXm.jpg)

But the gap has its advantage! As tough as it is to press the balljoint into the LCA, it's difficult to remove. One technique I read about was jamming some form of wedge into the gap, whilst forcing the balljoint out from above with a 3-prong puller. Here, a large flat screwdriver was jammed into the gap, using a hammer. Note that only 2 of the puller's prongs were having a beneficial effect; the outer prong was actually applying force on the balljoint to push it back into the LCA! That was the only practical method, and it worked fine!

As the gap widened, my 'wedge' was changed from a screwdriver to a chisel, then to a cheap and nasty balljoint separator fork (I gave up on these when I bought the proper balljoint separator). The fork has proved useful for something.  :lol:

(https://i.imgur.com/qEgEXSp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/uGfE7sz.jpg)

Old lower balljoint removed, alongside new replacement. The old one was still in reasonable condition, but all the moving parts will be replaced.

(https://i.imgur.com/LH4KlgX.jpg)

Upper control arm (UCA) removed from chassis. The upper balljoint was riveted to the UCA from the factory. The shock absorber passes through the large central hole. UCA appears to be contructed from two pressed metal pieces, spot welded together.

(https://i.imgur.com/cQjXjW3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/BXygxcE.jpg)

An angle grinder was used to shave away the rivet heads, before hammering out with a punch. Old balljoint removed, alongside new replacement.

(https://i.imgur.com/rQw1tVi.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/RXNj7FB.jpg)

Original rubber bush pressed out from UCA using vice and socket piece. The bush showed signs of perishing, and had distorted.

(https://i.imgur.com/tChKMtU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HilPUUQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZFSukLf.jpg)

Stripping wheel on angle grinder used to remove surface corrosion and paint on UCA. Then resprayed, first with etch primer, filler, then gloss black enamal.

(https://i.imgur.com/u8bUhPu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JWdOklO.jpg)

Next task: removing the torsion bar.

This tool was made/sold by UK Alfista AlfaHaze, who occasionally offers them on ebay. The tool screws into the end of the torsion bar via the black stud; then rotating the big nut forces the big bolt and torsion bar out (same principle as fixing rivnuts).

(https://i.imgur.com/Y8pXzVp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ib7VEkv.jpg)

The rear ends of the torsion bars are locked into this chassis brace midway under the car. Protective cap removed, to expose the end of the torsion bar. The tool screws into the threaded end of the bar, and you can see the splined hole that the splined end of the bar locks into.

(https://i.imgur.com/bFrc7EJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HnwyJZh.jpg)

Extraction tool connected to torsion bar, then nut gradually turned.

(https://i.imgur.com/NDdEhhF.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sSd93Ok.jpg)

The splined front of the torsion bar extracted from the LCA. After the LCA was unbolted from the chassis, the torsion bar could be punched torwards the front of the car again, and out of the rear hole.

(https://i.imgur.com/jph76pt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/avOd1Zd.jpg)

LCA unbolted from the chassis. M10x125mm bolts secure the support bar to the chassis, and the LCA rotates on the bar. LCA 'cleaned' with wire brush on drill.

(https://i.imgur.com/7scGqtG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2Yy6Zse.jpg)

I finally reached the stage I could not do without a hydraulic press! Until now, I had used a vice to press out bushes and various pieces, which worked nicely. Various attempts to remove the support bar and bushes from the LCA failed (vice, puller, heat, penetrating oil, etc); I probably could have succeeded with perseverence and lots of swearing, but I knew a press was the proper tool required, and will prove invaluable for many future applications.

This is a 20 ton hydraulic press. Relatively cheap, and basic build quality, but ideal for an enthuasiast like myself for occasional use. Fairly small footprint too, so doesn't take up much space; I'm mindful of working in a temporary garage, so all this gear will need moving in a couple years.

(https://i.imgur.com/WPtCY5G.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rQDl6Yz.jpg)

With the LCA carefully supported, a deep socket piece was 'pressed' against the end of the support bar. A moderate amount of force popped the bushes from their seated positions, but it was a very easy process! The press was worth its cost for this alone!  :D

From the second photo, the large retaining nut and lock ring were unscrewed from the front end of the LCA to allow the support bar and bushes to pass out; these help secure the bar in position from that end.

(https://i.imgur.com/vso7sbJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/RmRpwQc.jpg)

New versus old bushes. After removing nuts from each end of the support bar, the bushes simply slide off by hand. The old bushes still felt solid, and the LCA was rotating smoothly around the the bar. But you can see that one end of a bush was 'mashed', probably during fitment; and the outer collar of the other heavily gouged.

I was curious about the construction of the bushes, and found the second photo on the internet. The inner spherical collar rotates inside the outer metal collar, supported by a nylon bush. They seem very solid, and should last a long time.

(https://i.imgur.com/0BgZveU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/aGUnIxd.jpg)

That's it for the past month! I will now continue to refurbish the suspension parts, replace every bush and balljoint, clean and paint the wheel arch, then reassemble! Then the joys of the left side! But I'm genuinely enjoying this part of the restoration.

Thanks for reading.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: david sammartino on March 12, 2013, 09:52:34 PM
So does this mean seeing as youll be refitting the torsion bars, youll be fitting the new rims so as to get the height set and save extra work later. I ask because i just cant wait to see the wheels on :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on March 13, 2013, 09:14:07 PM
Hey Dave

To me, fitting the wheels is like adding the cherry on the top; it's one of the very last details to do!  :P But really, they are just bare wheels, no tyres on them at the moment, and will first be refurbed/repainted. However, yes, I will to a mock-up fitment by bolting them on, supported on blocks, and try to gauge the stance. I'll do that once the suspension on the L is completed.  :D

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: aggie57 on March 14, 2013, 08:29:34 AM
You need a job writing work instructions or the like.  Your efforts at capturing and documenting your work are to be commended.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Brad M on March 14, 2013, 10:38:38 AM
You need a job writing work instructions or the like.  Your efforts at capturing and documenting your work is to be commended.....!
Agreed, very impressive.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on March 14, 2013, 06:59:07 PM
Just a note on the LCA ball joint.
I've never seen them fully seated on the parallel surfaces, before. Not the original ones and not after I've fitted new ones.

And I hope you cleaned the splines for the torsion bars and gave them some anti seize before putting them back together.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on March 15, 2013, 09:08:58 AM
You need a job writing work instructions or the like.  Your efforts at capturing and documenting your work is to be commended.....!

Agreed, very impressive.

Thanks guys. Yeah, I like to make it an 'informative journey', which hopefully anyone can follow with some interest.

I've never seen them fully seated on the parallel surfaces, before. Not the original ones and not after I've fitted new ones.

And I hope you cleaned the splines for the torsion bars and gave them some anti seize before putting them back together.

Ah, cheers Duk. I had wondered if the balljoints seat completely into the LCA, and had presumed they should. I won't fret when the new ones don't!

Yeah, need to clean up the torsion bars; wire-brush the splines to clean any gunk from the grooves, and copper grease at the ready!  ;D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GTVeloce on March 15, 2013, 10:03:48 AM
As Duk said, I have never had one completely mate up. I can feel it bottoming out and yet there is still always a gap. That said, the gap for me is usually only 1-2mm. Just enough for my cold chisel when I want to remove them!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Sheldon McIntosh on March 15, 2013, 03:41:00 PM
Since you have it all apart anyway, are you going to put on the ball-joint risers?  Apologies if you've mentioned this before, I don't read what you've written, I just look at the wonderful photos!!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on March 15, 2013, 08:29:34 PM
As Duk said, I have never had one completely mate up. I can feel it bottoming out and yet there is still always a gap. That said, the gap for me is usually only 1-2mm. Just enough for my cold chisel when I want to remove them!

Thanks, good to know!  :)

Since you have it all apart anyway, are you going to put on the ball-joint risers?

I haven't mentioned it yet; still haven't decided. I've read about (upper) balljoint risers, and drop spindles. I've a basic grasp on various effects on camber during cornering, roll centres, and roll axis. I am considering drop spindles, but not balljoint risers, and I will be lowering the car considerably (exact distance yet to be confirmed).

My plan has always been to fit the RS Racing suspension kit, which includes front coilvoers, and use the original 1" torsion bars. From everything I've read, it is claimed that this packages works wonderfully with the standard front suspension setup, for which it was designed. And by minimising body roll, the adverse effects of positive camber on the outer wheel are negated.

I've read nothing to confirm that RS Racing + drop spindles is a bad combination. It makes sense to me that drop spindles should help. The only potential issue is whether the coilover has enough travel to extend further once the LCA is reset from the 'pointing up' position to 'horizontal/pointing down'; can't see it being a problem.

At the end of the day, the car will be a rarely-driven street car, and not see the track, so I will not be chasing maximum performance. But of course I want it to handle nicely, and be predictable, and not catch me out (with wild oversteer or more likely terrible plough understeer). As such, drop spindles may be 'poor value for money' for my requirements when combined with the RSR setup. Hence, I think I will start with just the RSR suspension, then re-evaluate.

Because the RSR kit is expensive, I don't foresee purchasing it for a year or two, and may be one of the last things fitted before the car hits the road. But it won't be driven until it's done.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: barts on March 15, 2013, 09:03:10 PM
Hi Shiny,

I have been watching your amazing build online. I don't have the drop spindles, just RSR setup on a 3.0 12v GTV6. Your welcome to come take it for a drive or grab any measurements if you like. I'm about an hr north of Melbourne at Pucka.

Dan
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on March 16, 2013, 01:35:14 AM
Thanks Dan! I appreciate the offer, and once my car is up and running with it fitted, I may take up the offer to compare.

How low is your GTV6? Are the front lower control arms 'pointing upwards'? And what spring rates did you go with?

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: barts on March 18, 2013, 08:54:18 PM
Hi Shiny,

My car is still set to just greater than 14cm clearance... lowest point is about the central resonator / muffler. This makes driving on the road a no brainer and keeps moving it with CEVA every couple of years easy.

The lower arms are just about level but angled slightly up to the wheels (photo is a bit low and deceptive). I have it set that way with the torsion bars so I could maybe go down 1cm or so but tons of room to go up. If it was dedicated to the track I think a 2-3cm drop would be fine.

The rear shockies on the kit are very short. I have my rear set about as high as it can reasonably go and the rear wheel sits about 1cm above (into) the wheel arch (GTV6). The front tyre is about 3cm below the arch. Ron Recommends the rear ride height 1cm above the front and my car is about level (jack points) despite the difference in wheel arch gap so a 1cm drop at the front would probably put it at its highest recommended setting. 

My springs are 115kg front and 60 rear. When I bought these I had Targa aspirations so Ron recommended that intermediate sort of rate with the 30mm front roll bar. It rides pretty well at highway speeds on reasonable roads and is fantastic on the track, but I haven't really driven it anywhere else to compare. 

Hope that helps.

Dan

Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on March 19, 2013, 02:02:39 PM
Thanks Dan. Good info. I also saw your topic about the car (for sale); good luck with that, and pity it has to go.

Cheers, Richard.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 12, 2013, 09:32:20 PM
The past month, I made a little bit of progress. Each step has been fairly time consuming, particularly thoroughly cleaning 20+ years of grime from the main components.

The LCA (lower control arm) and support bar were sprayed with primer then finished in gloss black.

(https://i.imgur.com/fPOdrFr.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5q4xRAd.jpg)

Then fitted new bushes. This required packing the LCA with '6g' of grease, according to the workshop manual. I've used Penrite Molygrease EP 3%, and scooped out 6g with the aide of the SPAM scales!

(https://i.imgur.com/9CVI8E1.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/15fDPzx.jpg)

The rear bush was fitted to the support bar, then driven into position by the hydraulic press. The tub of grease was also helpful in propping the LCA in position!

(https://i.imgur.com/JTPL6Uw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/RXivWQB.jpg)

New bush pressed into front of LCA. Another 6g of Molygrease packed into the void inside the end of the LCA after the bush was fitted, then the 'lock ring' and 'retaining nut' refitted, and all torqued to spec.

(https://i.imgur.com/Zl5nscd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HUy4FFA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/H3ZIu6C.jpg)

The lock ring and nut, and the spacers (which bolt between the chassis and support bar) were then primed and also sprayed black. Completed, ready for fitment to the car.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZtWwXoR.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OWFkMvJ.jpg)

Next, cleaned the torsion bar. Standard bar, 24mm diameter x 932mm long. One thing I discovered was a rubber sleeve covering the bars! It was so dirty that it did not feel or appear to be rubber. Here it is, with one end rolled back for demonstration. The splines are dirty because the bar had been sitting on the floor of the garage a few weeks.

(https://i.imgur.com/GiZ7wen.jpg)

After a thorough scrub with soapy water and a scourer, it looked completely different and fresh :D (shown before, photo of dirty bar (http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL166/13567593/24281407/405713147.jpg)). Found the original wrap-around blue decal with 'R'. The workshop manual describes the right-side bar as: "blue mark and letter D or R". That may account for the blue paint adjacent to the decal but unsure about the red paint (left-side bar meant to have yellow, so I will find out later). The rear end of the bar has a 'D' stamped into it.

(https://i.imgur.com/q9O5qK2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qGXqxVG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sDGSEHT.jpg)

The wheel arch was next. Plenty of accumulated dirt lodged into various areas and crevices; this is behind the plastic wheel arch liner that will be refitted later. I decided the quickest effective cleaning method was spraying degreaser then using the Karcher high pressure hose - despite being inside the garage! Don't ask about having water everywhere   ::) .

(https://i.imgur.com/igf1cH7.jpg)

Given a good wash, used an old toothbrush in some crevices, then dried and wiped. Zinc Cold Gal Primer rust proofer was applied to any exposed metal and allowed to cure for a couple weeks.

(https://i.imgur.com/qgR7MGO.jpg)

Painted, using enamel satin black paint in the boxed sections, and 3M Body Deadener on the remainder of the arch/chassis.

(https://i.imgur.com/KToODAu.jpg)

This is self-adhesive clear film for general purpose protection (eg: sold as bicycle frame protection patches). I bought this to cover over some of the redundant holes in the chassis rails. I cut small patches and stuck them in place, aided by gentle heat from a heat gun. They will be painted over.

I presume some of the holes are for 'airing' and drainage, or maybe for manufacturing purposes. But they seem quite random, and allow water and grime to accumulate inside. I left only a couple big holes and covered the remainder.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZyU6dXj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/n1M9RkG.jpg)

Disc brake splash guard, grubby and corroded. Then cleaned with wax & grease remover, then wire brushed to remove corrosion.

(https://i.imgur.com/xhxjbLO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nwHQ8PT.jpg)

Sprayed with primer, then satin black high temperature-resistant engine enamel, given its proximity to the brake disc.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZRXwAI3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jZTFAmx.jpg)

Steering knuckle, before cleaning. Wiped with wax & grease remover, then wire brushed, ready for respraying.

(https://i.imgur.com/3JG2ifE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/G3HWjZb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vPaTvA9.jpg)

So this coming month, I'll respray the steering knuckle, refurb a couple of the remaining components, then start to reassemble the suspension.

Thanks for looking!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on May 08, 2013, 09:26:50 PM
The past month has seen most of the front right suspension completed. Having done one side, I then had the left front suspension totally stripped well within 2 hours, without rushing.

The front right steering knuckle sprayed with primer then gloss black paint.

(https://i.imgur.com/37K524d.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/P3kjOgC.jpg)

Back under the car, I removed the right chassis brace.

(https://i.imgur.com/1mKA7ou.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GTc1qvP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PpnlIQP.jpg)

Then scrubbed everything with a scourer to remove a couple decades of grime.

(https://i.imgur.com/3rlbkcf.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ewcR1xl.jpg)

The area was painted with body deadener with brace refitted. I will remove the side skirt later to paint right to the edge, and eventually the whole underside will be cleaned and painted.

(https://i.imgur.com/TcDeG3o.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/q6eLqJz.jpg)

The inner tie rod joint felt in good condition (inside the rubber boot), so I have not replaced this. The outer tie rod ball joint also felt smooth, but easy to replace and I noticed the edge of the protective rubber boot was splitting.

(https://i.imgur.com/7fXuT99.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/X6J6qzr.jpg)

The tie rod was cleaned, masked, and resprayed in situ. The concertina rubber boot was rejuvenated with Autoglym Bumper & Trim Gel.

(https://i.imgur.com/42h8RP3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PC79P1c.jpg)

Time to reassemble!  :D

New bolts to mount the LCA to the chassis, as similar spec as OE that I could readily find: M12x130mm, 8.8 tensile strength, thread pitch 1.5mm per turn (OE = M12x125mm, 8.8, 1.25mm).

(https://i.imgur.com/xDf61TO.jpg)

Setting the new front rideheight: I previously determined I wanted approximately a 70mm drop. The distance from a marked point above to a marked point on the end of the LCA was originally 668mm; thus I refitted the torsion bar with the LCA at 598mm. This was achieve by supporting the end of the LCA with a hydraulic jack at this distance, then inserting the torsion bar; splines needed to line-up front and rear, then the bar was gently hammered home.

(https://i.imgur.com/Q5tgCdG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/wvD7tus.jpg)

With the torsion bar fitted, the distance was confirmed. OK, 1mm out is good enough: 597mm.

(https://i.imgur.com/V8ju5ml.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/aYj6X8x.jpg)

More photos of the LCA bolted to the chassis with torsion bar refitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/AW2J2Z7.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GrIzgcy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NwgZaug.jpg)

To fit the new lower balljoint into the LCA, I bought a generic tool.

(https://i.imgur.com/BDSxYmT.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZOGWSQM.jpg)

However, I could not generate enough force to press the balljoint as far as required. Live and learn - took the LCA off the car again and did the job properly with the 20 ton press! At least the pieces from the tool kit remained useful. And I can confirm - as other owners pointed out to me recently - there remains a small gap between the balljoint flange and LCA; it's just meant to be! Next time, on the other side, I'll remember to fit the balljoint before fitting the LCA to the car.  ::)

(https://i.imgur.com/8iJaNaV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VGTVrbG.jpg)

Refitting the upper control arm (UCA) using a Superflex polyurethane (PU) bush instead of the OE style rubber bush. And new bolt, OE-spec 8.8 tensile strength.

(https://i.imgur.com/kyGwvrd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/6p8sXve.jpg)

Passing the bolt through the bush from inside the engine bay was very awkward - I had been forewarned by various forum comments. Plus, to help hold and guide the bolt I was using a 17mm socket piece; I should not have let this go from my hand, as it dropped into a deep chassis pocket...not to be seen again! I'm surely not the only person to have ever done this.  :o

(https://i.imgur.com/n4Ro4e6.jpg)

New upper balljoint bolted to the UCA.

(https://i.imgur.com/iLoL2pC.jpg)

Castle nuts and split pins are an elegant solution to preventing nuts from undoing. But the nut supplied with the new upper balljoint was too tall to line up the slots with the pin hole; so I reused the original.

(https://i.imgur.com/lJ4Uja2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/X5BxHRl.jpg)

The steering knuckle was refitted, bolted to the upper and lower balljoints and new tie rod end, all secured with castle nuts and split pins. I removed the plastic bag and grease from the axle stub.

(https://i.imgur.com/iszFDEl.jpg)

Caster rod, joiner, and new balljoint flange were cleaned and sprayed with primer then gloss black.

(https://i.imgur.com/sETLVji.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tXMQO6I.jpg)

Balljoint bolted to the chassis pocket with the supplied hardware.

(https://i.imgur.com/hUGjlyT.jpg)

Fitting the retaining bolt at the rear end of the caster rod required the UCA to be pushed back, to line up bolt with hole. I used the handle from my old hydraulic jack for leverage, and a couple cloths to prevent damage to the paint.

(https://i.imgur.com/NoSUPcG.jpg)

Caster rod fitted, reusing the original rear bolt which has a lock nut and split pin. The new balljoint provides a slightly longer threaded section compared with the original piece; it is currently wound-in as far as possible for the shortest length. I compared the total length between original and new, and the new rod is 5mm longer. This will result in more caster angle for the steering knuckle, which is something I am already aiming for (ie: 5-6 degrees instead of factory 4.5 degrees). If the current setting is too high, I will need to cut the balljoint thread shorter, but the wheel alignment is some time off in the distant future!

(https://i.imgur.com/t5u7cKa.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sPX3I0g.jpg)

Thus, the front right suspension is nearly completed. I need to refit the wheel hub and bearings, and temporarily fit the original brake disc and caliper (future upgrades when $$ permit!). Then eventually fit the new shock absorber/coilover (when $$$ permit!). The rideheight is only a guess at this stage, so that will be assessed once the left side is completed and car is back onto the ground; I need to be prepared to reset the torsion bars if it's wrong.

Having spent hours/days slowly removing the front right suspension, that experience meant I could dismantle the left side quickly and with confidence. A brake pad wear sensor is incorporated into one of the pads on the left side; I previously decided to abandon this (as future pad upgrades will lack the sensor wires), and already removed the loom connection inside the engine bay.

Wheel arch liner and caster rod had been removed and put aside earlier.

(https://i.imgur.com/lrh2fum.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3FUGARo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dF7cWvC.jpg)

Behind the rear of the wheel arch liner, plenty of debris had collected.

(https://i.imgur.com/9ltecwE.jpg)

Splash guard and steering knuckle removed. The tie rod end (TRE) balljoint was difficult to separate from the knuckle; was easiest to unscrew the TRE from the tie rod and transfer to the hydraulic press to apply massive force. A little corrosion explained the union.

(https://i.imgur.com/QeQTI5X.jpg)

Measured the distance from an arbitrary (but similar to the other side) point above, to the end of the LCA marked with a punch, at full droop (torsion bar in place): 672mm. Whilst the reference point above may be slightly 'out' compared with the other side of the car, and allowing slight variances in chassis alignment during assembly, this difference of 4mm greater was no surprise. Before commencing the suspension, I measured from the ground to wheel arch, and did find the left side slightly higher. So when I reset the height on this side, I will make it 4mm 'lower'.

(https://i.imgur.com/zLXyOqK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Nlea2y6.jpg)

Lower balljoint removed with similar technique to other side: force via 3-prong puller, then wedging into the small gap between balljoint flange and LCA.

(https://i.imgur.com/4KHV96I.jpg)

Torsion bar extracted, then LCA rotated down to expose the bolt heads.

(https://i.imgur.com/93nxt1X.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/kq61N47.jpg)

LCA removed. Interestingly on this side, camber adjustment shims were fitted. They are only very thin - I'll measure accurately later but no more than 1mm - and sandwich between the chassis and spacer collars. Shimming the LCA 'out' increases camber angle; I can't imagine by very much, but I will refit them and await the wheel alignment results.

(https://i.imgur.com/apwoVl6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/zoqvJ8M.jpg)

Left side torsion bar removed, and UCA.

(https://i.imgur.com/y9PYzxK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/a5Lw3zu.jpg)

Now the front left wheel arch is bare, ready for the overhaul.

(https://i.imgur.com/ecRN4xK.jpg)

Lastly, some teaser pics. I had the CSC headers and front pipes ceramic coated by Modern Plating, Oakleigh.

(https://i.imgur.com/MXNbhaw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/o3ohXCv.jpg)

See you next month!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Beatle on May 08, 2013, 10:22:25 PM
Love ya work!   What are you using to spray the body deadener on the underside?   I recently blasted under my 90 with degreaser and the big Karcher and now have some red paint and some grey primer to cover......

BTW, don't be surprised if your front suspension heights are out when you settle her back on her wheels.  There's no guarantee the T bars will settle the same (wiithin your 4mm) and probably less chance that the relationships between suspension pickup points and the lip of the front guards are the same within 4mm side-to-side.  Then add that the car is not evenly weighted laterally and you may well need to rotate a T bar at a later date.

But, ya never know ya luck. :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on May 09, 2013, 09:20:02 AM
Thanks Paul. :)

What are you using to spray the body deadener on the underside?

I am using brush-on 3M Body Deadener (brush, then finishing with a cheap dispoble small paint roller for the texture). I've started with a 1L tin which has gone surprisingly far (adding a little thinners along the way), but have a 4L tin to move onto next. http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL97/467659/23841191/398747099.jpg

However, I do have spray-on 3M stuff as well. I just decided that brush-on was not as tedious as expected, and I don't have to contend with masking, overspray, face mask, and trying to spray when there isn't much space under the car.

I've bought both from Super Cheap Auto.

Quote
BTW, don't be surprised if your front suspension heights are out when you settle her back on her wheels.

Yep, I have a suspicion it won't be that easy!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Beatle on May 09, 2013, 05:42:15 PM
Cool.  I was wondering how you got the texture but kept your floors clean  ;D 

Foam roller?

Years ago I used to paint under the guards with tyre black before a club display.   Cheap, easy, fast drying.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on May 09, 2013, 08:36:00 PM
I use these from Bunnings: http://www.bunnings.com.au/products_product_uni-pro-75mm-sample-pot-paint-roller-kit_P1678256.aspx

Use and throw (disposable). I tried another cheap roller recently, but clumps of 'fibrous nap' worked loose which was annoying. So I'll now stick with what I know works for me.

Painting tyre black sounds like a neat trick!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on June 03, 2013, 04:17:16 PM
The weather's been pretty average the past month, and I've been under the weather myself on occasions, so not a lot of progress to show. And paint doesn't dry when metal parts are so cold, so I was using a heatgun to warm things up.  :P  I allowed each paint stage 'days' to dry, so whilst the steps look quick and easy, much of the time was waiting for the paint to fully dry!

First up, refurbishing the upper control arm (UCA). Grinder used to shave off the rivet heads securing the upper balljoint, then hydraulic press to punch them out.

(https://i.imgur.com/KLmmfQ6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/gKbmWaC.jpg)

Then removing the old bushing.

(https://i.imgur.com/J9427EF.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DvX6FYq.jpg)

Old paint and surface corrosion stripped from UCA. Then sprayed with Etch Primer, then Enamel Primer, then finally gloss black enamel.

(https://i.imgur.com/cvI21Rm.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/pwbwLG7.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ovNyzQH.jpg)

Removing the old bushes and support bar from the lower control arm (LCA). Then cleaned with rotating wire brush and prepared for respraying.

(https://i.imgur.com/1AE6jQG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KWYknkO.jpg)

Pieces sprayed with Etch Primer then Enamel Primer. Wheel hub was separated from brake disc and also primed.

(https://i.imgur.com/gEJk4s7.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0uwHfUx.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0NwHcn2.jpg)

Then pieces sprayed with gloss black enamel.

(https://i.imgur.com/0nGVPUj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/FzufIGQ.jpg)

Steering knuckle refurbished similarly: cleaned, sprayed with primer, then finished with gloss black.

(https://i.imgur.com/V4r50jg.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YsR3LOm.jpg)

That's it for the past month. I'm working on cleaning the wheel arch and underneath the chassis, ready for body deadener. Then I can begin reassembling the suspension on this side.

See you next month!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on June 05, 2013, 12:11:48 PM
Gday shiny_man

the paint anything special or just Black enamel ? ??? :) ??? ;)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on June 05, 2013, 08:24:59 PM
Hey alphie :)

It's nothing special. In fact, cheap White Knight spray paint from Bunnings. As with any painting, 'preparation' is key, so having a well cleaned and primed surface is important for the top coat to stick and last. Hence, using etch primer then general enamel primer initially. I haven't gone as far as finishing with clear coat, but meh, this should be fine for suspension parts.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Beatle on June 06, 2013, 06:27:54 PM
Gday shiny_man

the paint anything special or just Black enamel ? ??? :) ??? ;)

alphie, if you are in a 'hurry' automotive acrylic dries much faster than the regular enamel paints.  It's not as glossy as it's meant to be cut back but for rough cast undercarriage parts it works fine (of course, it's also available in flat and satin).  In fact I think it works better than enamel as you get thinner coats so it's less prone to chipping, but it is considerably more expensive
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on June 07, 2013, 06:50:29 PM
ta ;)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 01, 2013, 04:43:45 PM
Steady progress this month. Though I've been a little side tracked with a new upgrade which I should be able to reveal in full next month - teaser pics at the end though ;) .

Some of the work has been mundane - including scrubbing the grime from the wheel arch and underneath the chassis - but glad to have those jobs out of the way now!

Found a NOS (new old stock) coolant expansion tank on ebay, so bought it. From all reports, aftermarket ones tend not to be as strong, and can spring leaks under high pressure. Interestingly, the colour of the plastic is slightly yellow compared with the stark white aftermarket one; I'll keep the latter as spare, and still have the original dirty one somewhere too.

(https://i.imgur.com/LyyejKY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/S52Gyl4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Tif0zsU.jpg)

Left/passenger side torsion bar cleaned up. As described in the workshop manual, it is depicted by a 'yellow mark' and 'S' stamped into the rear end (the right side bar also has the red mark, but I am unsure what this represents).

(https://i.imgur.com/ziHsQ1c.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HwngjcY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PjDX4wF.jpg)

Wheel arch area cleaned. Any edges and sections with exposed raw metal were painted with zinc primer and left for a couple weeks to cure. Then finished with black body deadener, and satin black enamal in the suspension mounting pockets.

(https://i.imgur.com/EjyPGG4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ANWGAE9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/CbybLHb.jpg)

The area along the chassis rail was cleaned and painted with zinc primer. Later, painted with Alfa Rosso red.

(https://i.imgur.com/kUuNsNV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PhPwb3b.jpg)

Left chassis underside scrubbed clean, so too the chassis brace. Then painted with body deadener.

(https://i.imgur.com/X5AAO2O.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qiOvj59.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dmVZ4If.jpg)

New bushes for the LCA and support arm. When fitted to the support arms - nuts torqued to spec - the inner collars are firmly gripped. The outer sleeves are press fitted and gripped by the LCA. Even though the bushes are too tight to move by hand, the inner collars rotate within the sleeves once fully assembled.

(https://i.imgur.com/rN9Q9xW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/F5MforX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sKjjz5g.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/t8cuvpw.jpg)

Pressing a new balljoint into the LCA. This time, I first removed the protective rubber boot; this allowed me to use a smaller cylinder from the fitting-kit; I used the larger size on the other LCA, which was a fraction too large and didn't sit securely on the balljoint flange. No issues this time, and balljoint pressed as far as possible (leaving the small gap referred to previously). Rubber boot refitted after the job was done.

(https://i.imgur.com/G9wnmju.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ry5kYp2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/TehigMq.jpg)

LCA masked, then lockring and nut sprayed with primer then gloss black paint. Completed LCA ready for fitment.

(https://i.imgur.com/bPgGD9T.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/FFLFB3b.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NYNjqsZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/1GPqGNx.jpg)

Tie rod (steering arm) cleaned; chipped paint and surface corrosion removed with sandpaper and wire brush. Then masked, primed, and finished with gloss black paint.

(https://i.imgur.com/RWunwHj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VpbDjY5.jpg)

Leaving all resprayed pieces for a couple weeks to dry, then reassemble the suspension later this month.

Finally, a couple teaser pics of the front brake upgrade I am undertaking. Calipers are secondhand radial-mount 159/Brera Brembo 4-pot, and discs are new Tarox 2-piece 330x26mm. I am waiting on centre hats from Italy. Pads will be Ferodo DS2500.

(https://i.imgur.com/9TUBlB9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NPct2z3.jpg)

See you next month.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Al Campbell on July 02, 2013, 12:52:24 PM
Droool.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on August 09, 2013, 11:11:07 AM
Another month, and lots of photos! Performed a couple non-suspension tasks to begin with.

I bought a replica A.2.0363 tool, which is the cambelt detensioner locking pin. It holds the detensioner arm in the 'detensioned' (loose) position, required for tightening the detensioner against the new cambelt. Previously, I used an Allen key of the approximate diameter; however, note that the tool is 'stepped', with a narrower tip (to fit into a retaining hole) and thicker shaft (to hold the spring-loaded pulley arm). Basically, anything else can't do the job properly, and I was advised that a less-than-perfect job can risk having the belt too loose.

(https://i.imgur.com/BQVqOG1.jpg)

To re-adjust the detensioner, the cambelt cover and AC compressor belt were removed. Then loosened the detensioner nuts and slotted the tool in position; held the detensioner as tightly as possible against the belt, tightened the nuts, and removed the tool.

(https://i.imgur.com/lwzoAoA.jpg)

Then an alarm. Not so much to have an 'alarm', but to have remote central locking and remove boot release. The siren and bonnet-open switch are fitted in the engine bay. For security reasons, I won't show the full details of installation!

(https://i.imgur.com/3LxMg2f.jpg)

Back to the passenger side suspension. The LCA was bolted to the chassis with new M12x130mm 8.8 high tensile bolts + nuts. The original shims were fitted between the spacers and chassis. The torsion bar was also slotted through the rear crossmember, ready for refitment.

(https://i.imgur.com/1pKfzWb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/w77k9YL.jpg)

A hydraulic jack supported the end of the LCA at the required height. To match the rideheight of the driver side, the punch-mark on the LCA needed to be 595mm from the pre-determined point above.

(https://i.imgur.com/0tZISGd.jpg)

With trial-and-error, the torsion bar was refitted in the best orientation to achieve the desired height - ok, I was 1mm out again!

(https://i.imgur.com/R4ot8bo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yzGJuPs.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/6zNxkuv.jpg)

M8 rivnuts fitted to chassis, to fit the sump guard.

(https://i.imgur.com/uME65X7.jpg)

Prior to fitting the LCA, I added silicone hose around the PS fluid pipe for protection. I simply sliced along the full length of hose creating 'split tubing' to fit around the pipe. Also additional heatshield matting.

(https://i.imgur.com/mh3PmCw.jpg)

Now a photo after the LCA was fitted, with the M12 bolts/nuts. And a complete view under the front of the car; the central transmission tunnel is yet to be cleaned/painted.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZplnrC4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/wzWNxRM.jpg)

Superflex polyurethane bush fitted to the UCA, then secured to the chassis with a new bolt. New upper balljoint bolted in position.

(https://i.imgur.com/VIatv73.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/a5vOyiY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/fGp2KqX.jpg)

Caster rod parts cleaned, primed, then sprayed gloss black.

(https://i.imgur.com/sihYmox.jpg)

Caster rod assembled, and new balljoint bolted to chassis pocket. Far end bolted to the UCA and new split pin fitted through this bolt.

(https://i.imgur.com/XeVC89f.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xs8Y7lt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/MrQ7uSp.jpg)

New tie rod end/balljoint fitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/KXMNaN8.jpg)

I haven't fitted the passenger side steering knuckle/upright yet because of new brakes! I need a custom bracket made to fit the new calipers, and will take the knuckle and caliper to a workshop to make them for both sides of the car.

The new front brakes will admittedly be overkill for a street car, and arguably even for a track car. The factory brakes are a minor weak link on the V6 75, so I contemplated many upgrade options. In the end, I decided on 159/Brera Brembo calipers and 330mm diameter discs. I will also require a bigger-bore master cylinder. My GT and 159 both have 330mm discs and 4-pot Brembo's, so why not?!

The calipers are secondhand, from Italy. I have started refurbishing, and will respray red. These calipers are a monoblock (1-piece) design.

(https://i.imgur.com/GAtsQmt.jpg)

I started by polishing the pad retaining pins and spring clips. Half expected to purchase new parts, but the originals cleaned to as-new, which was a pleasant surprise. Also polished the visible 'hex' surfaces of the bleed screws.

(https://i.imgur.com/Q72QftV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/FFWhK13.jpg)

Much time was spent cleaning the calipers. Previously, not much care had been taken with this particular pair; plenty of 'dents' from hammering in/out the pad retaining pins. And the amount of corrosion on the inside surfaces where the discs flicked off grime was quite bad. You can tell which caliper has been cleaned! My Dremel tool with 'carbon steel brush' attachment was most useful to remove corrosion.

(https://i.imgur.com/cexQGzz.jpg)

The brake pad support surfaces were fairly pitted; would be interesting to know if this is due to the European climate (eg: salted roads in Northern Italy), because I doubt the calipers on our 159SW Ti are the same.

(https://i.imgur.com/91wfu3A.jpg)

Compared with the calipers on my GT (2-piece calipers, with 330x32mm discs), the pad support surfaces on the 159 calipers are part of the monoblock alloy. The GT calipers have separate bolt-on steel guides; if they wear, they can be replaced.

(https://i.imgur.com/8TXYVU9.jpg)

Another difference, GT calipers have two different size pistons: the upper pair are 38mm diameter, the lower pair 42mm. The 159 pistons are all 42mm diameter.

I used Quiksteel epoxy to fill the pitting on each support surface. Sanded smooth with 800 grade wet&dry sandpaper.

(https://i.imgur.com/QXqUIwq.jpg)

Top and lower pad support surfaces smoothed.

(https://i.imgur.com/agFdLPf.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/BdjUPwW.jpg)

Here are the disc brake 'discs'. They are part of a 2-piece (non-floating) disc, make by Tarox, Italy. This spec is machined from billet steel, and are 330x26mm (GT spec: 32mm wide; 159/Brera spec: 28mm wide), with 'F2000' curved grooves. Tarox offer a number of different groove patterns and/or drilling; I have the F2000 on my GT and I like the look.

When purchased, the vendor and I did not realise the part number - KMRD0038 - was for the discs only, so I had to order the centre hats separately after taking the first delivery. Hence, my initial photos are of the discs only. They are inscribed with '23-13' which I determined to be the week of manufacture (23rd week of 2013), so they were freshly made for my order. This model disc is part of their catalogue, designed specifically for the Alfa 75. An option is a complete Tarox kit, including 6-pot Tarox calipers + mounting bracket, but I prefered genuine Alfa/Brembo calipers.

I bought these from Ricambi Tuning, Italy (http://www.ricambituning.it/en/index.asp), and their service remains excellent (my third large purchase in as many years). Emails answered promptly, and Alessio's English is excellent. Shipping time (once despatched) within 5 days via SDA couriers.

(https://i.imgur.com/M5Q8eBq.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HThVW52.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qZl6E5b.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qs6BiKP.jpg)

Images of disc, disc + Ferodo DS2500 pad, disc (+pad) + caliper.

(https://i.imgur.com/cVDpwdo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nCBdz6y.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9TUBlB9.jpg)

A fortnight later, the Tarox centre hats arrived. Made from billet aluminium (presumably T6-7075), anodized. Manufacture date '47-12', so off-the shelf. Bolts + lock nuts came with both the disc and hats, so a spare set! The hats emulate the original discs for perfect fit; this includes bolt holes to secure the hubs, bevelled edge around the centre hole to accommodate the hub radius edge, and lip for the wheel stud heads.

(https://i.imgur.com/8t3MBHC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/D373mip.jpg)

Wheel studs were re-used (not include with centre hats). They are a 'clipped head' design (the flat edge can abut the lip to prevent rotation), and the shanks are 'round' (as opposed to splined). Using the press, the studs were removed without difficulty.

(https://i.imgur.com/2gzakFn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/cQnOB3v.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NqQUf0q.jpg)

After a clean, the stud heads were primed then sprayed satin black.

(https://i.imgur.com/bAqaXg4.jpg)

I lightly greased the shanks then pressed the studs into the new hats.

(https://i.imgur.com/TxrLoGh.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/bQPb8xY.jpg)

More test fitting! The 2-piece discs temporarily bolted together, and to the hub.

(https://i.imgur.com/nEV9eGg.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7RJ0sr7.jpg)

Confirmed the discs fit inside the 15" wheels, without calipers of course. At least I know I can roll the car around with the discs fitted and without the calipers.

(https://i.imgur.com/KBqimkE.jpg)

Now a test with the wheels destined for the car: 18x8" ET35 OZ Racing Superleggera.

(https://i.imgur.com/Ds5SLCq.jpg)

In comparison, the disc almost looks lost inside the bigger wheel.

(https://i.imgur.com/TeaI9eV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LPl9tQm.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xgHdlNg.jpg)

Importantly, my concerns about the spokes clearing the new calipers were allayed. There is a large amount of clearance, easily a finger breadth!

(https://i.imgur.com/sjd7t6n.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Xs4yZf8.jpg)

Disassembled again. I was mindful of surface rust affecting the exposed non-contact disc surfaces; have seen (and have) cars with this imperfection. So, masked the discs, and sprayed the inner ring and outer edge with clear caliper paint.

(https://i.imgur.com/62n3cfR.jpg)

And check this out! I brought the cold steel discs into the house to oven bake @ 90 degrees celcius and cure the paint (as per instructions). The relatively humid environment meant water condensed on the top of the disc, resulting in surface rust! The inner ring and outer edge were spared; I thought that was a pretty impressive demonstration.  :D

(https://i.imgur.com/7NwX1vN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JGCrr5H.jpg)

Tarox M6 high tensile 8.8 bolts and lock nuts. The nuts are 'compressed', deformed to a slight oval, to achieve the locking function. I did have Loctite 'Blue' 243 (recommended by Brembo for their discs) but decided against using it.

(https://i.imgur.com/1f961ql.jpg)

Centre hats bolted to the discs. All torqued to 90 lb.in in a cross pattern order.

(https://i.imgur.com/3lzKkRD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/TABejqy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/B28dKj0.jpg)

There you have it. The new discs look superb, and of equal build quality. The photo of the disc and caliper behind the OZ wheel is one of my favourites, so I'm very excited about how it will turn out eventually.

As you expect, there's pros and cons to such an upgrade; the braking performance should be much, much improved (larger pad surface area, braking force from bigger radius, better disc cooling properties). But the weight goes up...and a lot.

I roughly weighed everything for comparison.
*OE disc (incl studs): 6.0kg each
*OE caliper (incl existing pads + retaining pins/spring clip): 2.8kg each

*Tarox disc (disc + centre hat + bolts + studs): 8.4kg each
*159 Brembo caliper (incl retaining pins/spring clip) + Ferodo pads: 4.0kg

Hence, they contribute an extra 3.6kg of unsprung weight. 18" wheels/tyres will add more. Some people will not approve!  :P

By next month I should have the driver side disc and hub fitted, and one caliper resprayed. Then I'll take the other steering knuckle/disc and caliper to have mounting brackets made. See you then!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on August 10, 2013, 10:37:14 AM
geez mate are you just teasing us,
Mind you i hope you have racing harness to make sure you dont go through the windscreen lol.
(just letting you know that Autobarn has "saas 4-point 2"harness " for $99.00 to the 18 aug, just an idea lol)

cheers guys hope you have a great day.
 
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Al Campbell on August 20, 2013, 12:54:50 PM
And as an aside  your photos are top quality too :). 
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Craig_m67 on August 20, 2013, 05:07:45 PM
Would love to see the calliper brackets when ready... If they bolt onto 2.0L 105 uprights (given we can use 75 callipers?) you may get more orders.

As an aside, will they need to be 'engineered' in Aust. for road use?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on August 21, 2013, 09:14:55 AM
Thanks guys!

I'll be sure to post photos of the brackets once they're fabricated. May be a couple months yet.

The car will need 'engineering' once it's completed. Brakes, suspension, and boot-mounted battery will need inspecting. Maybe other stuff.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on August 21, 2013, 01:36:26 PM
might be a bit of a long shot... reckon you could make a tech drawing of the front hub? the part that the studs pass through? need bearing measurements mic'd though.

i don't know if you've seen my custom made rear hubs... multi stud 114.3 and 98 pcd's... i need to make some fronts too now, to go along with a brake upgrade...
(http://sphotos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/527469_10151041053037109_1495710592_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Beatle on August 21, 2013, 07:48:10 PM
Thanks guys!

I'll be sure to post photos of the brackets once they're fabricated. May be a couple months yet.

The car will need 'engineering' once it's completed. Brakes, suspension, and boot-mounted battery will need inspecting. Maybe other stuff.

:)

Engineering?  Maybe for the brakes, but I've never heard of anyone needing an engineering cert for moving the battery????    And what have you done to the supension that makes you think it requires inspection?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on August 21, 2013, 08:27:38 PM
might be a bit of a long shot... reckon you could make a tech drawing of the front hub?

Hmm, I don't think I could reliably micrometer everything. The front hub is relatively complex, with different sized inner and outer bearings, plus a rear seal, and front recess for the hub cover/cap.

Engineering?  Maybe for the brakes, but I've never heard of anyone needing an engineering cert for moving the battery????    And what have you done to the supension that makes you think it requires inspection?

I don't have good experience with what would be required. So I'm unsure if relocating the battery to the boot is an issue or not. If a certificate isn't required for that, no probs.

I will eventually fit the RS Racing suspension kit, which includes front coilovers (which are fitted in addition to the torsion bars). If engineering isn't required, again, I have no probs with that!  ;D My preferred ride height would likely be too low mind you; I have a suspicion it won't have a full 100mm clearance throughout, particularly with the sump guard fitted. Might be ok without it, we shall see.

Hmm, if being pedantic, how about wheel diameter and width, and steering wheel size...list could go on.  ::)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ANG156 on August 26, 2013, 04:08:41 AM
Dont worry about engineering certificates if your car is still registered as your progress with your mods. Might be an issue if you need to get it back on the road but then I knew someone who registered a falcon 500 with all sorts of mods and the guy at vicroads just signed off on it. The more you tell them the worse it will be...take a drive down to vicroads broadmeadows and a chick in a mini skirt with heels who doesnt know the difference between a nut or bolt will only look for the engine number and thats it.

Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on August 26, 2013, 09:56:49 AM
 ;D I like that advice! I made a point of having roadworthy and registration when I first bought the car, knowing it could be a major headache obtaining registration after I had finished! So yes, the car is registered, paid annually, on time.  :)

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Beatle on August 29, 2013, 09:14:45 PM
There are lots of mods you can do yourself, all quite legally.  But for heavily modified brakes I'd go for an Eng Cert.   If you bump someone in a carpark and the insurance assessor sees the nice big new brakes, it might make things awkward.

If you knock a cyclist off his bike and kill him and the police/insurer/coroner sees the sees the nice big new brakes, it might make things expensive, forever............... ;)

And another thing to consider; if you are intending to mod to the extent that it will require engineering, talk to your engineer before you turn a spanner.   Much better to do it knowing what the engineer requires and what the engineer will approve.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 12, 2013, 09:10:06 PM
Update time. :)

The weather was pretty average every day I was working on the car, so I didn't have an opportunity to start painting the brake calipers. But, Spring is upon us, and the weather has been better, so hopefully the coming weeks will be ideal.

Here, I removed the right brake disc splash guard, and confirmed it needed some trimming from the 'corners' for better clearance of the new calipers.

(https://i.imgur.com/aSSqr5P.jpg)

Trimmed each corner, then re-primed and sprayed with high-temperature tolerant black paint. Refitted the right side guard once dry.

(https://i.imgur.com/omX0zuJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xNBx8wy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/1E1A65b.jpg)

Bought some (brake) hose clamps and removed the original front brake calipers. The hoses will be replaced with braided versions, so no concerns about kinking and damaging the old ones.

(https://i.imgur.com/tl3pb17.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/uas1rTU.jpg)

Right side hub and bearings. There was evidence of grease working its way past the original seal, so new one required. Also, I couldn't avoid damaging the old seal during removal to access the bearing. Later discovered I was supplied the wrong size, outer diameter! Instead of 57mm, they were 56mm, so had to re-order and wait for delivery.

Everything degreased and inspected. The bearings and races appeared in good condition, and possibly not the originals.

(https://i.imgur.com/dZbWc2k.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JJARLW0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/uUip9tt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/K7JWKcK.jpg)

'Up to' 50g of bearing-grease required, as per workshop manual. This equates to quite a lot; the hub was moderately packed. I've continued to use Penrite lubricants.

(https://i.imgur.com/M3Mbnbf.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/AY6AbwV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xQCZFMp.jpg)

The correct size seals sourced and fitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/NvJgXre.jpg)

Hub and disc brake fitted together, more grease applied to axle, then slid into position.

(https://i.imgur.com/lhqGKiz.jpg)

Castle nut and washer fitted, then torqued according to workshop manual. Low torque required, so the small 1/4" drive wrench used. Once properly set, new split pin fitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/QC6wGR3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YfP8r37.jpg)

Hub cover refitted and job done on this side: new Tarox disc in position.

(https://i.imgur.com/g80p4cG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PGcS5s0.jpg)

Similar steps followed for the left side, but steering knuckle not fitted to the car so that I can take this assembled unit to have the caliper brackets custom made.

Trimmed and painted splash guard bolted to steering knuckle.

(https://i.imgur.com/lNRE7Kn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xbsjdCs.jpg)

Packed no more than 50g of fresh bearing grease into the hub.

(https://i.imgur.com/H8u8l3S.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xXbnWDx.jpg)

Dropped the inner bearing back into position, then fitted the new seal. The 41mm socket piece (same size used to turn the crankshaft pulley nut) was the ideal diameter to hammer the seal into position.

(https://i.imgur.com/n23jj4y.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Sn80UFH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nND97qu.jpg)

Hub secured to brake disc.

(https://i.imgur.com/N9LwVrf.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/iX0jKwR.jpg)

Then hub/disc slid onto steering knuckle axle, castle nut torqued to-spec and split pin fitted, finished with hub cover.

(https://i.imgur.com/n0qrQ13.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/hD0PbZy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZIwFI9e.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VCk5g5z.jpg)

Onto a new stage: cleaning up the front right quarter panel. I will have this whole panel resprayed; there are areas where the clear-coat is peeling. Plus, after much deliberation I made the decision to change to the Evoluzione style bodykit! So the wheel arch mouldings and sideskirts will be replaced as part of the transformation.

Removing the wheel arch moulding, which was fitted with 4 rivets. The rivet heads were 'drilled out'.

(https://i.imgur.com/dLwcOMo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qMIuYt6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/CypglbR.jpg)

Note the mounting tabs for the wheel arches. The arches are made from an ABS plastic, hollow and light.

(https://i.imgur.com/Fik617O.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/oJhGDIz.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/96dab57.jpg)

A heat gun and plastic 'trim removal tools' were used to remove the grey side moulding. A few areas had a solid, plasticky bonding agent (?Sikaflex) which required a hobby knife to cut through.

(https://i.imgur.com/Spbp1Jb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ucOHZ7v.jpg)

The front of the mouldings are held to the panel via an interference-fit round lug. Double-sided tape does most of the job of fixing the mouldings in position. A lot of tape residue remained.

(https://i.imgur.com/PK5FlQD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3LIKLcn.jpg)

The double-sided tape remained solidly bonded to the back of the moulding.

(https://i.imgur.com/5RD3mLf.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/wpSTrfr.jpg)

Trying to remove the tape residue initially proved a major chore. I tried every solvent I had, with little effect: turpentine, wax & grease remover, paint thinners, kerosene, but it seemed methylated spirits worked best. Regardless, it remained a very tedious job, still requiring a knife blade and finger nails.

I knew there must be an easier way, so did some research. A dedicated solvent like 3M Tape & Residue Remover was recommend by some, but then I discovered pin stripe eraser wheels. Wow, awesome tool, and very cheap. These attach to any drill, and cost me about A$8 each. They seem made from a firm rubber, and function similarly to a pencil eraser.

Attached to my electric drill, running at 2,800 rpm. After a little practice, these made very easy work of removing the residue. Some of the best little 'tools' I've ever bought; cheap and extremely effective. A revolution!  :mrgreen:

(https://i.imgur.com/vPlLcbO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/A7urZDL.jpg)

For comparison, you can see where I needed to use the knife to cut off the black (Sikaflex) bonding agent. Then where I started removing the tape residue using a solvent, fingernails and knife. Then the flawless finish from using the eraser wheels. Also note the peeling clear coat; this panel may have been resprayed at some stage.

(https://i.imgur.com/AXSOOGs.jpg)

In this photo, you may be able to notice the subtle difference in paint colour. Behind the mouldings is 'fresher' paint, a slightly lighter shade of red. The remainder of the paintwork is 'faded', and is a darker shade. It's another reason to respray most of the car, to attain matching panels, albeit at extra cost.

(https://i.imgur.com/k6tj9hC.jpg)

I'll leave it here for this month. Thanks for looking.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on September 15, 2013, 03:15:15 PM
Some more awesome work, Shiny!!!  8)
I'm sure that everyone appreciates your efforts, you information and your photos.

It will be interesting to see what your car looks like with the 18" wheels on it. I like the O.Z.s, but personally think that 18s on a 75 will look strange. But potential looks are always a hard thing to judge and are definitely based on personal preference.

Keep up the great work!   :D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 16, 2013, 07:32:02 PM
Cheers Duk, appreciate it.  :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: AR753.0ltr on September 17, 2013, 12:38:52 PM
Hey Shiny,

Great attention to detail. Love the build and the brake upgrade. Look like it's all coming together. Hopefully one day I can get my 75 to that standard.

Was going to suggest, the hub grease cap that covers the front wheel bearing you can buy those new from Italian automotive spares.
Had to get a couple when i did my wheel bearings as they were a bit dented. Just thought I'd suggest it as it would keep with your level of detail on the car.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: bteoh on September 17, 2013, 06:43:05 PM
Hi Shiny,

Did you replace the front bearings? I was wondering how you removed the outer race? I had to take my hub to the alfa specialist to remove it for me :)

Nice work and very meticulous. Well done
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on September 17, 2013, 07:12:41 PM
I was wondering how you removed the outer race? I had to take my hub to the alfa specialist to remove it for me :)

The easiest way to get a race out of a hub is to run a bead of weld around it (on the actual area the rollers run on), either MIG or Arc.
This causes the race to shrink and also gives you a handy place to put a dolly against to administer the final bit of effort to get the race out.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 17, 2013, 07:40:12 PM
Was going to suggest, the hub grease cap that covers the front wheel bearing you can buy those new from Italian automotive spares.

Thanks for the heads-up. But sshhh, don't tell anyone if I retain the originals   :-X . Only cos they will be hidden from sight.  :P

Did you replace the front bearings? I was wondering how you removed the outer race? I had to take my hub to the alfa specialist to remove it for me :)

I didn't replace them. If required, I would have tried to work something out using my hydraulic press.

:)
Title: Rear side strip wraparound
Post by: VeeSix on September 19, 2013, 07:28:07 PM
Dam fine work Richard, can not wait to take it for a drive  ;D

I am slowly restoring a black 3.0, sort of slow project, attend to it here and there, the 75 signature strip that wraps around the car, the very rear one after the rear door bolts on one end but then has to adhered for the rest of the run, what are you going to use Richard, can anyone recommend a tried and tested product?

I have to replace and am wondering what the best product to use will be, you have to remember you need good adherance but do not want to damage paint, cause corrosion at a later date then have the rust start appearing from underneath  ???
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 19, 2013, 07:53:33 PM
Thanks mate. :)

For the mouldings, I'll use a combination of double sided tape and Sikaflex.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: VeeSix on September 19, 2013, 08:24:26 PM
What is Sikaflex and where is it purchased?

Why the two products and not just one?  :o
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on September 20, 2013, 03:18:58 PM
What is Sikaflex and where is it purchased?

Sikaflex is a non-acidic curing (as apposed to typical silastic type sealants), mounting adhesive that gets used plenty in the automotive world.
I've bought it from Super Cheap Auto in the past.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 20, 2013, 03:53:06 PM
What is Sikaflex and where is it purchased?

Why the two products and not just one?  :o

Yeah, Bunnings also sell it. I haven't compared prices, but probably not much in it, I just buy wherever is convenient.

'Sikaflex' is the brand. '227' is the version you can use. ie: Sikaflex 227. It's black.
http://www.supercheapauto.com.au/online-store/products/Sikaflex-227-Adhesive-310mL.aspx?pid=11079#Cross

You can tell from the moulding I recently removed, that it is primarily held by double-sided tape. However, this can of course perish a little over time, and can also 'tear' through the middle. As such, Sikaflex provides added security to prevent things falling off, but importantly, to keep the shape of any curved/flexed pieces (ie: keep the ends from popping off the panel).

I'm yet to determine if Sikaflex (or similar) was used from the factory. I suspect the front-right moulding I removed has previously been removed and then replaced. Chances are, the factory only used ds-tape, but I'll probably determine this once I remove other pieces.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 06, 2013, 02:32:37 PM
Update time again.

After much deliberation, I finally changed my mind about the exterior, and decided I will fit a version of the Evoluzione bodykit. This means replacement wheel arch flares, sideskirts, and bumpers. At this stage, I have secondhand tatty/damaged flares and sideskirts, made from fibreglass, which will require a lot of fettling to fit nicely. Fortunately, I'm pretty good at fibreglassing. Down the track, I will source the bumpers, and have to decide between the deeper front Evo style versus Veloce (or preferably a variation of these, the EMC Racing version, but these seem the scarcest); it will depend on the stance of the vehicle after setting the ride height. The Evo version will probably sit too low to be practical (let alone strictly compliant with roadworthy's 100mm clearance).

I drew inspiration from various internet photos to help decide what I liked. The Evo kit initially seemed too bold, but over time it has grown on me as the look that I like best. Here's some of my inspiration:

*original plan was TS bumpers + lip spoiler
(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5506/10108235516_8877f82548_z.jpg)

*Evoluzione style kit; note how the front bumper has the extra 'cooling slot' behind the number plate; this adds extra depth/height, and the lower lip may end up too low to the ground
(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2876/10108235756_cb74b744f9_z.jpg)

*favourite is EMC Racing front bumper; compared with the Evo, the central opening is a single large hole rather than divided into 6; remainder of kit is Evo-esque
(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5521/10108283863_2b9a43439c_z.jpg)

*Veloce style bumper; lacks the cooling slot of the Evo/EMC bumpers, so offers more ground clearance
(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3667/10108151384_1ee53b772f_z.jpg)

Everyone will have their personal favourite, so I can expect much discuss! And some people will prefer no change to the factory style, and fair enough. But my main inspiration is this black one, and no surprise that I bought the same wheels as a result!

(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5328/10108300114_7071c41870_z.jpg)

OK, back to my own car!  :D

First up, I fitted a new rear engine mount. Taking tips from others, I had it frozen in the freezer to shrink it ever-so-slightly for easier fitment. Then heated the housing with my heat gun (I don't have a blow torch). It pushed in quite easily, with a few hits from a hammer and punch; then used an adjustable spanner to rotate it to the correct orientation.

(https://i.imgur.com/q4kyFmE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/n2GwCVb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YFB3qQK.jpg)

The new mount isn't as wide as the housing, so I offset it to the right side, meaning the rear of the engine will be relatively offset to the left. Discussion in alfagtv6.com forums (http://alfagtv6.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4218) highlights how the V6 engine is usually rotated in the chassis, and looking from above, indeed my engine sits slightly 'anticlockwise' of centre. Arguably, this is partly due to the propeller shaft being offset to the right. Regardless, I am trying to mount my engine with minimal misalignment.

(https://i.imgur.com/2CyU1f6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0rUb1gx.jpg)

Onto the body, I removed the original sideskirt. This revealed years of dirt and grime in the door sills, along the side and underneath. The sideskirt was secured with a combination of screws, and twist-lock clips.

(https://i.imgur.com/hvxyhEh.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/MEaprKy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/r6ApVEx.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SsU1KEj.jpg)

The area was cleaned, including scrubbing the chassis, then painted underneath along the edge with body deadener.

(https://i.imgur.com/sZCPnCE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/TY4avCO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/v0ZsFwf.jpg)

New side indicators. 'Clear' provides a more modern appearance - or else, I just don't like orange! These versions are designed for circa-1990s Mercedes, and were suggested by NSW alfista XAR75X. eBay, AUS$34 delivered.

(https://i.imgur.com/YcRCkhS.jpg)

I had anticipated a drop-in swap, but no, needed to trim the panel. No big deal. Used the Dremel, and masking tape to help capture the metal filings.

(https://i.imgur.com/a5UA7qX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/CXqTL2Z.jpg)

Test fitment, and have since cleaned up the modified hole and painted with rust proofing primer.

(https://i.imgur.com/CXqTL2Z.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/k42k1fn.jpg)

Secondhand Evo style front wheel arch moulding and sideskirt. These originated from a car stripped by jazig.k. He sold the side pieces and bumpers to another owner, who only kept the bumpers and on-sold these to me. jazig.k originally dissuaded me from purchasing because of the damage, but hey, I'm up for a challenge and confident I can fix it better than new.

(https://i.imgur.com/FZWgqHb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YaktWuc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ImyhWXA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5J3tl6X.jpg)

Rubber edging on wheel arch moulding not in great condition. Decided to ditch this, and properly blend the piece into the metal panel. Some of the gel coat peeled off with the edging, and will be repaired accordingly.

(https://i.imgur.com/qhpLkVH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jOkF83R.jpg)

Test fitment, and you can see some of the work required.

(https://i.imgur.com/fHJ8zWv.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7PMPZZA.jpg)

Wheel arch moulding is a poor fit around the rear of the panel. Higher up seems to have been trimmed away previously; further down, it sits proud of the panel rather than flush; and down low, it needed stretching over the panel, unacceptably. So I cut this whole section off, to be replaced.

(https://i.imgur.com/YVQki4W.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sLYB1Ah.jpg)

Last installment: I spray painted one of the Brembo brake calipers, and very pleased with the result. The other one, along with the assembled brake disc and steering knuckle, have been dropped off at a local engineering workshop to design and fabricate a CNC routered adaptor bracket. By next month I should have the pieces to show.

Prior to painting, I 'popped' the pistons from the caliper with compressed air, by holding the blow gun  nozzle in the brake hose inlet. Some scrap mdf wood pieces helped control their release. The pistons have some surface corrosion/pitting, but primarily on the exposed surfaces, which won't affect function. Each piece cleaned for reuse.

(https://i.imgur.com/cD8vFwl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nkFyQ1J.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/w0ORfHu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Y0HkE7M.jpg)

Masked the caliper and commenced the spraying process, using 'Real Red' VHT Caliper Paint. My cheap way to support the caliper for spraying the flipside was using some M6 bolts through the pad pin holes.

(https://i.imgur.com/dSBJAIk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mdOaphK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xUywblh.jpg)

The paint was cured in the oven at about 90 degrees celcius for an hour, as per VHT instructions.

(https://i.imgur.com/3PuauHI.jpg)

Heat tolerant silver caliper decals, off eBay. Dimensions carefully measured, then applied masking tape for alignment after gently sanding the caliper surface smooth.

(https://i.imgur.com/O8viB4L.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/CptOm54.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OpXKrO5.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tgnHSYE.jpg)

Then many, many coats of Clear VHT Caliper Paint, cured in the oven.

(https://i.imgur.com/VQwDMqk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/WTju0Oy.jpg)

'Orange peel effect' undesirable. 800 then 1200 grade wet&dry sandpaper used to smooth the 'visible' surfaces of the caliper; ok, no secret, I saw no point smoothing the rear of the caliper if you aren't going to see it!

(https://i.imgur.com/KjAk37g.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/UoQNV6H.jpg)

Next, machine-polished the surfaces using an orbital polisher, 'White' Lake Country CCS polishing pad, and Menzerna PO106FF Final Finish polish (light cut, high gloss). Needed caution against cutting right through the paint. LSP (last step product) was Poorboys World Wheel Sealant paste.

(https://i.imgur.com/cSwkgjn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/n8sxSLJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/F84Komc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/j179ZwA.jpg)

Then to complete the refurbishment, refitting the caliper pistons. Masking tape removed, you can see the piston wells with black seals.

(https://i.imgur.com/Y0BJSP2.jpg)

ATE Bremszylinder Paste (Brake Master Cylinder grease) used to lubricate the seals and pistons. Dust seals simply stretch over the pistons then press onto the calipers.

(https://i.imgur.com/RCnWLiZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/MSvrEGz.jpg)

With the pistons and seals pressed back into the caliper, this caliper is complete and ready for fitment.

(https://i.imgur.com/qjeXV0L.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/XFzgJuC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yeX2Fkr.jpg)
Thanks for looking.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on October 06, 2013, 04:08:23 PM
I'm a huge fan of the Evoluzione body kit!  ;D ;D ;D
Nothing says '80s RACE CAR like no other (even if they were from the late '80s and early '90s ;) ).
BUT, I do believe that the real visual success of an Evoluzione kitted car, like the 75 in general, comes down to wheel choice, primarily offset but also design. And ride height, to make sure there is minimal gap between the top wheel arch and the top of the tyre. The reality of practicality and legality are often at odds with ride height, though.

Something to keep in mind with wide wheels and a reasonably aggressive wheel offset, is wheel arch clearance. Pretty obvious, but 1 thing I found with having the Pace Engineering 'long shank top ball joints' in my car, the camber curve characteristics (the wheels gain a fair bit of negative camber with bump travel) allow me to have rim width and offsets that you couldn't get away with in cars with standard suspension geometry.
Better handling characteristics, too.  8)

Pilfered from AlfaBB.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on October 07, 2013, 09:32:27 AM
Haha! That's my old EVO kit!! I sold it on ebay for $450 maybe 2 years ago... I can tell by the damage everywhere!

Edit: hehe, so I read the actual post though, you did mention it was mine...  I jumped the gun
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on October 07, 2013, 11:51:41 AM
Shiny should be repairing the old smashed up Evo kit, take molds from the parts and make a new 1 for himself and 1 to sell to me.  8)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 07, 2013, 12:56:04 PM
I'm a huge fan of the Evoluzione body kit!  ;D ;D ;D
Nothing says '80s RACE CAR like no other (even if they were from the late '80s and early '90s ;) ).
BUT, I do believe that the real visual success of an Evoluzione kitted car, like the 75 in general, comes down to wheel choice, primarily offset but also design. And ride height, to make sure there is minimal gap between the top wheel arch and the top of the tyre. The reality of practicality and legality are often at odds with ride height, though.

I hear ya Duk!  8) The Evo kit has grown on my over the past couple years, for sure. Agreed, the car will look most aggressive with a nice stance when low, and appropriate wheels. I love the look of the black car, so I'm wanting to emulate that, whilst being mindful of probably not having 100mm clearance. I don't know what will end up being the lowest part of the car; possibly the exhaust, maybe the bodykit; or definitely the sump guard if I have that in place. All these things will be checked and accounted for.

Quote
Pretty obvious, but 1 thing I found with having the Pace Engineering 'long shank top ball joints' in my car, the camber curve characteristics (the wheels gain a fair bit of negative camber with bump travel) allow me to have rim width and offsets that you couldn't get away with in cars with standard suspension geometry.

How much does it raise the end of the upper control arm, compared with normal? If anything, I think I'd fit drop spindles. I think both result in more neg camber, but by different approaches: 'pushing' the bottom of the spindle out (from the chassis) cf 'pulling' the top in (towards the chassis), if you get what I mean.

Haha! That's my old EVO kit!! I sold it on ebay for $450 maybe 2 years ago... I can tell by the damage everywhere!

Indeed mate! I recall PM'ing you about it, but you told me not to bother because of the damage. Hell, I paid more than $450 for just these parts, without the bumpers!  ::) :-\

Eh, doesn't matter. I can repair the damage, and will reinforce every piece to reduce flex (and cracking paint). It will take a fair bit of time to make everything fit the way I want, but should be worth the effort!

Shiny should be repairing the old smashed up Evo kit, take molds from the parts and make a new 1 for himself and 1 to sell to me.  8)

If I have the facilities to make moulds, I...err, still wouldn't.  :P ;D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on October 07, 2013, 01:19:21 PM
How much does it raise the end of the upper control arm, compared with normal?

Top ball joint is raised by about 35mm at a guess. I don't have any standard ball joints to compare to.

If anything, I think I'd fit drop spindles. I think both result in more neg camber, but by different approaches: 'pushing' the bottom of the spindle out (from the chassis) cf 'pulling' the top in (towards the chassis), if you get what I mean.

6 is 1, half a dozen the other. The same thing happens, the top control arm starts to arc inwards more than the LCA does.
The key is the distance in height between the centre lines of the top and bottom ball joints VS the distance in height between the top and bottom control arm pivot points.
Drop spindles are definitely the nicest way to go about it, but it's more expensive and there is also the issue of welded suspension components and road going legalities. I'm not saying that LSTBJ are necessarily legal, though.  :o


If I have the facilities to make moulds, I...err, still wouldn't.  :P ;D

Awwwwwwwwwww SH!T!!!!  :P
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on November 14, 2013, 02:13:43 PM
It's a busy time of year for me, so progress will slow down for a few months, but I intend on plugging away whenever possible. We are moving house again very soon, so the 75 will be transported to a new double garage shared with my GT. Everything needs to be packed, loaded, and relocated, and I need to refit the front left steering knuckle then front wheels, to be able to roll the car on/off a trailer.

But last month...

A little work was done on the front right EVO style wheel arch, creating a better fitment. After cutting away some of the damaged lower corner, MDF wood was hot glued in position to help create a frame to lay up new fibreglass. Needs a little fettling. Also cut away a section of the sideskirt which wasn't mating properly with the wheel arch and the car's panels.

(https://i.imgur.com/qq3pjCA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9msIlaF.jpg)

A view through the cut out in the sideskirt shows what a huge void will exist. I want to modify this to prevent accumulation of 10kg of water and dirt over the next 20 years! So I will drill some drain holes and block the opening along the inside edge with expander foam.

(https://i.imgur.com/tBS2qf6.jpg)

Next, is the beginnings of rebuilding the fibreglass wheel arch. Last month, I showed how I cut part of the inner edge away because of poor fitment. To recreate this section, I used the original 'plastic' 75 wheel arch as a mould, preparing it with masking tape for protection against resin. The chopped-strand fibreglass matting is relatively heavy thickness, 600g/m^2, so I won't need a lot of layers for good strength.

(https://i.imgur.com/fv43yxS.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/m2oNfs0.jpg)

Beginning with 2 layers, I first cut them to shape with scissors. Some trial and error, test fitting and trimming. Then prepared the polyester resin, and 'dabbed' it onto the matting generously, to soak through.

(https://i.imgur.com/Y8Xvz8x.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/1wIQDAL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7HrHiRQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2fMFXmM.jpg)

It cured overnight, but was the following fortnight before I worked on it again. With a Dremel cutting disc, I trimmed the excess by carefully following along the inner edge of the mould.

(https://i.imgur.com/At8bKii.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/c0tqfNq.jpg)

I 'split' it from the mould then removed residual masking tape, and trimmed the opposite edge.

(https://i.imgur.com/cCs8k8z.jpg)

Test fitment against the fibreglass wheel arch on the car. I marked where additional trimming was required.

(https://i.imgur.com/3PVGtwd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vHYyFq4.jpg)

This is the final result, ready to be grafted onto the existing piece, and of course any gaps will be filled to create a seamless join.

(https://i.imgur.com/Q9igbqd.jpg)

Probably of more interest, are the new front brake caliper brackets! These have been custom manufactured by a local engineering workshop from billet aluminium, using computer design and CNC lathes. They've done a very nice job, and we elected not to anodise them (I was assured they would not corrode any time soon but I cannot recall what sort of aluminium it is).

Everything was catered for; I provided only the hardware (caliper, pads, steering knuckle with hub/disc fitted):
* two tapped holes for the caliper M14 x 100mm x 2.0 thread pitch bolts, 130mm apart
* two untapped holes for the M12 bolts securing the brackets to the steering knuckles, 76mm apart
* radial distance to ensure pads line up with disc surface
* offset to centre the caliper over the disc (side-side)

Only because I've had a little trouble sourcing M12 x 40mm x 1.5 thread pitch bolts (now in the mail), I haven't been able to bolt-up the new brackets and calipers to show you. Next month!

(https://i.imgur.com/GwOiL0u.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VEujPwV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/M5S5a32.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZMXAiJp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SuuOE3P.jpg)

Test fitment with the left side caliper.

(https://i.imgur.com/kjMxA3m.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YPF6gcD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SNQrzcG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/XSSfPpY.jpg)

With that job completed, and hardware back with me, I've started respraying the left caliper. First, blowing out the pistons with compressed air.

(https://i.imgur.com/E8ZG1DB.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ABvsHM5.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KYbAKcf.jpg)

Similar surface corrosion on the pistons as the other caliper. Used a Dremel wire brush attachment to buff them clean, and wiped the seals. Parts otherwise in good condition.

(https://i.imgur.com/SC2q6kq.jpg)

Caliper masked for painting with VHT Caliper Paint, Real Red and Clear.

(https://i.imgur.com/EYMt4Dd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/z0b9vfp.jpg)

Multiple coats of red, then cured by baking in the oven for an hour at about 90 degrees celcius.

(https://i.imgur.com/TjEmL1S.jpg)

That's it for now. By next month, I should have the caliper completed, after applying a new 'Alfa Romeo' decal, clear coat, then sanding out the 'orange peel’ finish, and polishing. And when the M12 bolts arrive, I can test fit them to the car.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Craig_m67 on November 14, 2013, 08:45:36 PM
Is there any chance your 15" rim would fit over all that braking goodness??

And if (when) not, I wonder what changes would be needed.
Smaller disc... change to the brackets
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ANG156 on November 14, 2013, 10:50:27 PM
It will be rolling on 18s
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on November 15, 2013, 06:36:43 AM
Is there any chance your 15" rim would fit over all that braking goodness??

And if (when) not, I wonder what changes would be needed.
Smaller disc... change to the brackets

Indeed bigger wheels are required. This is essentially the same spec disc and caliper as the 159/Brera/Spider (Ti spec, V6, 2.4JTD) and GT/GTA (3.2; slightly different caliper), all of which run a minimum 17" wheel. Caliper offset might be slightly different, but if anything, there seems to be more clearance behind the wheel spokes on this car, which should cater to more wheels.

I don't think 16" would fit. But I suspect a 305mm setup would fit behind a 16". On overseas forums (eg: alfagtv6.com) there is much discussion about brake options, including suitable upgrades for 15" wheels if that's what you want.

:)

Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on November 15, 2013, 11:31:46 AM
Nice brackets!! Pitty about the tool chatter, but that's being fussy haha. Did you get to keep a drawing or program from the job? Or did they say they have kept it on file for anyone wanting to do the same?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on November 15, 2013, 11:35:53 AM
Nice brackets!! Pitty about the tool chatter, but that's being fussy haha. Did you get to keep a drawing or program from the job? Or did they say they have kept it on file for anyone wanting to do the same?

Ah,  'tool chatter', is that what it's called?! It adds character.  :P

Yes, they burnt a copy of the images/design for me. I don't have the software to utilise it of course (though I may be able to view it in other software?), but apparently it's in the most common file format for such work.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on November 15, 2013, 12:02:39 PM
Probably CAD files. Easy enough to get yourself a shifty copy of the program. Still a pretty penny to go that route for an upgrade [particularly the cost in the hats and rotors...].
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ANG156 on November 17, 2013, 01:10:43 AM
Shiny, why did u not go for the 156 side indicator? It is sleeker, modern and readily available in clear. IMO the one you have chosen looks a little odd. Its very square and bulky, that it is, it sticks out of the guard a lot even more so than the standard 75 one. The 156 one is recessed into the 156 guard but I am sure uou could have adapted it.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Bretton Woods on November 17, 2013, 02:55:03 AM

Yes, they burnt a copy of the images/design for me. I don't have the software to utilise it of course (though I may be able to view it in other software?), but apparently it's in the most common file format for such work.


This restoration is absolutely brilliant. The work you've done to the calipers is awesome.

Perhaps I can help you out with these CAD files. Can you determine what the extension is?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on November 17, 2013, 08:16:13 AM
Probably CAD files. Easy enough to get yourself a shifty copy of the program.

Perhaps I can help you out with these CAD files. Can you determine what the extension is?

It's meant to be a SAT file, yeah? I just tried to check with the disc in the desktop; hmm, seems a blank disc!  ??? Oh well, I will email him and ask for another copy.

Shiny, why did u not go for the 156 side indicator? It is sleeker, modern and readily available in clear. IMO the one you have chosen looks a little odd. Its very square and bulky, that it is, it sticks out of the guard a lot even more so than the standard 75 one. The 156 one is recessed into the 156 guard but I am sure uou could have adapted it.

Cheers for the suggestion. :)

I don't think the shape of the 156 indicator suits the 75. I want a rectangular one. The Merc one does stick out a bit, but next to the flared wheel arch, I don't consider it out of place. Honestly, haven't give it much time; they are back in the packaging. I think it needs to be taken into context of the whole, completed car, so that's going to be some time away.  ::)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Bretton Woods on November 17, 2013, 02:51:12 PM
I should be able to print some hard copies for you if they're .SAT. It's a Solidworks file and I should be able to get it open in NX.

Looking forward to seeing this car on the road. I'd really like one, but I don't have the time nor expertise to conduct a restoration like this.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Al Campbell on November 18, 2013, 08:04:20 AM
You're in Geelong Shiny? It'd be nice to see this car at a concours one day. Work (craft?) like this deserves to be shown.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on November 18, 2013, 11:37:17 AM
Cheers guys. Yes, I'm in the Geelong region.

Indeed, once it's completed, it will make an appearance at Spettacolo, for sure.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: VeeSix on November 20, 2013, 10:59:28 AM
Bet ya I know who your favourite royal is!  ;D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ANG156 on November 20, 2013, 09:37:35 PM
Quote
Honestly, haven't give it much time; they are back in the packaging. I think it needs to be taken into context of the whole, completed car, so that's going to be some time away.

You've made a good point there. I guess you will need to assess things once near completion. Will the car be resprayed?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on November 21, 2013, 08:23:57 PM
Bet ya I know who your favourite royal is!  ;D

Bahahaa!

Will the car be resprayed?

Mostly, yes. Probably everything except the roof and A-/C-pillars.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: VeeSix on November 22, 2013, 04:20:18 PM
A fantastic 75 kit, tempted myself, god dam the sill gap is decent!  ;)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Cool Jesus on November 22, 2013, 05:03:22 PM
Have been watch this thread with baited breath for each new installment Shiny. Love your work and even more so at how your doing it in your own backyard. Kudos mate, keep the updates coming.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on December 16, 2013, 04:19:49 PM
Cheers Cool Jesus.  :)

Merry Christmas everyone.

Overall, it's been a productive year on this project, but things have slowed down a little during this busy family period. Not a great deal to report, but some progress none the less.

Last month, we relocated house, including the car, parts, and tools. There is now a double garage, so the 75 shares space with the GT, which has come out of storage.  8)  And until the new house and garage are built, the 155 and 159 are still in the driveway!

(https://i.imgur.com/z0pBTMB.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tInNiSm.jpg)

To transport by trailer, the car of course needed to be in 'rolling' condition. So the front left suspension needed reassembly. At this time, I replaced the left tie rod because the inner joint was slightly worn. The right side is ok; the inner joint remains tight, such that the tie rod (steering arm) can be moved around without sagging down under gravity. On the left, the arm would simply drop down. No discernible  slop in the joint (compared with the very worn one on my 155), but certainly a sign there was wear.

The rubber steering rack boot was slid off after cutting the cable ties. Then a 22mm open spanner unscrewed the tie rod.

(https://i.imgur.com/dhQXUMA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/wgkhc1V.jpg)

New vs old tie rods. I already fitted the new outer tie rod end (ball joint) to the old one, so this, and the boot, were transferred across.

(https://i.imgur.com/3kWz3Zy.jpg)

New tie rod screwed to the steering rack, with boot and outer tie rod end. Notice how it can hold in place horizontally without dropping down under gravity. I need to fit new cable ties to secure each end of the boot, and spray the tie rod black to match the other side.

(https://i.imgur.com/TFmyahg.jpg)

Steering knuckle, with hub and disc brake, bolted to the suspension control arms and tie rod. The hydraulic jack used to support the assembly in position whilst fastening the castle nuts.

(https://i.imgur.com/QQRdKsz.jpg)

This is the current front ride height, after 'resetting' the torsion bars. Too low?! Possibly. The heavy rake of the vehicle, because of the standard rear height, exaggerates the front stance. Nearer completion, I will re-evaluate the final height, with a fair chance I will raise it a little.

(https://i.imgur.com/UkeJxBq.jpg)

Lastly, before the move, I completed the refurbishment of the left Brembo caliper, and test fitted the new adaptors.

Appyling a new decal, the surface and the decal were measured, and masking tape used to mark alignment. Decal then applied.

(https://i.imgur.com/aTDFf8g.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HFIYzCe.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2PbUDWJ.jpg)

Then, multiple coats of VHT Clear sprayed over the caliper, and baked in the oven to cure. Unfortunately, orange peel effect was the result of so any layers.

(https://i.imgur.com/EeDh347.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/G5THQh4.jpg)

The 'visible' side of the caliper was gently sanded smooth, with 800 then 1200 grade wet&dry sandpaper. Then machine polished, and finished with Pinnacle Cleansing Lotion and Poorboy's World Wheel Wax.

(https://i.imgur.com/TbcYRLH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tHwNYJC.jpg)

After polishing, most of the orange peel was removed, and a high gloss finish achieved.

(https://i.imgur.com/IXVKWFZ.jpg)

The 4 pistons and seals were then refitted, using ATE grease.

(https://i.imgur.com/qjWzXhk.jpg)

The competed caliper.

(https://i.imgur.com/z8QjPhN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ov8MK3o.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/pntGkML.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IXT6FMy.jpg)

Caliper adaptor bracket, with high tensile M12x40m and M14x100mm bolts.

(https://i.imgur.com/KQnh4AN.jpg)

Adaptor bolted to the right side steering knuckle.

(https://i.imgur.com/BI9kYNM.jpg)

Brembo caliper bolted into position for test fitment.

(https://i.imgur.com/HVhqwy9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/b59bqeG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qp3lYs3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NQWPTts.jpg)

And test fitment of the brake pads confirms a nicely positioned caliper over the brake disc.

(https://i.imgur.com/hClSbrc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3mVnUik.jpg)

The calipers have since been carefully boxed and placed aside for future permanent fitment. No front brakes for now!

Thanks for reading, and see you next year!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Nate Dog on December 16, 2013, 05:44:05 PM
merry xmas champ. amazing work on the 75. I marvel when i see the lengths you go to,
As to the car having no front brakes…
never mind, consider leaving them off, breaks are for pussies anyway ;)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Cool Jesus on December 16, 2013, 06:42:06 PM
Shiny, before you go. It's perfect timing that I'm also doing my 147 callipers. My question is, did you scuff the decal for clear paint adhesion? How many coats of clear did you go with?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on December 17, 2013, 09:33:29 PM
merry xmas champ. amazing work on the 75. I marvel when i see the lengths you go to,
As to the car having no front brakes…
never mind, consider leaving them off, breaks are for pussies anyway ;)

Cheers mate! Yeah, who needs brakes!  ???

Shiny, before you go. It's perfect timing that I'm also doing my 147 callipers. My question is, did you scuff the decal for clear paint adhesion? How many coats of clear did you go with?

I simply sprayed over the decal without sanding its surface. I only sanded the paint around it, in fear of damaging it. Seems to be no issues with paint adhesion.

I would have done maybe 8-10 coats of clear over the main surface (the side with the decal), and probably 5-6 for the other side.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: lombardi on December 18, 2013, 12:55:41 PM
Love your painstaking work, u are a perfectionist, am in love with the alfa car cover on the car opposite, u have the goods, congrats and i admire ur skill.regards
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Cool Jesus on December 18, 2013, 02:53:44 PM
Damn that's patience with all those coats. Worth the end result. Do you have a dedicated oven? Tried it in the hooded BBQ with a plate to seperate the flame from the calliper. Unfortunately one of the bits was over the fat drain on the plate and the paint just burnt off with the jetted heat coming up through the hole. Temp gauge isn't the best either as two other pieces were also browned by the heat, I was rushing the job too, may have been better to do it in two seperate bakes. So imletting it cure for 7 days before I clear coat.
One final q. Did you go with silver or white decals? I got the white and now I'm second guessing myself as I think silver would have been more OEM. Not sure whether to get silver instead, White would stand out a little more I guess.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on December 18, 2013, 08:11:16 PM
Love your painstaking work, u are a perfectionist, am in love with the alfa car cover on the car opposite, u have the goods, congrats and i admire ur skill.regards

Thanks lombardi. :)

Do you have a dedicated oven?

Did you go with silver or white decals?

I used a heat gun whilst painting  :P . It means I can apply coats a little faster; gently keep the caliper 'warm', not hot. A hair dryer would suffice.

After all the coats were completed, I use the house oven! It can stink a little after an hour (fumes), but nothing too bad.

My decals are silver. The original lettering on the 159 calipers is silver. Not sure about the GT/GTA calipers. I think white or silver are fine.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Craig_m67 on December 18, 2013, 08:30:46 PM
Are the decals heat resistant... So they don't go black under the clear coat?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on December 18, 2013, 08:52:40 PM
Yes, heat resistant.  8)

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Alfa-Romeo-Brake-Caliper-Decals-Stickers-156-157-GTV-Spyder-Mito-Giulietta-/350952953922

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Cool Jesus on December 18, 2013, 10:23:17 PM
Heat gun, hmmm... Got meself on of those. Are these your first callipers using this method? Curious to know if the multi coats using your method will stand up to normal calliper use once installed.

Craig, yeah plenty of users have installed these decals with positive results. So they must be up to the task.  As shiny will attest, surface prep is the key to any successful and long lasting paint or decal job.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Craig_m67 on December 19, 2013, 12:37:28 AM
Your preaching surface prep to the converted.
I've painted my bonnet four times and it's still not right (to me!)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on December 19, 2013, 03:10:21 AM
Are these your first callipers using this method? Curious to know if the multi coats using your method will stand up to normal calliper use once installed.

Yes, first time refurbing calipers like this. I have previously clear coated the rear calipers on my GT, but that was on-car, and not over bare metal; and have waxed those calipers before too, to help prevent fade and make it easy to wipe off brake dust.

I don't foresee any issues (like paint cracking off or peeling). Time will tell.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Cool Jesus on December 19, 2013, 07:36:25 AM
Ok, they look great. Looks like you're still a little ways off from putting th 75 on the road so the coats should of had plenty time to cure. Keep the photos coming mate.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Nate Dog on December 19, 2013, 09:15:59 AM
And just bought a set of decals

damn you for throwing up that link Shiny

damn you

Another job ill now have to do on the gtv i had no intention of doing. sigh.

i mean thanks for the link!
and merry christmas you bastard.

Damn predictive text...
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on December 19, 2013, 09:35:05 AM
Bahahaa!   ;D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on January 11, 2014, 03:50:16 PM
Hi again.

Despite being a busy month, I managed to spend some days on the car. One very frustrating hiccup was finding a front wheel nut jammed onto its stud. I recall finding the nut tighter to fit than the others, so I'm suspecting a faulty thread. On trying to remove, it simply bit into the wheel stud, and could not be removed beyond halfway, trying with my longest wrench, and the air impact wrench.  >:(

Forced to remove the wheel and steering knuckle assembly from the car.

(https://i.imgur.com/v4DUNnu.jpg)

From the rear, the damage caused by the rotating wheel stud was evident. Probably would have been ok with the original steel disc, but not the softer aluminium hat.

(https://i.imgur.com/jsTbYlV.jpg)

I cut the nut, I cut the wheel, and it nearly beat me! In the end, bought a blow torch to heat it up. Didn't quite finish how I intended, with the hardened steel stud twisting and breaking. *sigh*

(https://i.imgur.com/weovaBl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/FkbvAgb.jpg)

With the nut free, wheel was removed, then hub + disc brake removed, and broken stud removed. A couple of the gouges in the hat were from vicegrips during earlier attempts to prevent the head rotating.

(https://i.imgur.com/5RkLYnN.jpg)

JB Weld to the rescue. Filled the defects in the hat, then ground smooth with the Dremel after setting hard. Area was sprayed satin black. Whilst not perfect, it is fine for this area which will not be visible.

(https://i.imgur.com/ibThOBJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jrY0N2g.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/knAVgkp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/BYCEiLE.jpg)

A member here kindly supplied a couple replacement wheel studs (THANK YOU, you know who you are  8) ), one of which was pressed into the hat. I have a set of wobbly lock nuts to fit in the future too, so losing a standard one is no big deal.

(https://i.imgur.com/CJL9mGC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vxHS54k.jpg)

With the suspension dismantled, I sprayed the steering tie rod gloss black and secured the rubber steering rack boot with new cable ties.

(https://i.imgur.com/rW2cLkd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7rxelzG.jpg)

Finally, the steering knuckle and hub/disc were reassembled.

(https://i.imgur.com/SsIrYzw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LUVlF5F.jpg)

These are the front wheel arch liners. The left side had two large cracks; given the 'A75' written in white, I suspect this was a replacement liner anyway.

(https://i.imgur.com/x9SCQLB.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IJzWTPn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/np92VJM.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/a0PfEyA.jpg)

Gave both a good scrub.

(https://i.imgur.com/cGd5TyH.jpg)

To hold the cracked edges together, I used Dynamat Xtreme sound deadener. I use this product extensively in my car audio installations. It is an elastomeric butyl sheeting, with aluminium fronting; easy to cut, malleable, heat and moisture tolerant, and once stuck, stays stuck. Worked perfectly for this purpose.

(https://i.imgur.com/pzkTTRB.jpg)

New, generic trim clips to secure the liners.

(https://i.imgur.com/jxv44YG.jpg)

Right and left liners fitted, which concludes the front suspension work at this stage until I fund a new antiroll bar and coilover suspension.

(https://i.imgur.com/04dsXwb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/kYgT3Mn.jpg)

Last month I also cut a gasket for the join between exhaust manifolds and front pipes. Left side done, other side to do; tedious and messy job.

I bought a generic gasket sheet, 1.4mm thick, and began by drilling an 8mm hole for one of the bolts.

(https://i.imgur.com/DVTY8dG.jpg)

An oversize rectangle was cut with tin snips. To mark the positions of the other two bolt holes, I threaded bolts from behind, making them protrude a millimetre.

(https://i.imgur.com/JNvkLst.jpg)

After securing the piece via the first hole, a hammer gently 'tapped' over the other protruding bolts, creating position marks, then drilled accordingly.

(https://i.imgur.com/diJZPsZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/uzDGOhr.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/FLZTlj6.jpg)

I pondered how to cut the exhaust pipe holes. The initial attempt - cutting 'to the edge' radially with the Dremel - was too crude. Ditched that idea, and moved onto making a cardboard template.

(https://i.imgur.com/z441K6L.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jk2jTdx.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DUtlhSv.jpg)

With template and gasket together, the holes were marked. Then the Dremel was used to cut circumferentially. After fettling, the holes were cut nicely.

(https://i.imgur.com/oZhbOSv.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ky6wVPA.jpg)

With the gasket bolted to the manifold again, the reverse side was masked to outline the shape of the manifold flange. The final cuts were made around the edge to complete the piece.

(https://i.imgur.com/REbLZYd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/MLV2Upn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KREh8y4.jpg)

Another year done! I've made a start on removing the propeller shaft, which I will show next month. See you then!

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Nate Dog on January 11, 2014, 04:24:32 PM
Ahhh Shiny,
you never stop inspiring me to go work on the car.
Amazing, as always. Most impressed at the determination to press through the setbacks, hard enough going forwards as is on a classic, well done bud.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on January 11, 2014, 08:42:21 PM
G'day mate,
The car coming a long nicey ,Nice save on the wheel stud .Mite pay to locktight your wheel stub.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on January 12, 2014, 07:30:12 PM
Thanks guys.

Yeah, bit of thread lock wouldn't go astray.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on January 13, 2014, 11:26:45 AM
Gaskets from CSC area bit hit and miss I think I remember reading. Not sure what they made them from. There was a reason I didn't buy them anyway. Coper with sealant was successful with someone on the BB.
What I did - Draw file the surfaces flat with a rough file. Then I used a hard drying exhaust sealant. I did use soft sealant, 2 or 3 times, just seemed to start leaking after a month or 2. Hard sealant has worked for over 12mths without a leak.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on January 13, 2014, 09:21:22 PM
OK, might need some sealant too.

My CSC's did not come with gaskets. When I was inspecting them, the join didn't seem perfect, and I'd read about people having leaks. So, adding a gasket makes sense.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on January 14, 2014, 09:19:16 AM
Gaskets are optional from CSC, about $45 from memory?  Pretty stupid because they should be included IMO, particularly once you see just how warped the surfaces are if you draw file them...
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on January 14, 2014, 09:51:36 AM
Gaskets are optional from CSC, about $45 from memory?

Ah, now it makes sense. I didn't know they offered them.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: bteoh on January 14, 2014, 10:42:30 PM
Where can I get a set of gaskets? I bought my headers off Vin Sharp many years ago but I seem to have lost the gaskets whilst in storage.
I just tried EBspares and they say none are available and just put exhaust cement face to face. I think I prefer some form of gasket to seal them properly.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: john m on January 15, 2014, 09:52:06 PM
just put exhaust cement face to face.

Don't use exhaust cement, it will go brittle, crack and fall out. If the mating surfaces are "flat", use red RTV silicon sealant,  it wont burn or fall out. On clean surfaces smear one side and fit together, finger tighten bolts and pin them down the next day. This will give you a thicker film of sealant between surfaces.

Cheers
John
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on January 20, 2014, 10:08:49 AM
G'day mate ,
Have you thought about oil yet mate ,I know is not the first thing on your mind .
But I think you should have a look at this link:http://www.liqui-moly.com.au/?gclid=CNPD0Pmri7wCFVADvAodNw8ABA

I am going for the 10w-60 race tech GT1 oil .

Ok and now back to normal transmissions sorry about that .

cheers
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on January 22, 2014, 09:28:00 AM
Why are you choosing that oil? What's the ZDDP content?
I use pennzoil race oils for higher ZDDP
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on January 24, 2014, 07:15:54 AM
g'day jazig,
I have used the pennzoil  and found that liqui moly hold's better oil pressure in my v6.
it is a little quieter when running . :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on February 09, 2014, 10:19:38 PM
I posted an oil topic some time ago, so I might resurrect that for further discussion in the future.

This month's update is all about the central propeller shaft. It's a deceptively complex piece of engineering, yet elegant. For the power/torque of the standard engine, it's obviously fine; when people up the performance, weaknesses can arise, particularly in the rubber 'flex joints' ('donuts'). Not an issue for me in the short-medium term, so I am happy to use 'standard' replacement parts without modification.

Comparing schematics in the workshop manual versus ePer parts schematic versus the actual prop shaft, I discovered a number of differences. I attribute these to simplification and upgrades over time and possibly the Australian market.

Simplistically, the prop shaft is a 2-piece shaft connecting the engine to the rear gearbox, with rubber flex joints at each junction. Compared with 'solid' universal joints, rubber ones provide damping properties against vibration, noise, and harshness. In more detail, the flex joints transmit the rotational/twisting forces but through the central hole of each donut is an 'alignment bush', which interlock the prop shaft at each joint: front, centre, rear. The alignment bushes are spherical bearings that keep the shaft in line, working against the up/down, left/right forces. In the schematic below (taken from ePer), the alignment bushes are labelled 3 and 11 (same part number for centre and rear bushes). Pictures tell a thousand words, so more below.

(https://i.imgur.com/CRENAJE.jpg)

I was surprised to learn that flex joints are not confined to old school cars. They continue to be used in many modern vehicles (albeit more robust), including BMWs and Commodores. I notice some people modify their cars to accommodate the stronger BMW versions.

Much emphasis is made on keeping the prop shaft balanced because the shaft spins at engine speed. It seems unclear how much balancing was performed during manufacture at the factory; there are balancing plates spot-welded onto my shaft. Some people advocate marking every bolt, nut, and washer, to ensure they are refitted in the same locations; this is easy enough to perform, but I don't personally believe this is critical. More importantly, the front and rear prop shaft sections need to maintain the same rotational orientation. Required or not, I marked every part accordingly.

I noticed some vibration during acceleration when I bought the car, the cause unclear at the time. Outlined later, I anticipate this is due to a perished centre support, so hopefully a new one cures the issue.

Referring to the workshop manual and various forums I prepared myself for the task at hand. Though, I found very few photos of the procedure, so hopefully the following will be helpful to some people.

Firstly, tilted the car on stands to access the length of the prop shaft.

(https://i.imgur.com/XOLUSMj.jpg)

Access to the front flex joint was through a 'window' in the engine bell housing. Peering through the hole, you can make out the front flex joint (left, in photo). The 3 nuts fastening the flex joint to the flywheel bolts were removed. * Flywheel marked with position of each nut.

(https://i.imgur.com/MIM8nzc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KuVCms9.jpg)

Marking every part. Again, returning every bolt, nut, and washer to the same position seems unnecessary because there's unlikely to be significant weight differences. Yet, easy to do. Some people apply coloured paint, but because this is not permanent, and because I will clean and repaint, I used a hammer and 'punch' to mark pieces. Six bolts per flex joint, so each marked with 1 to 6 'holes'.

(https://i.imgur.com/zI033Fs.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Hc3UXho.jpg)

Next, unbolted the centre support from the chassis, just forward of the centre flex joint. The gearshift rod runs parallel from this area. Access required removal of the centre crossmember.

(https://i.imgur.com/Cz46eOo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ss3WneU.jpg)

Then, unbolted the rear flex joint from the transaxle. 3 nuts and bolts to contend with. * Prop shaft and transaxle forks marked for correct orientation when refitted, and nuts and bolts.

(https://i.imgur.com/J162eIE.jpg)

Removed the gearshift rod. A nut and bolt attached the front end to the bottom of the gearshift lever. The original protective rubber boot badly torn and will be replaced. The rear end slid onto a linkage, secured by a roll-pin that was punched out.

(https://i.imgur.com/hVUgjul.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZRh6Z8W.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YJoGJed.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/avVgPHj.jpg)

To uncouple the rear joint from the transaxle, and enable sliding the prop shaft rearwards and out, the front of the transaxle needed tipping downwards from the chassis. As such, changed the position of the stands to raise the rear of the car.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZalO6J8.jpg)

Removed 6 bolts fastening the transaxle crossmember to the chassis.

(https://i.imgur.com/nVO2zoC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2XxSz0B.jpg)

A hydraulic jack lifted the De Dion tube, pivoting and tilting the crossmember down.

(https://i.imgur.com/f5c6a6W.jpg)

There's numerous 'attachments' to the transaxle: speedometer pulse generator, reverse light switch, clutch hydraulic line, brake hydraulic line, and handbrake cable. At this stage, only the speedo pulse generator wiring prevented the transaxle from tilting adequately, so this required removal. No external plug, so it was quickest to remove the device from the side of the transaxle. However, this opened directly into the gearbox, so oil was drained accordingly.

(https://i.imgur.com/9lOnUtQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7LtNAwh.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/66nOZcP.jpg)

With transaxle tilted sufficiently, the prop shaft was disconnected at the rear joint.

(https://i.imgur.com/hQinyeS.jpg)

Transaxle tilted back to original position for clearance to move the prop shaft rearwards. At the front, the engine bell housing required tilting downwards to allow the front flex joint to pass out. The hydraulic jack lifted the front of the engine, pivoting the rear down. With the rear of the car raised, the front was too low to slide the jack underneath, so repositioned the car again with stands under the left side.

(https://i.imgur.com/OgQZ9zM.jpg)

After some jiggling, finally able to pull the prop shaft out. Hurrah!

(https://i.imgur.com/rtaiYvt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/H1eboHo.jpg)

Next stage was disassembling the prop shaft.

This is the front alignment bush, attached to the tip of the prop shaft. The 'barrel' slots into a hole in the flywheel.

(https://i.imgur.com/NzA95ZZ.jpg)

Not all 75s feature this pinch bolt and adjustable front fork, though I suspect all 3.0L V6 do. During reinstallation, it allows some fore-aft adjustment.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZxTyeS0.jpg)

Unbolted the front flex joint. The amount of tension evident when the donut recoiled. This one was in good condition, with only minor superficial cracks in the rubber, though it was no longer perfectly 'round'. All flex joints will be replaced. * Nuts, bolts, washers were marked for correct locations.

(https://i.imgur.com/LiiU3ee.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OdKrTwQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/XBYpQIP.jpg)

Front alignment bush being removed. Inside was a coil spring to hold the barrel in position. There was a 'special tool' described in the workshop manual, but of course I improvised using a balljoint remover and small socket piece to lever the bush off the shaft. Very, very tightly fitted; heat from a blow torch proved useful.

(https://i.imgur.com/8C4DAS0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/fejrKx8.jpg)

The barrel rotates over a spherical bearing, which was press-fitted onto the prop shaft.

(https://i.imgur.com/wkv0RWv.jpg)

Adjustable fork loosened and slid off the splined prop shaft, then degreased.

(https://i.imgur.com/7pIhRZl.jpg)

I originally marked the splines to ensure the fork was refitted in the correct position. However, discovered a 'flat spot' on the shaft lines-up with an area on the fork; thus, they can only be fitted in one orientation anyway.

(https://i.imgur.com/jVgsiHq.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/l2lHYrA.jpg)

Onto the centre support and flex joint.

(https://i.imgur.com/xGd1YnM.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/hjquKCb.jpg)

I confirmed the centre support was badly perished.

(https://i.imgur.com/1nkIJbn.jpg)

Joint unbolted. Centre alignment bush at the rear of the front prop shaft slots into the hole in the rear prop shaft. * Prop shaft forks, nuts, bolts, and washers, were marked for correct orientation.

(https://i.imgur.com/8MJiqrp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vxOQh2x.jpg)

Struggled to remove the alignment bush. Again, used the balljoint remover, though it's opening was broader than ideal, limiting purchase on the back of the bush. Also, the outer ring is 'split' rather than solid; applied force favoured pushing the ring off the internal bearing rather than removing together. Next trick involved a hose clamp around the ring to keep it closed and in position.

(https://i.imgur.com/ArIpoRx.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rZCw2rH.jpg)

With persuasion of the blow torch, finally removed the bush.

(https://i.imgur.com/CB0397z.jpg)

Removed the fork, secured by 32mm double-nuts. As described in forums, a 'thin walled' 32mm socket piece required, to fit within the recess of the fork. The socket piece I bought fitted without issues, but people have needed to 'turn down' the outer edge on a lathe.

(https://i.imgur.com/LI5qZS4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/aOc8S23.jpg)

Air impact wrench made easy work of nut removal.

(https://i.imgur.com/wlOYSDN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/kjkIsth.jpg)

Fork slid off easily using a puller. Partway, * marked the fork and prop shaft with the hole punch to ensure correct orientation when refitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/3uyjNZY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3F6nfVl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/McnuZI1.jpg)

Easy method to remove the shaft from the centre support and bearing was with the hydraulic press. The front prop shaft was short enough to fit within the press.

(https://i.imgur.com/xuetnUx.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Jzw1ggM.jpg)

Centre support and cup (bearing guard) removed. Note how the bearing sat offset within the support due to the perished and distorted rubber. Normally, it should be centred.

(https://i.imgur.com/t02FwtE.jpg)

All parts to be reused were degreased and cleaned.

(https://i.imgur.com/r2wWJRo.jpg)

Centre flex joint unbolted from the rear prop shaft, then degreased/cleaned. The alignment bush slots into the hole within this end of the rear shaft. The flex joint was in excellent condition, but will still be replaced and kept spare. * Nuts, bolts, washers, were marked for correct locations.

(https://i.imgur.com/lqh2rGJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OgCHVeB.jpg)

Finally, the rear flex joint. This was unbolted from the rear prop shaft. Rear alignment bush slots into hole in the transaxle fork. * Nuts, bolts, washers, were marked for correct locations.

(https://i.imgur.com/5dAcSL2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/1LcSsZO.jpg)

Different technique used to remove this alignment bush. Firstly, the outer split ring was removed with the balljoint remover. Then, heated the spherical bearing with the blow torch, and punched the bearing off the shaft. Much easier than my effort with the centre bush!

(https://i.imgur.com/NURHzgx.jpg)

Cleaned and reassembled, the design of the alignment bush as a spherical bearing is evident.

(https://i.imgur.com/LNTQxv7.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/md1OrYW.jpg)

Lastly, I commenced refurbishing the main prop shaft pieces, which had paint chips and areas of corrosion.

(https://i.imgur.com/Dnwp8T1.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/TxAHQ9u.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/6iS9VD9.jpg)

A 120 grit sanding flap disc on the angle grinder made very quick and easy work of stripping the paint on the prop shafts. A finer grade would have sufficed. Notice the balancing weight plates on the shafts.
Brass wire brush on the drill worked on finer areas. Forks and cup cleaned with the wire brush.

(https://i.imgur.com/aMtXmnh.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/1u3QCGM.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7ufdpAH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ys4bVeZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YdI6M5L.jpg)

Sprayed with Etch Primer then Enamel Primer, waiting to fully dry before I respray black...next month.

(https://i.imgur.com/RkklciA.jpg)

That was lots of photos, but hard to describe the details of the prop shaft without them. Next month I will respray the shaft, make a list of replacement parts, and clean the tunnel under the chassis.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Nate Dog on February 10, 2014, 09:31:08 AM
Thoughts on having those shafts rebalanced before putting them back on?
Your sanding might have thrown it out. Probably talking shit, but as far as i know, those things need to be pretty precisely weighted, else you'll set up and amazing frequency wave of vibration throw engine one end and gearbox on the other.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on February 10, 2014, 11:01:46 AM
Hey Nate

I'm going to chance it, without having it checked, presuming it was 'balanced' before I touched it (again, there was vibration since I bought it, hopefully only due to the broken centre support).

I might be talking shit too, but I'm presuming a gram here, a gram there, isn't going to make a difference at all, for what will be a street car that isn't spending most of it's time at the top end of the rev range. Could be different if there's slight vibration at 6000 rpm and it's a track car.

So I'm taking a chance here, but somewhat calculated risk.

:)
Title: 1989 Alfa Romeo 75 3.0 V6
Post by: VeeSix on February 10, 2014, 02:29:36 PM
Nice work Richard, enjoy your thought processes re parts management, you remind me of me, i too would just chance it, you will know if its way out, just do not forget to run the engine and let it settle before the final nut tighten, there will always be some form of vibration, it just depends how noticeble it is, too low a idle can cause a bad vibration if donuts slightly worn  :o
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on February 10, 2014, 11:08:46 PM
Something worth mentioning, Greg Gordon has had a very high success rate with standard rubber couplings/donuts on his various supercharged Alfa V6's.
Our local track Alfetta demon MD, has broken clutch housings on his cars. Maybe as a result of insufficient damping from vibration due to only having 1 rubber coupling, or maybe other factors???

Either way, if you plan reasonable power upgrades and drive the car like a sane person (or 1 who has to pay for the damages), then the factory couplings should be fine for a road car. Thought that's not to say that things can't be improved upon.
The front mounts of the transaxle can be cross bolted  to help add vertical and horizontal support for the TA. The rear engine mount can have its top and bottom voids filled with silicon or Sikaflex to help give the engine more resistance to for and aft pitching. Both of these will probably result in a bit more noise transfer, but by reducing the amount of angular change the rubber couplings are subjected to, they should be able to do a better and longer lasting job of transferring torque.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Nate Dog on February 13, 2014, 10:13:08 AM
Hey Nate

I'm going to chance it, without having it checked, presuming it was 'balanced' before I touched it (again, there was vibration since I bought it, hopefully only due to the broken centre support).

I might be talking shit too, but I'm presuming a gram here, a gram there, isn't going to make a difference at all, for what will be a street car that isn't spending most of it's time at the top end of the rev range. Could be different if there's slight vibration at 6000 rpm and it's a track car.

So I'm taking a chance here, but somewhat calculated risk.

:)

Cool cool,
Best of luck, you definitely know what you're doing :)
As to my post, please accept my apologies, no idea how you understood me at all, must've been drunk when i posted that.
My grammar and spelling have never been so poor!

Yes, those drive shafts have been previously balanced, just by looking at your pics you can see where weights have been glued on to balance them previously.
As to thinking a few grams here and there wont't make much of a difference, well :) a few kilogram piece of metal spinning at 3000rpm letting go is a sight to see :)
I'm sure you'll be fine!!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: aggie57 on February 13, 2014, 02:36:44 PM
Shiny - your detailed descriptions, photo's and attention to detail are tremendous.  There is a world of experience on this forum and others with these cars but I don't recall anyone ever documenting their work like this before.  So well done and on behalf of all who follow, thank you!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GeeTV on February 14, 2014, 09:05:42 AM
^ Totally agree!  Excellent work on the car but more importantly [for us  ;)], superb documentation of your works!
It's so inspiring that you make a novice like me want to go out to the garage and,.... well,.... uummmm,...maybe try & change a spark plug?
If you don't mind me asking, you must be some kind of mechanical engineer - yes?  Please don't say accountant!
Title: Re: 1989 Alfa Romeo 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on February 14, 2014, 11:09:58 AM
Nice work Richard, enjoy your thought processes re parts management, you remind me of me, i too would just chance it, you will know if its way out, just do not forget to run the engine and let it settle before the final nut tighten

Cheers David. I think the prop shaft should turn out ok. I've read about leaving the pinch bolt slack until after a few revs to make things settled.

Something worth mentioning, Greg Gordon has had a very high success rate with standard rubber couplings/donuts on his various supercharged Alfa V6's.

That's encouraging.
I haven't decided about firming up the rear engine mount, or the rear TA mount. Probably not at this stage, mostly because I won't be driving the car much, so things should still last as long enough. I'll probably wait until I've gone through one set of rubbers, then try it for the next.

As to my post, please accept my apologies, no idea how you understood me at all, must've been drunk when i posted that.

Ha ha. No issues. In fact, didn't even notice!

Shiny - your detailed descriptions, photo's and attention to detail are tremendous.  There is a world of experience on this forum and others with these cars but I don't recall anyone ever documenting their work like this before.  So well done and on behalf of all who follow, thank you!
^ Totally agree!  Excellent work on the car but more importantly [for us  ;)], superb documentation of your works!
It's so inspiring that you make a novice like me want to go out to the garage and,.... well,.... uummmm,...maybe try & change a spark plug?
If you don't mind me asking, you must be some kind of mechanical engineer - yes?  Please don't say accountant!

Thanks guys. I enjoying documenting it, and everyone's encouragement helps. Particularly - as you say aggie57 - a lot of procedures haven't been documented as photos before. I've read plenty of tips and descriptions, but a picture can clarify things much better.

@ GeeTV: perhaps be even more encouraged that I'm in no way a trained mechanic or engineer, let alone a mechanical engineer! My background is totally unrelated, so it's purely putting my interest into action. OK, I grew up being a decent handyman around the place, learning from my dad to use basic tools. But this car is my first proper overhaul of a vehicle (I don't consider this a restoration as such, because the car is in decent condition). So, get to it!  :D

My skills just don't stretch as far as welding and structural bodywork. Nor at fully cracking open an engine to port heads and rebuild bottom ends. Maybe one day, when I can invest in more tools.  :P 'Bolt on' stuff I can deal with.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: aggie57 on February 14, 2014, 11:48:07 AM
Actually I think engines would be well within your capability, from what you've shown so far.  There are no shortcuts with them, you have to do it properly, and the devil is in the detail but its very satisfying the first time you turn the key and it fires :)

But that's for later.....
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ALF750 on February 15, 2014, 07:17:47 PM
hi shiny, great job you are doing.  I had a 75TS with anaemic aircon and I was wondering what yours is like?   What have others on this forum done to fix/improve/upgrade the old gas system in the 75's??
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on February 15, 2014, 09:25:04 PM
Hey ALFA750.

Unfortunately, I can't comment on mine yet. It wasn't working when I bought the car, and haven't had it running since. I found an incorrect relay fitted for the compressor clutch, so I'm hoping that is all that was wrong.

However, one upgrade I plan is to replace the original serpentine condenser for a more modern parallel flow version. This is meant to improve the efficiency of any old AC setup. The refrigerant choice also has an impact, so you could talk to a local specialist about what choice is available.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ALF750 on February 16, 2014, 08:22:37 AM
I hadn't heard about the condenser change.   Finding seals for the compressor was the problem.  thanks.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on March 10, 2014, 04:20:34 PM
Not a big update this month. Though cleaning under the car was time consuming, and seems there’s not a lot to show for it. :P

I resprayed the prop shaft halves gloss black. It will be some time before reassembly; I need to source parts (flex joints, etc) when funds permit.

(https://i.imgur.com/tzt7ocB.jpg)

Spent several hours under the car scrubbing the centre tunnel clean, and masking, in preparation for painting.

(https://i.imgur.com/5mNUJi2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/zYvDoti.jpg)

Also removed the left sideskirt, to facilitate painting the chassis to the very edge.

(https://i.imgur.com/vxxLCNe.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/hZnod3f.jpg)

Then painted with black 3M Body Deadener. A couple small patches, either side close to the red crossmember, are pieces of sheet metal that will be painted red. So next month, I will complete the red areas, and touch up any spots missed with body deadener, and remove the masking.

(https://i.imgur.com/jI0RWne.jpg)

Next: to remove the gearstick assembly, first the gear knob was removed. Simply pulls off.

(https://i.imgur.com/Syf7PNS.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rIXgPmb.jpg)

Gearstick assembly detached from underneath by unbolting from the chassis.

(https://i.imgur.com/z4oU51e.jpg)

After removing an internal circlip, the pieces were disassembled.

(https://i.imgur.com/2NCDMt0.jpg)

New parts to be fitted are a replacement rubber boot, a plastic spacer (though original seems in good condition), and metal bush. The latter usually wears and contributes towards a sloppy linkage; I believe these are NLA, but I found a new one on eBay.

(https://i.imgur.com/w6eFUZW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/eDfvKiY.jpg)

The gearstick was cleaned, and its plastic seat separated from the bearing. The seat has some wear and a crack, but still functions properly. I have not found a new replacement. The original metal bush is press-fitted into the end of the gearstick. O-rings fit either side, into recesses, and the spiral groove presumably retains grease. Though, I can't rotate the bush within the gearstick by hand, so it either isn't designed to rotate or the existing one is stuck.

(https://i.imgur.com/kohZtv3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7RDEZRk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3JJMpiP.jpg)

That's the brief update for this month. Thanks.

:)
Title: Crackle, crackle...........
Post by: VeeSix on March 11, 2014, 10:37:42 AM
Lord of the serpent, what happened to that wheel?   :o
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on March 11, 2014, 09:34:15 PM
Oh, just a minor tussle with a wheel nut.  :P >:( Refer to the 11 January update.  ;D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Cool Jesus on March 18, 2014, 02:23:43 PM
Hey Shiny, considering the transaxle propshaft setup is virtually unchanged throughout the varying models with this. How did you go with the rubber grommets and bushes at the various ends off the two shafts? I've had no luck as yet locating replacement items. Items are those circled red in photos. Mine were either missing entirely and all sealing grommets are worn if not torn.

PS. I think I read a short discussion on here about whthere or not the shaft bolts mattered if they went into the same spot. I can confirm that it does matter. To what degree ??? , but I have an '89 Alfa technical bulletin which states the driveshaft is factory balanced 'on the car'. Adjustments are performed via differing thickness nuts, even installing two nuts on the one bolt. As such they advise that all mounting hardware position must be marked and refitted exactly as factory assembled to preserve balance.  (underlining per bulletin)

As you could appreciate, many an owner or (non-alfa) tradie, wouldn't have followed or known of this and the inevitable occured. Evenso, I'm sure I've read elsewhere that the two shafts should be (and can be) balanced as a single unit, along with any hardware, at any reputable drive shaft shop... I wasn't overly concerned on hardware postion with the Alfetta as I'll be ballancing per later option.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Al Campbell on March 18, 2014, 03:16:05 PM
I'm pretty sure, well a little bit sure  ::) that Benincas do prop shaft balancing - although they are in Surrey Hills, Melb. Which isn't that far from Sleepy Hollow.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on March 19, 2014, 08:44:14 AM
Hey Shiny, considering the transaxle propshaft setup is virtually unchanged throughout the varying models with this. How did you go with the rubber grommets and bushes at the various ends off the two shafts? I've had no luck as yet locating replacement items. Items are those circled red in photos. Mine were either missing entirely and all sealing grommets are worn if not torn.

I noticed a new centre joint seal has come up on eBay from Italy. Not cheap, but if you need it...
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/TAMPONE-ALBERO-GOMMINO-TRASMISSIONE-ALFA-SZ-RZ-75-NUOVO-ORIGINALE-60521191-/321354804862

I've not seen a spare centre bush though. Mine is still pressed into the shaft, and don't plan to change it.

The rubber seals on my front and centre joints seem in good condition, so I will reuse them.

Quote
PS. I think I read a short discussion on here about whthere or not the shaft bolts mattered if they went into the same spot. I can confirm that it does matter. To what degree ??? , but I have an '89 Alfa technical bulletin which states the driveshaft is factory balanced 'on the car'. Adjustments are performed via differing thickness nuts, even installing two nuts on the one bolt. As such they advise that all mounting hardware position must be marked and refitted exactly as factory assembled to preserve balance.  (underlining per bulletin)

Good info, and interesting.

Whilst I speculated it probably wasn't necessary, I did actually mark every bolt, washer, and nut for every location, so I will be safe in this regard. It seemed a no-brainer at the time, easy enough to do. I just wasn't sure how critical it was.

Seems it must make a difference.

I did find a double-nut on one of the rear joint bolts. Factory balancing?! The nut wasn't the correct thread pitch for the bolt. Appeared an afterthought to me, but I can't see why it was there except for balancing purposes.

(https://i.imgur.com/hgYvkrr.jpg)

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Cool Jesus on March 19, 2014, 10:17:46 AM
Huh, missed that second nut through your thread. There you go. If the thread is wrong, it wouldn't surprise me if a previous owner threw it on to resolve a possible vibration from the shaft. I've always wondered what and how one would balance the shaft on the car? Perhaps the town fluzy was placed in the car until her smile went away :(
Thanks for the link. Part no doesn't mesh, but it would be the same rubber grommet I need for the Alfetta. Pricing is steep, the pitfalls of restoring an old Alfa I guess. I'll have to think about it a little more and see if I can find a local substitute while they're still available.
Thinking about the bushings just reminded me that I have access to a friend with a mill, so should be able to make some new bushings there.
Your certainly doing a Stirling job on the build shiny. You had some posters also talking about the paint throwing the prop shaft out. I didn't chime in at the time as I didn't see you doing anything questionable. As you said, you had unwittingly marked all the hardware as required  ::) Yeah I've seen talk elsewhere about paint and balance, generally aslong as it's an even layer (ie sprayed or powder coated, not brushed) if there is any unbalance it will be inconsequential.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on March 19, 2014, 12:59:47 PM
Both my 3Lt and Twinspark have the same nuts and bolts right through the tailshaft yet both alfetta GTV's, '78 and '82, have had different nut sizes.

Maybe alfa ditched that dodgy idea later on...
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 08, 2014, 09:21:47 PM
This month's update completes the work performed under the chassis centre tunnel.

Firstly, I (brush) painted the remaining patches of the chassis with Alfa Rosso 130 Red,for a neat and tidy appearance. Masking tape removed, and the exterior of the rear brake and clutch hydraulic pipes were cleaned.

(https://i.imgur.com/XFNAv9X.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rkxhwaz.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7ML2n7q.jpg)

Back to the gearstick lever, I pressed out the bush. After a clean, indeed the bush is designed to rotate within the lever, but mine had some corrosion and lack of grease. My gear shift rod must have been loosely bolted to the bush instead of firmly clamped, so rather than the bush rotating inside the gearstick, the bolt was rotating inside the bush.

(https://i.imgur.com/qqViXWn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/q00GQBY.jpg)

One planned small modification was creating a 'short shift' gearstick, without structural changes to parts of the car. I have encountered many, many topics on 75 and GTV6 forums about various designs, each with pros and cons.

Part of the principle simply entails lengthening the gearstick below the pivoting spherical bearing (ie: the bottom of the stick, under the car). There is apparently more gain in Alfetta's, which have a shorter lower section than 75's. Also, if you can accept having to move your hand further from the steering wheel (which 'racers' won't like!), cutting the top of the gearstick shorter will help reduce the amount of 'throw' with each gear change. I plan to do this too. In Alfetta's, some people simply cut the lower end of the gearstick, then weld in an extension. I don't have welding equipment, and can't weld.

I think you also need to be mindful of over-doing it. If the throw fore/aft, and left-right gate, is too short, you risk mis-shifting and selecting the wrong gear (eg: wrongly downshifting from 5th to 2nd instead of 4th). And there seems a distinction between 'faster' and 'shorter' shifts: the relatively fragile synchros and dog gear teeth don't seem to cope well with fast gear shifts. Regardless, my modification is unlikely to produce a large shortening. However, I haven't done the calculations, but they will be easy to do and might update this topic accordingly. And basically, even an incremental gain is better than none.

The isostatic linkages on the gearbox will also be replaced and overhauled at a later date, to remove any slop and improve the feel.

Firstly, I temporarily reassembled the gearstick assembly into the car, and shift rod. The main limiting factor with extending the lower end is striking the chassis centre crossmember. I measured the clearance to be 11mm. Other obstructions in the area are an exhaust heat shield, that fits immediately below the gearstick, and the protective rubber boot which will be sandwiched between the gearstick and heat shield.

(https://i.imgur.com/VHO8zNk.jpg)

I decided to 'extend' the lower section of the gearstick by 9mm. Any more would unlikely fit without further modification, and any less would be...less! Again, without doing the measurements and calculations, this should approximate a 10% extension.

How? Well, I envisaged simply moving the spherical bearing on the gearstick 9mm upwards. Not only does this lengthen the lower section, it also shortens the upper section, both contributing to a shorter throw.

I marked the gearstick accordingly.

(https://i.imgur.com/QIvFNMp.jpg)

Unfortunately, this didn't prove to be nearly as easy as I anticipated. On inspection, the bearing is press-fitted onto the stick; but wow, how tightly?!

Attempting to apply force directly onto the bearing with my press proved fruitless. The angled design of the gearstick meant the stick merely flexed whenever the hydraulic press pushed down. I used my blowtorch to heat the bearing and all my tools in a makeshift manner, but couldn't focus the force appropriately. One attempt used a car stand at the bottom to support the end of the gearstick, then a vice gripping the middle, pressing onto the bearing via a spanner! It was stable, but the stick still flexed and slipped through the vice, instead of moving the bearing.

(https://i.imgur.com/6DeOUpy.jpg)

I nearly gave up, but had a week away from the car to think afresh. Meanwhile, I sprayed some penetrating oil onto the bearing, hoping it would loosen the fit onto the gearstick.

Realising I needed to support the stick directly below the bearing, I wanted a ring of metal in this vicinity. No welding equipment! So, visited a local welding workshop and they did the job on the spot. Removing the weld would be easy enough, with my grinder, but in retrospect, the bead doesn't obstruct the shift action within the assembly, and is hidden from view by the gaiter.

(https://i.imgur.com/wIi0UDN.jpg)

Now it worked! I threaded the stick through a ring spanner to support the welded ring of metal, in turn supported by the black hydraulic press plates. Then, a piece of 30mm wide steel box section - its internal width big enough to slide over the end of the gearstick - pushing against the adjustable spanner.

(https://i.imgur.com/rXZDS1V.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/XWG6HPn.jpg)

I still heated the bearing with the blowtorch, and after applying force, I heard a small 'twang' and the bearing started to slide. I pushed it to the 9mm mark, or just short, and after trial fitment in the car, the bottom of the shift rod clears the crossmember by 1-2mm. Hopefully that is enough to avoid the pieces touching during vibration.

(https://i.imgur.com/85rdZcU.jpg)

Whilst working on the gearstick assembly, I noticed a small amount of up-down movement of the stick within the housing. This was due to a very small gap between the white bearing seat + black plastic spacer + retaining circlip. 'Small', but still annoying, and possibly contributing towards the sloppy feel in the gear shift mechanism. Therefore, I cut a thin spacer to fill the gap, using clear plastic from old packaging. This was ~0.25mm thick, and perfect to remove all the up-down movement.

(https://i.imgur.com/HxoNjuS.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yAxyRfq.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/f6sc2LO.jpg)

Next, I started refurbishing the centre chassis crossmember. There was some surface rust, and the two original exhaust hangers had broken, replaced by only one welded hanger.

(https://i.imgur.com/mOvDcor.jpg)

I removed the remnants of the original hangers, and the replacement one, with the angle grinder. At Bunnings, I bought some galvanised wall hooks, then bent and cut them to fashion new hangers by mating two hooks together, for strength, per side. Of course, I could have visited an exhaust shop to weld new hangers, but where's the fun in that?! They will be riveted to the crossmember, but if too weak, I will have new hangers welded.

(https://i.imgur.com/7tTIc3N.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/zqMXmI3.jpg)

A 'mild' flap disc was attached to the angle grinder to strip the old paint and surface rust. I also cleaned the gear shift rod, and prepared the gearstick.

(https://i.imgur.com/e3MPE7n.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/pNhrazV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/72JWef9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/wq7yXoP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rFB43RA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/RBaUEU5.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/EpmoqaE.jpg)

The parts were sprayed with Etch Primer then Enamel Primer. After allowing to dry, they were sprayed with gloss black enamel.

(https://i.imgur.com/3dmVkYC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xCi7yJg.jpg)

Lastly, the heat shield over the exhaust catalytic converter was cleaned, with degreaser then high pressure hose, then scrubbed clean with a scourer. The gearstick sits above the shield where there is a rectangular depression on the top/convex surface.

(https://i.imgur.com/e8w0PIV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/QpmH9ef.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/slAMQ0g.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/pnHGEb4.jpg)

This work largely concludes the refurbishment of the chassis tunnel area. I am yet to purchase parts to refit the prop shaft. But next, I will commence work on the interior and complete the electrics, rather than the rear suspension and transaxle. The latter requires purchase of several expensive parts (springs, shock absorbers, antiroll bar, exhaust, vented discs and caliper widening spacers, etc), and because we will be relocating to our new house and garage towards the end of the year, I need to roll the car onto a trailer, and not have the De Dion dismantled. Once in the new garage, I will have ample space and the time to purchase parts and rebuild the rear.

See you next month.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on April 09, 2014, 12:42:16 PM
Pretty sure I remember you had CSC extractors? You won't be able to fit the heat shield with the extractors... Unless to make a new one or heavily modify the original [I don't remember how much it needed changing but my heat shield hit the scrap heap]

Edit: I might be wrong actually, I know when I lengthened my shifter it rubbed the heat shield, so I modified the shield to accommodate. Later on came my CSC, maybe it was a combination of the 2 that meant I scrapped the shield...
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 10, 2014, 10:34:29 AM
Yeah, CSC will be fitted.

Good point; I haven't tried to test fit with the heatshield, and it will likely foul the rubber boot covering the bottom of the gearstick. If so, I will modify the heatshield and gamble on the exhaust being ok. It will be a while before the full exhaust is fitted, and cats added.

How much did you extend your gearstick by?

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: TimD on April 10, 2014, 05:09:47 PM
Pretty sure I remember you had CSC extractors? You won't be able to fit the heat shield with the extractors... Unless to make a new one or heavily modify the original [I don't remember how much it needed changing but my heat shield hit the scrap heap]

Edit: I might be wrong actually, I know when I lengthened my shifter it rubbed the heat shield, so I modified the shield to accommodate. Later on came my CSC, maybe it was a combination of the 2 that meant I scrapped the shield...

I have CSC extractors on my car and they clear the heat shield.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on April 11, 2014, 08:04:10 AM
I have seen 2 different types of shift lever... Dad's '82 GTV was the same as yours, shifted the ball joint up the shaft [his had grub screws holding it in place], but mine was a single piece so I believed. I cut and welded a piece into the lower section and modified the shaft going back to the box [along with the linkages etc at the box]. I can't run the original rubber boot. It fouled the shield but I fixed that by bashing the clearance point larger with a big hammer! I ran standard front exhaust up to the cat with no problem, when I fitted up the CSC's the shield had to go, it just didn't fit.

TimD - Did you keep the full length of the CSC including the flex pipes? It's been a few years since I fitted mine, but I have seen CSC's without flex pipes, just wondering if that's why yours fits? I should crawl under the car tonight and have a look. It's on stands at the moment.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: TimD on April 11, 2014, 03:51:41 PM
Funny, my car is also on stands. But yes, I kept the full length with the flex pipes. So perhaps that is the reason.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 11, 2014, 08:51:50 PM
Have you fitted a catalytic converter(s)? I plan to have small diameter cats - 200 cell/in^2 - one per front pipe, instead of feeding into a single cat.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on April 12, 2014, 06:26:50 AM
I kept full length, fed into a single cat just where to old centre muffler went [actually just a cat body with a piped centre]. I didn't get under last night, went insulating my new house all arvo until dark.

Shiny - I intended to fit a offset Magnaflow cat one day. Clearance is tight, I can't roll a small Poweraid bottle under my car... But I just haven't got around to doing it.

(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/2-25-57mm-Offset-Offset-200-Cell-Universal-Magnaflow-Metallic-Sports-Cat-59905-/00/s/MjE2WDI3MA==/$(KGrHqR,!iYE7S57GrWyBPCwT4jOiQ~~60_35.JPG)

Edit:
Magnaflow Metallic Cat, Part number 59905
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 12, 2014, 09:57:30 AM
4" diameter is probably the smallest around, but I hadn't considered offset ones before.  8)

There's these photos of a CSC setup, which is what I had in mind. Looks like the heat shield is still fitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/18hrgcD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yBobmkY.jpg)

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on April 20, 2014, 07:01:23 PM
Alright, my csc finishes off and merges to y pipe, then past the crossmember to the cat. Flanges at the csc tips, then at the cat, so the y piece is removable by itself. The y piece and flanges are the culprit in my case, the reason the heat shield doesn't fit.  Might get that rectified if I ever use the offset cats and get the exhaust tucked higher up... Or once my flex pipes wear through...
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on May 11, 2014, 10:10:34 AM
Thanks for clarifying, jazig.k.  :)

Monthly update! I've made a start on the interior, and continued working on refitting the gearstick/crossmember.

I attached the new exhaust hangers to the crossmember. Initially, planned to rivet the pieces in position, but had inadequate space to manoeuvre the rivet tool. Instead, enlarged the holes slightly to accommodate M5 bolts; though, still riveted the tips of the hanger pieces together. The attachment also relies as much on JB Weld, so hopefully it holds together adequately. After curing, I touched-up the area with gloss black paint.

(https://i.imgur.com/zhr8Aex.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qfbCO78.jpg)

Taking some measurements, including distance from top of the original gear knob to the spherical bearing (~326mm). This, of course, is after repositioning the bearing 9mm upwards (ie: prior, would have measured 335mm).

(https://i.imgur.com/2VbH6mM.jpg)

This will be my new gear knob: a 'BLACK Carbon Nero'. BLACK is the brand, Made in Italy, and beautiful quality. 'Carbon Nero' the model, which speaks for itself; the carbon fibre is real, underneath a clear epoxy. The knob is aluminium and quite weighty, comprised of upper and lower pieces bolted together, and with this version, a red plastic central band sandwiched between. Different colour combinations and shapes are available. It's a universal fitment.

(https://i.imgur.com/CP6c7tG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/E3MayJM.jpg)

The BLACK gear knob trial fitted on the gearstick, confirming it sits in a similar position and distance.

(https://i.imgur.com/FNNKx29.jpg)

Based upon this, I shortened the gearstick by about 2.5cm/1" to shorten the 'throw', cutting off the tip. I discovered the stick is actually hollow.

(https://i.imgur.com/2n8kjf2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LQUkwCX.jpg)

The gearstick assembly was pieced together. PTFE-based Super Lube grease was applied to the spherical bearing, and Molygrease to the new lower bearing.

(https://i.imgur.com/EgcqyGX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/wZ4oPSC.jpg)

The following schematic was posted on the alfabb.com forums (http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/milano-75-1985-1993/19322-2nd-3-7-litre-24-valve-milano-project-15.html#post346492), created by 75 guru, Craig (http://www.users.on.net/~craigf/), who happens to live locally to me (though never met you, Craig)!

(https://i.imgur.com/hPYiEkR.jpg)

From that, I was able to use basic trigonometry to calculate the gear knob 'throw' distances:

*original gearstick:
~95mm forward/backward (eg: neutral into 1st/neutral into 2nd gear selection)
~190mm total throw (eg: 1st to 2nd selection)
~55mm side/side gates (ie: moving from 1st-2nd gear gate across to 5th gear gate)

*modified gearstick (repositioned bearing + cut shorter):
~76mm forward/backward
~152mm total throw
~49mm side/side gates

This equates to ~20% reduction in throw, which is worthwhile.

I replaced the original white foam gasket around the top of the housing with fresh self-adhesive closed-cell foam rubber.

(https://i.imgur.com/31GHD9M.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/59MfuGz.jpg)

The new rubber boot slid onto the gearshift rod. I found it best to slide on from the far end (opposite end to shown), which is 'round' rather than 'squared fork'; some detergent/water made it easier.

(https://i.imgur.com/luRK61J.jpg)

Bolted back onto the car. The new issue I faced was fitting the rubber boot onto the base of the housing; now too tight after extending the gearstick lower. However, I think I have a solution and will demonstrate next month.

(https://i.imgur.com/7Q8xVtk.jpg)

Now, switching to the interior. Shown with the Recaro interior partly fitted, which will eventually be retrimmed. Rear seat base already removed. Plastic door sill trims unscrewed and unclipped; one long piece per side, covering front + rear sills together.

(https://i.imgur.com/P92EvwZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/XQ5BNoC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/80lI6Xt.jpg)

Front seats being removed. The seats sit atop small circular plastic spacers (allowing the option to lower them ~5mm) and plastic covers over the metal chassis supports. Carpet pretty dirty.

(https://i.imgur.com/TOEiNgy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ah3dCQc.jpg)

Rear console unscrewed; screw under a carpet trim piece. Wiring passes to the power mirror switch, rear power window rocker buttons, and rear cigarette lighter. The cigarette lighter panel unscrews from the console for easier access to the plug.

(https://i.imgur.com/cYhhCZ2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/fFn3Gga.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/wwlYPST.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9QQiL0d.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9QQiL0d.jpg)

Centre console secured with a single bolt to the chassis at the rear.

(https://i.imgur.com/26ifsl9.jpg)

It sits on the carpet, and at the front is screwed and clipped to the radio console which in turn is screwed to the dash. Sliding the centre console rewards allows separation from the radio console.

(https://i.imgur.com/HWXm8V1.jpg)

Radio console removed. My car was fitted with an aftermarket cheap Pioneer headunit and will be replaced.

(https://i.imgur.com/U9RGOkW.jpg)

The handbrake assembly was unbolted from the chassis to facilitate removal of the centre console. Four bolts, with four spacers underneath. With the handbrake loosened, the centre console was swung up and over, then removed.

(https://i.imgur.com/4MxemxN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IAIR0oj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IWrDb7T.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/kWQRM67.jpg)

After a very thorough vacuum, the carpet presented quite nicely. A couple faded/stained areas will need attention: passenger side beneath the centre console, and rear central area over the transmission hump. Hard to know what caused this fading, but possibly some spilled liquid. And only several small patches of wear, particularly around the driver's feet area.

(https://i.imgur.com/UHLpv6k.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9QIlwrY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ir2uGKU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VOD1RcU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Cd2h8bd.jpg)

Under the rear seat is the speedometer signal amplifier. The speedo pulse signal is sent from the gearbox under the car to the amplifier, then onto the speedometer. This is where I can tap into the wires with the Dakota SGI-5 speedo regulator (to recalibrate the speedo after changing tyre size).

(https://i.imgur.com/77JKcIk.jpg)

On the right side under the rear seat, a random cut wire which I will investigate.

(https://i.imgur.com/RI9eSMi.jpg)

Carpet and sill clips run along the edge, and were unscrewed from the chassis. Then carpet simply peeled away and was removed.

(https://i.imgur.com/QlJehuq.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SDJ0DV8.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0y1eKsH.jpg)

Under the floor sound deadening, a fair amount of random rubbish! Including used and unused rivets, plastic, and cable ties.

(https://i.imgur.com/BgM4wrL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lZEYAbj.jpg)

On the driver/right side run the hard plastic fuel lines (from tank to engine, and return-line from engine to tank).

(https://i.imgur.com/ze2JC4I.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tjnB9Uf.jpg)

Carpet hung on the clothes line, using...the alligator clips on my jumpstart leads. First a snow foam soaking, then washed with the Karcher high pressure hose.

(https://i.imgur.com/iTASTbE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YinU64X.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KroerBa.jpg)

Preparing to remove the parcel shelf trim, first removing the seat back. Speaker grills are clipped to the trim. Then removing the 5.25" dual cone rear speakers, which are fitted to plastic frames bolted from underneath the parcel shelf.

(https://i.imgur.com/Z9fbqSZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/UDcq1Ba.jpg)

The left/right childseat restraint anchors, and their covers, obstructed removing the trim, so these were unbolted.

(https://i.imgur.com/ksD87YA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/N9WYy5n.jpg)

With the trim removed, the area was inspected and cleaned. Behind the seat and sound deadener, is the fuel tank in the boot. Access to the top of the rear shock absorbers (dampers) is also from here.

(https://i.imgur.com/wRlArtU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/gYzRzKo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DjBckRN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Mh27tN8.jpg)

Dust and perished foam on the shelf. The (black) wiring to the centre brake light appears to be a modification that I will need to inspect more closely to see where the power source originates; I suspect directly from the brake pedal switch because I saw a random black wire running along the right door sill.  All the other wires to the parcel shelf area originate from a wiring plug clipped from underneath.

(https://i.imgur.com/hkujWA2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ca20m93.jpg)

Parcel shelf cleaned.

(https://i.imgur.com/h2dVIA6.jpg)

This is the parcel shelf trim, and centre brake light. Access to the globe behind a cover.

(https://i.imgur.com/5Gp8bw0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/cDig5y9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Pqu63tS.jpg)

There is a storage bin under a lid, which is labelled for First Aid and Headphones. Indeed, headphone sockets were an option in some markets (unsure if it was in Australia, though), and the wiring actually exists but not the sockets. It would be easy enough to add sockets.

(https://i.imgur.com/2t3aCtC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nSDQdWU.jpg)

Sure enough, the carpet is very faded, despite being a nice blue-grey colour. The original dark grey was evident under the speaker grill. Inside the storage bin, the carpet is black.

(https://i.imgur.com/HPBPbuM.jpg)

Under the parcel shelf trim, metal support brackets are on each side, which are clamped to the shelf by the speaker frames. The wiring originates from a white plug, supplying audio to the rear speakers, optional headphone sockets, and what appears to be the centre brake light. But as noted earlier, the power to the brake light must have been modified, and cut from the original plug; I can only imagine the original wiring was inadequate to supply current if it was shared with the other brake lights. I will trace the wiring and determine if I can return it to the original plug with an upgrade using a relay.

(https://i.imgur.com/4xGmFlt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/QA3YWbq.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/b9Jx54q.jpg)

That was a long update, so thanks for reading. By next month, I should have completed the gearstick fitment, attend to the sagging roof lining, and commence some wiring upgrades.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on May 11, 2014, 08:52:09 PM
My '88 3lt has no shelf brake light? No marks from where it was if there ever was one fitted. I see most Alfa's on the AlfaBB have them so presumed it was an overseas thing, until i got my '88 Twinspark. Not that I'm interested in fitting one, I wonder if i have the wires under there...

Your carpet looks fantastic! Mine is shot.
I have read that Alfetta ones fit. I can only remember the foot rest being different, Alfetta having plastic rest bolted in after the carpet goes in and the 75 having it built in under the carpet.
Does anyone have a source for new carpets for either models? I actually wouldn't mind removing the foot rest if i had to use a Alfetta carpet, I have long legs.

I love the look of the shift knob, but it makes me cringe a little... The 3lt leather covered knob is amazing. It fits my hand perfect, the feel is perfect, the shape and size is perfect. I have never found a better knob. There isn't a method of shoving that knob around that is awkward or uncomfortable, IMO. If your knob was a leather one, I want it! It looks like the cheaper one though, which feels half as good... Damned Alfa bean counters...
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on May 13, 2014, 12:43:00 PM
My '88 3lt has no shelf brake light? No marks from where it was if there ever was one fitted. I see most Alfa's on the AlfaBB have them so presumed it was an overseas thing, until i got my '88 Twinspark. Not that I'm interested in fitting one, I wonder if i have the wires under there...

It's an interesting point of discussion, that has also taken place on the ausalfa forums where I also post. Seems it is a little inconsistent, and that the centre brake lights were probably fitted when the cars arrived in Australia (ie: not from the factory) to comply with ADR. The style of light can vary, and as with your cars, not always fitted!

Quote
Your carpet looks fantastic! Mine is shot.

Yeah, happy with the carpet, and will just 'touch up' the stains with black spray paint. I figure the car has rarely had passengers in it, and that the 135K km is probably genuinely low.

Quote
I love the look of the shift knob, but it makes me cringe a little... The 3lt leather covered knob is amazing. It fits my hand perfect, the feel is perfect, the shape and size is perfect. I have never found a better knob.

Ha, well I've not driven the car enough to realise.  :P

I'm pretty sure mine is leather-wrapped. Or at least, it has stitching, which appears faded (originally red or white?) and grubby. I'll have a closer look, and if it's leather, you can have it.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on May 27, 2014, 07:21:59 AM
Hello, I made my own pods for 6x9 with thin mdf for the base and an 12mm mdf for the base for the speakers.
I used pop sticks for elevation a can of form then trimmed it all up with a hobby knife and stapled vinyl on it. 
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/3805304/1987-alfa-romeo-milano/page-2/
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Duk on May 27, 2014, 07:34:38 PM
Where do you get your motivation from and can I get some too???  ;)

More nice work, BTW!!!  8) 8) 8)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on June 08, 2014, 10:08:09 AM
@ alphie: nice pods. But I have no intention of running rear speakers; only front + sub. Rears will be removed.

@ Duk: yeah, I'm happy to say I just keep feeling motivated. I think it's largely because I am in a routine of working hard for a full week, then family time, then finally having two days to myself (wife at work, kids in childcare) to do my own thing, so I end up really looking forward to continuing this project a couple days a fortnight.

It was a busy and productive past month. The basic plan with the interior is to strip back to the wiring looms, and by next month I should have the complete dashboard removed. Then I can integrate the alarm, perform various modifications and upgrades, and clean and inspect every part I remove before refitting. Any particularly worn or damaged parts will be replaced if possible, or somehow refurbished.

But firstly, the following is how I modified underneath the gearstick assembly to attach the protective rubber boot. I measured the outer diameter of the alloy housing lip: about 60mm; and the inner diameter of the rubber boot: about 56mm. Normally, the rubber boot would stretch over the lip to secure in position.

My idea was to create an extension or adapter using a cheap off-the-shelf part. Research narrowed down options to either plastic/pvc plumbing pipe, or metal exhaust step-down pieces. After visiting a local plumbing pipe retailer (ie: Bunnings!), I found a plastic irrigation Y-pipe that suited: the inner diameter of the larger end was about 63mm, and the outer diameter of the narrow section about 56mm. With a hacksaw, I cut off one end to create the adapter.

(https://i.imgur.com/axnCkrL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vndVWxX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jAfkGFg.jpg)

I used some scrap soft pvc plastic cut into a strip, to make a simple bushing, reducing the inner diameter from 63 to about 60mm, providing a snug fit over the gearstick housing. The soft plastic was from a pvc curtain much like this (http://image.made-in-china.com/4f0j00JvnEGtdgnikl/Polar-PVC-Curtain.jpg). The adapter was then attached to the housing with a hose clamp.

(https://i.imgur.com/JySjjHX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VKlsUza.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LfIErx6.jpg)

Refitted to the car, the rubber boot then slid over the adapter, and a second hose clamp attached this in position. Time will tell if it is adequately robust, but I'm confident it is.

(https://i.imgur.com/u9pk7r4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZcdqogZ.jpg)

Whilst happy with the result, there was of course a flow-on effect. The rubber boot now fouled the exhaust heat shield, so this required modification. The shallow indentation needed to be deeper, beginning with single cut, via a few drilled pilot holes then jigsaw.

(https://i.imgur.com/sIDEwAQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JYS71GC.jpg)

After using a mallet, the hydraulic press, and even standing on it (!), I reshaped the shield. Test-fitting confirmed the indentation was now deep enough.

(https://i.imgur.com/k17zjy1.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZdtCc97.jpg)

To 're-seal' the gap, I again used scrap parts in my possession, this time some 25mm/1" aluminium angle-bar.

(https://i.imgur.com/tTuCv2B.jpg)

The pieces were reshaped, then drilled and riveted to the heat shield. After some minor fettling, the result was quite satisfactory.

(https://i.imgur.com/YNag49C.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5iX3CXw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/hbQ52NV.jpg)

With the carpet, I sprayed the faded patches with gloss black enamel. Because they were small areas, I decided against the expense of specific carpet/vinyl paint.

(https://i.imgur.com/HNgKNgi.jpg)

Back to stripping the interior: removed the roof trim, with its sagging roof lining. I doubt my roof lining is original, and suspect it has been replaced previously, but I don't know what the original lining looks like (in terms of colour and cloth texture).

The rear of the trim is attached by screws behind plastic covers that simply pull off. An attachment point in the centre, and on either side.

(https://i.imgur.com/oEMZa5Y.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Tht4Nmt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZO6OAMv.jpg)

Then opened the covers on the grab handles to access bolts. Being careful to retain the stepped washers with each bolt; the washers allow the metal strap handles to slide, so that the handles can be pulled outwards to grab, or neatly pushed flat.

(https://i.imgur.com/DbZPZoG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lw2c6ZO.jpg)

Sagging roof lining very obvious in this photo. Attachment points at the front of the trim are by the sunvisors, and grab handle positions. The sunvisors are secured by two bolts for the hinged corner, and a screw for the retaining clip.

(https://i.imgur.com/vCKzbDJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/cuGkG7G.jpg)

Above the driver's seat there is no grab handle, but the bolts are behind cover pieces.

(https://i.imgur.com/MFIsOMl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nk03U5F.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nBu6pVS.jpg)

Once the rear and front bolts and screws are removed, the foam finishing trims detach from the sides.

(https://i.imgur.com/EjaKIQr.jpg)

A single nut/bolt secures the centre light panel to the roof, accessible after unclipping the spotlight.

(https://i.imgur.com/qzehwwx.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/V1lfCCB.jpg)

At the front, the rearview mirror unclips from a bracket, which is bolted to the roof through the switch panel. Behind the spotlight is another nut/bolt.

(https://i.imgur.com/laq53vW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vQOdm3V.jpg)

Very solid springloaded pins hold the rearview mirror to its bracket.

(https://i.imgur.com/MVdW7wj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jWiKEZW.jpg)

Once the front switch panel is released, the whole trim can be detached. This exposes the wiring.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZFStfxJ.jpg)

Along the sides, the roof trim is also supported by protruding ledges. Reasonable force was required to pull the trim over the ledges.

(https://i.imgur.com/uxipWHL.jpg)

Bare roof once the trim was removed. The wiring disconnects via plugs.

(https://i.imgur.com/QdnaaRE.jpg)

Top side of the roof trim. The light and switch panels are secured by star grab washers, and wiring looms neatly secured with hooks. The grab washers were gently bent and removed with small flat blade screw drivers and pliers, to release the panels from the trim.

(https://i.imgur.com/R0p0t28.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/AJStM9H.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Zn9U9Dd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/P0wTThI.jpg)

The sagging roof trim lining was easy to peel off. Found not to be a failure of the adhesive, but deterioration of the thin foam layer which was perishing. The grubby patch from the previous driver's head was yucky!

(https://i.imgur.com/zWTKipL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/6vKAJwp.jpg)

After peeling off the lining, the remaining foam required removal to recreate a solid base to apply new adhesive. I discovered my vacuum cleaner could scrape and suck off the foam very neatly without much effort. Resulted in a fresh trim ready for re-lining, a job for the coming month.

(https://i.imgur.com/9nBeoK4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/oDMlhtz.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/q1FNlL5.jpg)

Next job, I removed, cleaned, then refitted the B- and C-pillar trims.

(https://i.imgur.com/cARrU9j.jpg)

The C-pillar trims are secured by a single Christmas-tree clip, and a moulded 'hook' that slides within a metal bracket on the C-pillar. Plus the leading edge is overlapped by the door seal which pulls away easily.

(https://i.imgur.com/7eMAwPj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9peNrSI.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/948rrGK.jpg)

The B-pillar trims are secured by a single screw, and held along the edges by the door seals. The seat belt top anchorage point required unbolting. What initially appeared to be a crack in the trim was actually a moulded gap to slide the belt through.

(https://i.imgur.com/XTH1JEX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4LhZ3yv.jpg)

At the base of the B-pillar passes wiring for the rear door. On the right side runs the 'added' black wire for the centre brake light.

(https://i.imgur.com/H5I6M1S.jpg)

Left side like the right.

(https://i.imgur.com/6v43qTY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nstWsSY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sBopAx0.jpg)

At the base of the left C-pillar, I secured wiring with strips of self-adhesive Dynamat sound deadener. On each side I added a cable-tie clip, pushed into pre-existing holes, for the rear demister wires.

(https://i.imgur.com/BbRGYtl.jpg)

After the trims and areas behind were cleaned, the pieces were refitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/Uo8u7fd.jpg)

Next, made a start on the dashboard. A while ago, I sold the original steering wheel, with the intention of fitting an aftermarket MOMO version temporarily fitted here.

(https://i.imgur.com/XYDTRdb.jpg)

Steering wheel removed. The car was missing the lower steering column cowl piece. Two bolts secure the (light + wiper) stalk assembly.

(https://i.imgur.com/qroOysh.jpg)

Plugs and wiring for the stalks. The (left) light stalk has two upper plugs and a single main (red) power supply wire connected by spade terminal. The (right) wiper stalk has two plugs above and below. Single (purple) wire in the middle for the horn connected by spade terminal. All require disconnection to remove the stalk assembly.

(https://i.imgur.com/kNcndps.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/FZxiJrb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/og3hA2G.jpg)

Switch pods, either side of the gauges, unclipped from their base frames. They are held by a series of tabs. The switches are for hazard lights, rear demister, front and rear fog lights; plus a rheostat dial to change dashlight brightness. The frame required unscrewing from the dash to unplug the rheostat.

(https://i.imgur.com/7ZgKA6q.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IgOg4wm.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/8GF7sAm.jpg)

ARC (Alfa Romeo Control) and clock panel, and ashtray. The ashtray pulls out from its frame, revealing two screws securing the ARC panel. Then they pull away from the dash; the ARC panel has flexible retaining tabs at the top. Three plugs connect to the panel, one for the clock.

(https://i.imgur.com/yMZEwe8.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DtRHVGG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5Ax5ymI.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/RUspFht.jpg)

Below is the cigarette lighter and trim panel. The panel is clipped in position, and easy to lever off.

(https://i.imgur.com/lVS2Rxy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rhCw3uN.jpg)

With the above parts removed, 5 screws are revealed which secure the upper dashboard section in position. Interestingly, the workshop manual refers to 3 screws behind the cigarette lighter trim, compared with 2 on my car; presumably some versions (perhaps LHD) have the additional screw.

(https://i.imgur.com/i4PaX8p.jpg)

On the right side of the steering column, the small storage bin unclips from position, best levered out from the bottom. Behind the bin are 2 screws; through the gap above, behind the switch pod, are 2 additional screws. Well, should have been 2, but only 1 fitted in my car! The 4 screws help secure the upper dashboard section.

(https://i.imgur.com/YGgduzl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/giJGme7.jpg)

After all screws are removed, this section can be removed. Dashboard rotated forwards to access the plugs first.

(https://i.imgur.com/HMrd9dL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HMrd9dL.jpg)

Lastly, I removed the windscreen demister grill, which is metal. The grill is press-fitted in position, and can be levered off from one end.

(https://i.imgur.com/B793GCK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JMEtxiX.jpg)

That's it for this month. I should have the dash completely removed by next month and commence wiring upgrades. See you then.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Divano Veloce on July 04, 2014, 09:29:45 AM
Awesome writeup for anyone who wants to repair a sagged headlining in their 75!
Title: Instrument cluster tachometer fading
Post by: VeeSix on July 07, 2014, 10:57:39 PM
Will you be recolouring this faded section of the tachometer Richard?

Interestingly Richard in regards to the clock/warning lights, the first series 75s had a lot more information available here, they had distance to empty, average fuel used etc etc all at the push of a button the same as the 90, they removed these features in the series 2 and 3 75s, clamming down?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 13, 2014, 12:52:49 PM
@ DV: cheers :) . I still haven't had a chance to attempt retrimming with new headlining material.

@ VeeSix: well spotted. The red 'red line' has indeed faded. Are most cars like this now? I do plan to freshen it up, probably by carefully masking and spraying. I have some 'clear red' spray paint, though it may have clogged up by now.

Yes, I've read that earlier Oz-spec 75s have the trip computer instead of the plain clock. I thought about retrofitting, but it's not just wiring, and requires various sensors (eg: fuel flow, external temperature sensor) and control unit, from looking at the workshop manual. They are not features I particularly want, so I decided it's not worth the effort. But if you have the complete 'set', I'd give it more thought!

I've continued working on the dashboard area. Slow going, particularly cleaning everything, which had accumulated 25 years of grime. But one major task nearly completed was cleaning out the HVAC (heater/ventilation/air conditioning) unit.

Firstly, I removed the main dashboard after removing all attachments.

The centre and side air vents were levered-out.

(https://i.imgur.com/cEG2BF4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/V0BWWDm.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2AAHjK7.jpg)

To remove the cigarette lighter, the large rear 'ring nut' unscrewed, allowing it to come apart and slide out the front after unplugging. The backlight globe should be easy to change to an LED.

(https://i.imgur.com/1sqTs5w.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Lfnu2B4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qLPFAcJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vdkwOzM.jpg)

A cover trim unscrewed from the dashboard on the left. Attached to it was the ARC unit. A vacant area beside this is for a 'Performance Gauge' unit fitted to some cars in some markets. The ARC unit had seven plugs!

(https://i.imgur.com/E2RXPPI.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/UOvQE3H.jpg)

In the centre, the HVAC controls were attached by two screws.

(https://i.imgur.com/VpRnnw5.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xzMTXck.jpg)

The three dials and two knobs had various attachments: air flow distribution dial (left) was attached to a cable; heat control dial (centre) was attached to another cable; AC dial (right) was fitted to a thermostat unit, screwed to the back; air recirculation knob and fan speed knob were connected to spade terminal wires.

(https://i.imgur.com/BiE00hb.jpg)

On the right side of the dash, the main fuse board sat behind a hinged door. The hinge pins on either side were spring loaded, and retracted for removal.

(https://i.imgur.com/DJ9c7JW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/MFaIvVH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jU1oY0F.jpg)

A single screw secured the fuse board. Once released, it could be manoeuvred behind.

(https://i.imgur.com/YfbBAmZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PLYPJHv.jpg)

Above, a nut secured the central locking module. The module was accessible through the hole for the small storage bin.

(https://i.imgur.com/YBFwOsu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/bX9vAt4.jpg)

The protruding ignition barrel prevented easy removal of the dashboard. After removing the securing bolt, it unplugged and slid out from the steering column.

(https://i.imgur.com/yWUZ5yE.jpg)

Now, only fives screws held the dashboard in position, though it was supported by two large brackets on the firewall. Two screws on the left (though one was missing!), two under the demister grill, and one on the right.

(https://i.imgur.com/7o1nDhR.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/J7mZqPP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/65OMj0S.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/x7dYhmb.jpg)

Dashboard being removed. Two support brackets provided the main attachment points.

(https://i.imgur.com/5TW7Y5j.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JOn3Z2T.jpg)

But not so easy! Multiple wiring looms crossed behind, sandwiched between the back and the demister air duct. The duct required removal to release the wiring. Rather than screws, the duct was riveted in place; a little awkward to reach with a drill and side cutters. (I had to clean the windscreen to take the second photo through the glass!  :P )

(https://i.imgur.com/wuAirGn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/q2aMPBi.jpg)

Hurrah! Dashboard removed. Oh, the wiring!

(https://i.imgur.com/xKhKCXP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/hApLhpU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0UKCn7f.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rNzqDjQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vDhxhIA.jpg)

A-pillar trims unclipped, and wiring re-secured using Dynamat sound deadener strips.

(https://i.imgur.com/5IlCxAl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xuGX4Yb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SWY889l.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Er1kx3v.jpg)

Finally, I could start the process of inspection, cleaning, repairs and modifications/upgrades!

Beginning on the left, I connected the main 0ga powerwire from the engine bay.

(https://i.imgur.com/7YABtM7.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/V8cYTDi.jpg)

A Stinger T-distribution block (SPD512) was attached to the wire and screwed to the firewall. Stinger's 'Hyper Twist' wiring is indeed very flexible and had no trouble bending into position.

(https://i.imgur.com/8l9jdRU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tRCfIqn.jpg)

Decided to add another firewall grommet; this one a smaller 3ga version (Stinger PG12). Through it, I will pass some alarm wiring, and want to add a couple more senders and gauges (which I'll keep secret for now!). With the dashboard removed, easy access to drill a new (22mm) hole for fitment; bare metal edge protected with Cold Gal Primer paint.

(https://i.imgur.com/gruQM3p.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5y0u1so.jpg)

Grommet fitted with some silicone sealant. New length of 0ga wire connected to the distribution block, and split conduit tubing for additional protection against cuts.

(https://i.imgur.com/hHVWHI3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PNnwJIl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4wB9B4f.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YO7poGI.jpg)

Appropriate time to add speaker wiring for the future stereo system. Two lengths required each side of the car, to power the door woofers and the midrange/treble drivers, using Stinger 16ga (SHW516G). To pass into the door, the rubber protective tube in the door jam was pulled off from the car exposing the existing wires. Then the new speaker wire was threaded alongside the existing door wiring from the cabin to the door jam. However, it was too flexible and soft to push through the rubber tube. For jobs like this, I have a length of stiffer speaker wire (purple, in photo); I pushed the stiff wire from inside the door cavity (after removing door trim) through the rubber tube. Joined both ends of the wires (new speaker wire + purple threading wire) by wrapping in tape, then pulled the stiffer purple wire back up the tube, taking the new speaker wire with it.

(https://i.imgur.com/OKsQOCA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/p3a2oqt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/W0GWvZI.jpg)

The second length of speaker wire was not for the door, so placed in the footwell area. The two wires and the 0ga main powerwire were then passed along the door sills beside the existing wiring, and taped securely.

(https://i.imgur.com/kVfiyAy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4oHISIF.jpg)

In the rear, the wires passed over the wheel arch into the boot, and were again taped into position. Two potential hazardous areas - marked 'A' and 'B' - needed protection over the metal edges. Also note the emergency boot release cable which is usually tucked beside the rear seat, required if the normal boot release cable breaks.

(https://i.imgur.com/oek95FH.jpg)

A: the wires passed through a hole under the rear seat. Whilst easily big enough for all the wiring, I still covered the metal edge with split conduit, and around the 0ga wire.

(https://i.imgur.com/xua654f.jpg)

B: the hole behind the rear seat to the boot was also protected around the metal edge with split conduit.

(https://i.imgur.com/njz4rOi.jpg)

Back at the footwell area, I found one 'burnt out' connection: black wire, 15-pin plug. This was the plug for the wires running along the left side of the car to the rear door and rear of the car. Scouring the wiring diagrams in the workshop manual, I determined this to be the G73b plug, and wire in position 3, for the rear demister. It's unclear why it overheated, but I presume a fair amount of current flows through this wire.

(https://i.imgur.com/F5iB0RP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ylmnT9E.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/FAGMw3W.jpg)

I cut the wires and re-terminate with crimp-on bullet terminals. Plus, I'll later divert the wire from the rear demister to a relay, converting to a low-current wire, and will install thicker wire from near the battery (which will be in the boot, remember) via the relay.

(https://i.imgur.com/MCL0CrP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tATiQ2I.jpg)

Last inspection job on the left side was behind the protective shield in the footwell for the fuel injection control unit. I wasn't surprised to find only two of the three nuts held the shield in position; the third was loose on the floor under the carpet! I gave the shield and the footwell area a clean, then refitted it with all three nuts.

(https://i.imgur.com/RNQDPAa.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/V3uSXPh.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rdlhjri.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 13, 2014, 12:53:27 PM
Now, to the HVAC unit in the middle. Quite interesting to dismantle and inspect the design, to understand how it all works. Plus, to see how much debris became trapped inside!  :o

Removed the side air vent ducts, which were secured to brackets near each end, and pulled from the outlets on the main unit.

(https://i.imgur.com/fQFpi4z.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/EzZ2T3h.jpg)

Most of the foam gaskets/seals were perished, and simply crumbled when touched. Only the top seal - to the fresh air inlet under the windscreen - remained in good condition, and must be a different type of foam.

The HVAC unit unbolted from front brackets on each side, then pulled away from the firewall, releasing tabs slotted into two other brackets behind.

(https://i.imgur.com/h4cBPm3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ndvfboe.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7VTwyvP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/t0YMpiI.jpg)

I left the unit attached on the right side by the four hoses: coolant hoses to/from the heater core, and AC hoses to/from the evaporator. There remained adequate space to work on the unit.

The heater core fluid tap is opened/closed by cable, via the control dial. There is a thin copper probe (visible in other photos below) passing to the surface of the heater core; apparently, when the engine is cold and the heater dial set to the off position, the tap is less than 100% closed, allowing coolant to trickle through the heater core, presumably to prevent stagnation. As the engine and coolant warms, the probe also warms, conducting heat to activate a thermal spring inside the tap to completely close it off. True, I read it somewhere!  :P

(https://i.imgur.com/MwyJDhQ.jpg)

Lowering the unit provided a clear view and access to the rusted air inlet vent above. I previously repaired the other side of the vent when working in the engine bay, and riveted mesh to the opening to prevent leaves and debris entering. Additional repairs will be performed before the HVAC unit is re-attached.

(https://i.imgur.com/tQBYQTy.jpg)

There are four main pieces to the casing: top cover, lower section, sandwiching a fan cover between, and a front piece. They are screwed together around the edge, plus five clips at the front.

(https://i.imgur.com/groS6kF.jpg)

The main screws and clips were removed. The air distribution shutters were attached/hinged to the top cover; their cable and levers were attached to the fan cover underneath. After unclipping the hinge pins, the top cover was released.

(https://i.imgur.com/3rfAVNs.jpg)

A large volume of leaves and debris was found around the fan.

(https://i.imgur.com/xDwRjiS.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sK8wbid.jpg)

The fan cover was removed, and all the debris sucked away with a vacuum cleaner.

(https://i.imgur.com/f1rRjS5.jpg)

Then the fan unit unscrewed, disconnected, and removed. Time was spent cleaning the lower housing.

(https://i.imgur.com/xkuJI7x.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/eyb9OZy.jpg)

Two screws secured the front cover underneath. The cover was removed, after pulling the tip of the AC thermostat probe from between the fins of the heater core. The probe was pulled out through the hole at the base of the cover.

(https://i.imgur.com/1RrmHMg.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZaTFsqv.jpg)

The fan recesses were cleaned. There was a protective mesh cover on the left side, covering the resistor coils that alter the fan speed. They of course become very hot (low + medium speeds), so in this location the fan blows air over them for cooling. I could lift the heater core and evaporator partially clear of the housing. Plenty more fine debris found underneath, and caught amongst the fins, which I blew free using compressed air. New self-adhesive foam strips were applied to the sides of the heater core and evaporator; these seal against the plastic housing to prevent air flowing around the sides.

(https://i.imgur.com/1mXVADj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9FN4U7H.jpg)

Through the gap under the heater core and evaporator, a close view of the mesh, now cleaned. The mesh was plastic-welded in position, front and back. I used a flat blade screwdriver to break the front join and push the mesh aside to clean inside. This was not the proper method to access the resistors; they were accessed from underneath. After cleaning, the mesh was re-secured by melting the plastic again using a butane-heated hot knife.

(https://i.imgur.com/K3n287x.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KWkf0XO.jpg)

From underneath the HVAC unit, the resistor board was secured by a clip, and attached to four wires. Adjacent was the hose (detached, in photo) to drain condensation that accumulates on the AC evaporator.

(https://i.imgur.com/fqrPrq9.jpg)

There are three fan speeds. Low speed is generated by power passing through a higher-resistance coil (thinner wire, more windings), resulting in low voltage. Medium speed is generated by power passing through a lower-resistance coil (thicker wire, less windings). Full speed is generated by allowing power to pass directly to the fan without resistance, via the 'straight bar'.

(https://i.imgur.com/KZbdbnq.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/im47XXm.jpg)

The fan unit comprised the motor and two 'squirrel cage' centrifugal fans. I presume the small metal clips attached to each fan function as balancing weights. The fans were pulled off the spindle for cleaning. A very small amount of engine oil was applied to the solid bearings for lubrication.

(https://i.imgur.com/ql5U82u.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/1L4qcSi.jpg)

After cleaning the fans, they were re-attached, and the unit refitted to the HVAC housing. The back of the metal bracket slid into a slot in the housing, and the front secured with a single small screw. Impossible to reverse the polarity of the wires connected to the motor; one had a male spade terminal, the other female.

(https://i.imgur.com/paj1uxn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/kktEn3k.jpg)

The fan cover held the air flow distribution shutters via cable and levers. Two shutters shared the single hinge, and were spring loaded against each other.

(https://i.imgur.com/oLWgZQ1.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DCoqU3e.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KDCBMcA.jpg)

These were cleaned, and new self-adhesive foam strips applied to the shutters.

(https://i.imgur.com/KC8I6Vc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IlONtZj.jpg)

The fan cover secured to the lower housing by a single screw. Though, when the top cover was fitted, screws also held the fan cover in position around the edge. Foam strips were applied along the top of the heater core and evaporator, to seal against the fan cover.

(https://i.imgur.com/31r7Ddk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/6OXcecs.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/fuXGLGF.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jzuiPxc.jpg)

Now the top cover. At the front was the air outlet to the windscreen demister vents; at the top was the fresh air inlet; at the rear was a motor to move the air recirculation flap. From underneath, you can see the screw holes around the edge.

(https://i.imgur.com/omCM5J9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sJ5xUa6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GPeQVjJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/8nz3YE4.jpg)

The recirculation flap and motor cover were removed and cleaned. The flap had a vinyl cover, originally over a thin layer of foam, which had perished, leaving the cover loose. New foam was applied, then the vinyl cover glued in place with contact adhesive.

(https://i.imgur.com/1tSELmd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dN2W0HA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nD6FHMK.jpg)

Top cover cleaned, and new foam applied around the outlet joining with the demister vent. Air recirculation flap refitted and attached to the motor.

(https://i.imgur.com/ogNL0qQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0h9DHpe.jpg)

One of the plastic tabs on the side of the top cover was broken; the tab slots into the support on the firewall. Using some scrap 3mm aluminium (the holes serve no purpose here; they were previously drilled), I fashioned a replacement piece, and trimmed the excess plastic for fitment. The aluminium was fastened by bolt and nut. The motor cover was riveted back in position.

(https://i.imgur.com/DzBPrgK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/kjsP0ii.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tvwqDrB.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dxxUh51.jpg)

Before refitting the top cover, I needed to fix the circular recirculation air inlet vents. Each vent was meant to have two swinging shutters, but three were missing and the remaining shutter was warped. I was unable to readily source replacements in good condition, but (member) VeeSix offered a pair from an Alfa Romeo 90 which are higher quality. Thanks David!

These were smaller in overall diameter, so not a drop-in replacement. They otherwise seem similar in design, with two shutters each, that swing open when air is drawn through. The crossbar provides strength, but does rob cross sectional air flow. Overall, they don't allow as much flow as the original 75 versions which have no crossbar, but I doubt I will notice a problem (so long as any turbulence is not detracting).

(https://i.imgur.com/XcgR6dH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SkXncLW.jpg)

After considering different options to fit the 90 vents, I decided to integrate the frames and shutters into the 75's circular rings. I removed the 90's protrusions with the Dremel to create flat pieces; then modified the 75's rings by cutting off the supports for the original shutters.

(https://i.imgur.com/rnsUo8s.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/26sSNnb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/kT1g94c.jpg)

The 90's frames were glued to the 75's. The gap around the edge was filled with silicone.

(https://i.imgur.com/9j7PFCR.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/gzmVFM3.jpg)

The outer surface was sprayed with Plasti Dip Black, and the shutters refitted. Not a perfect cosmetic finish, but they will be up behind the dashboard out of sight.

(https://i.imgur.com/brueudS.jpg)

By re-utilising the 75's rings, the modified inlet vents slotted straight into the housing. Each retained by a toothed clip.

(https://i.imgur.com/FP77V97.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/WOapH6h.jpg)

The top cover was screwed back into position.

(https://i.imgur.com/emwHpOT.jpg)

Here, I've indicated the various directions of air flow: air flowing into the HVAC can be either fresh air from above, or recirculated air from the sides and behind. Air flowing out can be via the demister vent, front/side vents, or the downward floor vents.

(https://i.imgur.com/GVRtpw9.jpg)

It took me some time (!) to comprehend where the floor air vents were, and how they received air. Firstly, there were no vents underneath where I expected; secondly, one side has the cable passing through making it appear to be...a hole for the cable, and the other has the heater tap/hoses directly underneath, seemingly obscuring air flow. Thirdly, it wasn't obvious how the air reached the vents.

With the top cover off, I've indicated how the air flows from the fan, through the evaporator and heater core, then back up over the top of the fan cover (where the shutter cable/levers are) and out the sides (in the photo, the shutter is resting in the closed position, which would normally block flow to the floor vents). The top cover encloses this route.

(https://i.imgur.com/uuQYH9p.jpg)

These photos show the difference between fresh air and recirculated air, depending on flap position. For fresh air, the flap is pulled back for direct passage to the fan.

(https://i.imgur.com/L49nwnr.jpg)

For recirculated air, the flap blocks fresh air flow, and now opens from the rear; air flows from behind the dash to the fans. Recirculated air also enters via the side inlet vents.

(https://i.imgur.com/dYCMZCh.jpg)

During fresh air mode, some air is likely to enter via the side inlet vents. And during recirculated air mode, the workshop manual suggests 15% remains fresh air. However, with the flap closing off the fresh air inlet, I can not see how fresh air can enter; it becomes completely sealed-off. There appears to be several different versions of the HVAC unit, catering for non-AC cars and RHD vs LHD; thus, a different type probably allows 15% fresh air.

That concludes this month's update! Thanks for looking through all the photos. Next month, I endeavour to mount the HVAC back into position, and work in the area on the right side (pedals, wiring, steering column, etc).

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: MD on July 13, 2014, 06:21:51 PM
shiny,

Got a question for you. When I took my evap. unit apart for servicing, the control knob for the "open"/"closed" air selection was not wired up but a whole bunch of wires were lose. I have tracked down the motor connections and all the wiring to the little black box with the blue relays in it. However I need the wire colour code for the control switch connections and the pin numbers that they connect to. Can you help?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on July 13, 2014, 07:16:40 PM
My rear window heater works now, burnt out connector just like yours actually! It only gets 10v at the window though so still have some supply issue. Might be a common problem?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 13, 2014, 07:48:51 PM
When I took my evap. unit apart for servicing, the control knob for the "open"/"closed" air selection was not wired up but a whole bunch of wires were lose. I have tracked down the motor connections and all the wiring to the little black box with the blue relays in it. However I need the wire colour code for the control switch connections and the pin numbers that they connect to. Can you help?

This is how the recirc knob is wired in my car:

C: NC
L: (single) pink
M: white with black dashes
H: NC
B: (double) black (with right-angle spade terminal)

This is how the fan speed knob is wired in my car:

C: (double) pink
L: yellow
M: purple
H: grey
B: yellow with black stripe

(double: two wires connected to the single terminal)

My rear window heater works now, burnt out connector just like yours actually! It only gets 10v at the window though so still have some supply issue. Might be a common problem?

Could be. 10V doesn't seem right at all.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: MD on July 13, 2014, 08:45:59 PM
jazig

The demister is a high current using device and if you have measured this voltage while it was in actual use, the voltage may be reasonably close to being normal. Especially if the alternator was not running well above idle at the time of measurement.
If your battery is anywhere near marginal (and located in the engine bay) especially in cold temps this time of the year, I would say just live with it.

shiny.

Thanks for the info. Sending a PM.
Title: 75 project update
Post by: VeeSix on July 14, 2014, 04:58:30 AM
Another fantastic update thankyou Richard

Re red line fading, yes Richard, all the 75s I have had come thru were of similar appearance except for the occasional one with tinted windows, not so bad, I think your careful masking and respraying method should work well

What are you going to do pedal cover wise Richard, stick with rubber or go metal?

I am not sure if you know or not but the 75 originally came with nice rubber covers that had the Alfa Romeo emblem as a centerpiece

You appear to have got off lightly re the inlet rust, the 90 and 75 suffer badly from this area, I have seen complete sections basically gone, I am currently stripping a 75 3.0 the same as yours and it's double your lotto win

Fantastic job with the vents, yes maybe just short of the 75 originals flow but a hell load more robust

Re your moving the battery location, repairing rear demister line and adding a relay, in speaking with you previously you had mentioned you had not had much to do with the 164, out of interest Richard the 164 has the battery mounted on the left side in the boot and just ahead of it a relay with fuse for the rear window demister, I will attach a photo  :)
Title: 164 rear window demister relay with fuse
Post by: VeeSix on July 14, 2014, 05:03:06 AM
The 164 gets a lot of the same type melting around the fuse location similar to your connection find  ;)
Title: Alfa Romeo 90 and 75 series 1 clock
Post by: VeeSix on July 14, 2014, 05:12:11 AM
Attached is a photo Richard out of interest of the clock with all the extra features from the 90 and 75 series 1, notice the extra buttons, off memory actually the 33 series 1 gold clover leaf had the system as well and possibly the Alfetta 2.0 gold clover leaf, just above the clock is a probe looking piece of plastic with wire and connection, this is the temperature sensor and was located on the 90 and 75 just behind the right side headlight, basically slid into a hole which went into the front of the wheel well area and took the reading from there, bet if you checked your 75 the probe support hole would be there  :)
Title: Re: 75 project update
Post by: shiny_car on July 14, 2014, 04:10:45 PM
Another fantastic update thank you Richard

Thanks David. :)

Quote
Re red line fading, yes Richard, all the 75s I have had come thru were of similar appearance except for the occasional one with tinted windows, not so bad, I think your careful masking and respraying method should work well

What are you going to do pedal cover wise Richard, stick with rubber or go metal?

I think repainting the 'red line' should work ok.

I have a set of new pedal-pads to fit. They are Zender copies (I first saw Zender ones as aftermarket parts for the 156), which are metal, with horizontal rubber inserts. I had them on my 156, currently on the 155, and bought a set off eBay for the 75. I prefer the metal-look; more sporty.

(https://i.imgur.com/th1pqge.jpg)

Quote
You appear to have got off lightly re the inlet rust, the 90 and 75 suffer badly from this area, I have seen complete sections basically gone, I am currently stripping a 75 3.0 the same as yours and it's double your lotto win

Yeah, the rust isn't too bad. I already patched it from the other side, but I have seen photos of cars from the UK, where people are forced to cut out the whole section and rebuild! Fortunately, Australian cars have generally held up well because of the environment.

Quote
Fantastic job with the vents, yes maybe just short of the 75 originals flow but a hell load more robust

Cheers, they turned out well. Thanks again for providing them.  8)

Quote
Re your moving the battery location, repairing rear demister line and adding a relay, in speaking with you previously you had mentioned you had not had much to do with the 164, out of interest Richard the 164 has the battery mounted on the left side in the boot and just ahead of it a relay with fuse for the rear window demister, I will attach a photo  :)

OK, interesting. Having a relay definitely seems a good idea, to avoid the long length of high-current wiring. Ditto the headlights and starter solenoid. All benefit from upgrades for both functionally/reliability and safety.

just above the clock is a probe looking piece of plastic with wire and connection, this is the temperature sensor and was located on the 90 and 75 just behind the right side headlight

Cool. Do you have a pic of the fuel flow sensor, and where is that fitted?

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GTVeloce on August 12, 2014, 12:02:03 AM
My rear demister worked, but only just. To improve the voltage at the glass, I installed a relay in the boot covering (GTV) where the fuel vapour separator lives. Feeding this was easy as my battery is already in the boot. Once I hooked it up, full voltage at the window!

However, the existing relay in the fuse box under the dash chatters terribly when I switch it on. It sounds like it is constantly switching itself on and off. I just used a simple four pole relay with terminal 30 coming from the battery; 85 just earthing to the body close by; 86 coming from the black wire that normally feeds the window and then 87 going to the window.

Any thoughts why it would do this and how I might rectify it?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on August 17, 2014, 06:35:36 PM
@ GTVeloce: that's how I intend to wire my demister, but I don't know why your dash relay is chattering. What I'm unclear about is whether the dash relays are a simple SPST (single pole, single throw) relay like the new boot one; I suspect not. Or whether the dash relay has an inbuilt timer or some sort of sensor to determine when the demister is hot. The new additional relay may be causing havoc with the dash relay. However, you could try a replacement, in case it is faulty.

Not as many photos this past month, but most of the work entailed wiring the alarm system. There were over a dozen connections to be made, which meant referring to wiring diagrams to help locate the relevant wires, plenty of soldering and heat shrink, and creating a 'neat' and reliable installation. Can alarm wiring ever be neat?!

However, first I re-installed the HVAC unit. The air inlet rust was cleaned with a wire brush, then coated with Cold Gal paint. The area was made smoother using bog.

(https://i.imgur.com/zyQ4HmJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/L0OT4Xd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5Xi2ua8.jpg)

I cut a basic paper template, then two pieces of fibreglass matting. Polyester resin, thickened with Q-Cel thickener, soaked the matting into position. In the cold weather, I used a heat gun to speed up curing, though managed to singe a few strands of matting.  :P Finished with a coat of Alfa Rosso 130 paint. This area is not visible from the engine bay, so the result did not need to be perfect.

(https://i.imgur.com/UYVWUVG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/8Qh1e83.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/feo130q.jpg)

I eventually replaced the original foam around the inlet vent with new closed-cell foam. The HVAC unit was bolted back into position but I've lost that photo! So I'll show you next month.

(https://i.imgur.com/x6rYDza.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sqdKDJj.jpg)

Moving across to the right side of the dash area; the steering column is adjustable for tilt and reach (tilt-slide). The whole area was oily, which attracted dust and dirt. I suspect some indiscriminate spraying with an oil aerosol created the mess.

(https://i.imgur.com/2kflyZk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SwC71S7.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xnTwI9R.jpg)

Wax & Grease Remover was used to wipe the area clean. I detached the clutch master cylinder from the pedal, cleaned, and re-greased, plus new stainless steel split pin.

(https://i.imgur.com/AnC5mLK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KsaJ543.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/18r7AkX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OktK5kV.jpg)

The brake light switch sat above and to the right of the steering column. Whilst it was very firmly in position, the locking nut was not tightened. The wire for the rear central brake light was 'secured' using a Scotch-lock clip (these can be unreliable).

I tidied the area by removing the wire attachment (will relocate via a relay in the boot), with heatshrink over the exposed wire, and tightened the locking nut.

(https://i.imgur.com/xeBMDss.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SbrZQKA.jpg)

In the top right corner behind the dash sat this array of wiring looms and plugs, and a major ground wire attachment point (labelled G52 in wiring diagrams). The plugs simply unclipped apart, and the back sections unclipped from the metal support bracket. The support bracket was secured by two bolts.

(https://i.imgur.com/IMDMJm9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/qCYS80b.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KEfvzqF.jpg)

The ground wires attached to the metal terminal bracket, which in turn was bolted to the dash. As such, the only electrical connection to the chassis was through the bolt. But appeared to be little 'bare metal' contact; the paint was still in place, with the connection relying on the bolt threads, although even the thread inside the nut appeared painted. So not a very good connection (though still obviously worked), and one that I decided to upgrade.

(https://i.imgur.com/TjaTIKr.jpg)

I used a length of 4ga wire, hex-crimped with lugs on each end. An unused 6mm hole was located nearby in the kick panel area. I used the Dremel to remove the paint back to bare metal, and threaded a bolt into position. Then secured the 4ga wire.

(https://i.imgur.com/KNIZ14F.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3bZupY3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rw8ih7T.jpg)

The 4ga wire was secured to the original ‘G52’ ground point terminal bracket, and plugs refitted. I found an additional set of plugs hanging loosely below, carrying the wires to the front right (driver's) door, which I clipped into the proper position.

(https://i.imgur.com/6Flfmk8.jpg)

This was the central locking control unit, and associated wires for integration with the alarm's remote locking feature. The design uses the common setup of a 'negative trigger' to activate the unit: when any of the sensor wires (two from each front door lock) detects a 'ground', the control unit activates the central locking motors in all other doors to follow suit. For example, if you manually unlock the driver's door, the 'unlock wire' in the door is grounded; when the control unit detects this, it unlocks all the other doors too. Likewise, when manually locking the door, the 'lock wire' in the door is grounded, and the control unit locks all the other doors.

Remote central locking works by connecting to a pair of 'door lock' and 'door unlock’ wires, any door. The remote unit pulses a 'negative signal’ to the wire (ie: temporarily grounds the wire via a relay), causing the factory central locking unit to lock/unlock all doors accordingly. Remote central locking alarms can be configured to suit any car, whether they require a negative trigger or positive (+12V) trigger, or something else.

The sensing wires in the car were:
front right door: brown (unlock) + purple (lock)
front left door: brown/white stripe (unlock) + purple/white stripe (lock)

It was evident a remote central locking device was previously fitted into the car. Remnants of wires were attached to the brown and purple wires in the kick panel area on the driver side.

(https://i.imgur.com/1FxaqLB.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/K3KKRy8.jpg)

Power for the alarm, siren back-up battery charging, and upgraded supply to the CD headunit was created via a spare 9.5mm blade terminal on the back of the fuse board. All three fused wires were combined and crimped to a single 9.5mm terminal, insulated with heatshrink.

(https://i.imgur.com/PnQjg2A.jpg)

One ground wire for the alarm (there are two because alarms provide a back-up wire in the event one fails), and ground wire for the headunit, were fastened to the new ground point via ring terminals. The area was then protected against corrosion with grease.

(https://i.imgur.com/J8nlYwE.jpg)

3-point immobilisation was a feature of the alarm, so I chose three suitable critical wiring paths to tap into: starter, fuel combo-relay trigger wire (relay to activate fuel injectors and fuel pump), and fuel pump powerwire. The principle of immobilisation is diverting these wires through the alarm, where relays open/close the circuit. With the alarm activated, these circuits are 'cut' and the car cannot be started. Alternative choices would be wiring for the ECU, injector control unit, ignition coil, and igniter.

All three wires were amongst the plugs behind the dash. Rather than cut each wire, I separated them from their plugs, then connected each end to the alarm. The immobiliser wires and relays are rated to 25A; instead of thick wire to meet this rating, the alarm uses two thinner black wires per connection, which you may notice in the photo (ie: two thinner wires, each capable of handling at least 12.5A).

(https://i.imgur.com/5EZQzvm.jpg)

And after completion of the main alarm wiring, everything was relatively neat and tidy.

(https://i.imgur.com/2uNz6jo.jpg)

Over the next month, I will endeavour to complete the wiring behind the dash. See you then.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on August 18, 2014, 09:52:04 AM
Hi shiny,
I like my spaghetti with sauce lol .
I take my hat off to you I'm not is brave as you to take out the dash .
but I will have to, to take my dash and spray it black with VHT vinyl paint .

cheers mate keep up the good work, Shane
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: MD on September 15, 2014, 04:59:23 PM
Shiny,

Just finished the rebuild of the air conditioner on the family 75. Got it working a treat but I had to get a bit tricky to do it. When eventually you get around to rebuilding yours, here's few tips for you.

1 The thermostat location on the outflow side to the evaporator is wrongly placed and causes a long delay in the compressor cycles. To fix this you need a new thermostat ( mine cost less than $20) with a 500mm capillary and the tube should be inserted directly into the evaporator core.

2  The thermostat itself is often a sloppy tolerance and it needs to be "reset" to cycle the compressor on and off in a much shorter duration than they often are- say 3* above set point. The one in mine went +12* before kicking in and by this time the cabin temp went too high.

3 Recalibrating the thermostat is not that hard and is it done in two stages (a) the bellows return is restricted so it doesn't go back further than 10*. This gives it faster cycling duration.(b) the internal switch that activates the compressor requires adjustment by the available screw which is usually sealed at the factory. To do this, rig up a light to act as the compressor. Power up the switch contacts. Continue to screw the adjuster until the light comes on. Back it off a quarter turn. What this will do is dramatically shorten the time the bellows take to make the switch contact.

If all else is good, this modification is the cherry on the cake that ensures a stable temperature in the cabin without ridiculous rise and fall swings.

Cheers.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 16, 2014, 09:55:22 AM
cheers mate keep up the good work, Shane

Cheers mate!

Just finished the rebuild of the air conditioner on the family 75. Got it working a treat but I had to get a bit tricky to do it. When eventually you get around to rebuilding yours, here's few tips for you.

Thanks MD, I appreciate that! You've certainly sorted yours out nicely; I don't have such a good understanding of the intricacies of an AC system, but that all makes sense, so I'll look into it once the car is back up and running.

 8) 8) 8)

This month's progress was hampered by several events, including sale of our 159SW, and purchase of a *cough* Blue Oval car, and some minor man-flu, but also bad sleep from a crying kid with baby-flu  :( .

Firstly, a few photos that would have fitted with last month's update. This is the HVAC unit fitted back into position.

(https://i.imgur.com/8MM05F3.jpg)

And these show the wiring on the right side of the dash, helping put into perspective the position of plugs and looms shown in photos during the alarm installation.

(https://i.imgur.com/hhYPYcH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tsYODtn.jpg)

Onto a modification, this is a powered right side door mirror, and matching blanking triangular trim piece (I had already dismantled the mirror to inspect, hence the blue masking tape over the glass). They are from LHD cars (mirror from Europe off eBay; trim piece from US alfabb.com forum member). 75's have only one power mirror, on the 'passenger door'; hence, RHD Australian cars have a left power mirror and manual right mirror. Opposite in LHD cars. This modification fits my car with two power mirrors.

(https://i.imgur.com/wTBqlwy.jpg)

The power mirror will replace the manual mirror, and triangular trim.

(https://i.imgur.com/l3rEEUH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JK3aO6R.jpg)

The door trim and sound deadening 'padding' were removed to access the door wiring. I will be refurbishing the doors (windows, exterior handles, etc) in detail in the future, and will revisit dismantling pieces at that time.

(https://i.imgur.com/eFTCqgW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ln1rAvg.jpg)

The existing door speakers and wiring will be replaced, so the redundant speaker wires and plugs were removed. The wires pass out through the rubber 'tube' inside the door, across the door jam, and into the cabin.

(https://i.imgur.com/jyeVhRr.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OcQqZlv.jpg)

After cutting the plugs, the wires were pulled back. It was easy enough to identify the wires in the loom in the cabin; also needed to unwrap electrical tape that bunched the wires together. Also used the two speaker wires to 'pull through' new wiring. The power mirror operates from three wires. Two new wires (yellow + blue) were taped to the end of one speaker wire, and pull back into the cabin.

(https://i.imgur.com/009OZso.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7XgFLzm.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IfUnh5E.jpg)

To the second speaker wire, I attached the third new power mirror wire and some stiff figure-8 (purple) speaker wire. After pulling the new wires as far as the door jam, the tape was unwrapped. The stiff figure-8 wire was left in this position to help feed new speaker wire.

(https://i.imgur.com/Kp0cLeJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/QRl2eLi.jpg)

The original grey/black speaker wire was then rejoined to the blue wire and pulled completely through into the cabin. Followed by new figure-8 (matte grey) Stinger HPM Series 16 gauge speaker wire fed from the cabin into the door jam, then taped to the purple speaker wire, and pulled into the door. The second blue wire was marked with a 'black stripe' using a marker pen to distinguish it from the other blue wire.

(https://i.imgur.com/aTVzKA3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xB3FGyI.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/fSlbeEu.jpg)

I checked the left door to see how the wiring was installed. My new right mirror had the plugs, so I needed matching plugs to connect with the new wiring.

(https://i.imgur.com/r7Fd4xR.jpg)

Rather than fit a new aftermarket plug (would have been easy enough though), I determined the speaker plugs were the same. The old speakers and plugs were being removed anyway, so I had the opportunity to attach them to my new power mirror wiring. Note the door speakers were not original, but aftermarket VDO 2-way coaxial 4x6".

(https://i.imgur.com/s7ocKC5.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/bCaOTaA.jpg)

Test-fitting the speaker plugs with the power mirror plugs.

(https://i.imgur.com/XxJO2zX.jpg)

After consulting the wiring diagram in the workshop manual, I soldered the corresponding wires in the plugs with the new power mirror wiring. Of course only three wires in use, with one removed from the plugs.

(https://i.imgur.com/NC7QpPB.jpg)

The three new power mirror wires were then neatly threaded through the car, following the loom to the meet with the existing wires for the left power mirror.

(https://i.imgur.com/ygd9hZZ.jpg)

Where the loom passes under the floor carpet, there is a connecting plug. The yellow wire is a shared ground/negative wire for all mirror motors (two motors in each mirror). Here was a good place for the wire to branch to the left and right mirrors, and therefore join the new yellow wire to the existing. I also misread the wiring diagram because it is written for LHD cars: notice the existing two wires to my left mirror are 'blue + blue/black'. Rather than install another set of 'blue + blue/black' wires for the right mirror, I strictly should have fitted 'yellow/black + blue/yellow' wires. Of course, it doesn't matter.

(https://i.imgur.com/0bgrxMb.jpg)

I couldn't find terminals amongst my spares to fit the new blue wires into the black plug, so it was easier to use an aftermarket plug. I could also have run the wires in continuity, without a plug, but you never know if you have to disconnect the wiring looms at any stage, even if unlikely. The yellow wire was soldered to the existing.

(https://i.imgur.com/NYdoXaV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/gG6UeI1.jpg)

The final wiring connections were for the blue wires into the control switch plug. I determined the terminals were the same as those in car radio ISO plugs. I had a spare plug, so cut two ends from the radio plug and soldered to the blue wires for the power mirror. The wiring diagram showed where to fit the right power mirror wires.

(https://i.imgur.com/zriiIY5.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/TLcNH4z.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KBmOJMz.jpg)

Here, the plug is fitted into the back of the mirror control switch and completes the modification! However, I am yet to test that it all works because the car has no battery fitted. I am confident it will work, but when I have time, I will 'bench test' using my external power supply.

(https://i.imgur.com/IFwsQi4.jpg)

Next job, attaching the main power feed to the fuse board. A while ago, you may recall I discarded the original power wires, which originated from the engine bay (battery > starter motor wire > extension to terminal board > 2x wires to fuse board). This was the old photo showing the original wires:

(https://i.imgur.com/hMl0Zi1.jpg)

Now the car's electrical system will be supplied by a single 4ga power wire. Using the two original 9.5mm tab terminals remained the easiest option, so I carefully unravelled the groups of wiring strands into two smaller branches. New terminals were crimped to the wire (reinforced with solder), and insulated with heat shrink tubing.

(https://i.imgur.com/fZU7V9N.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0zVTez0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ESUA0Iu.jpg)

The wire was connected and laid across the floor for connection to the distribution block on the passenger side. I need to wait until the dash is refitted to know exactly how long the wire will be, before cutting and connecting.

(https://i.imgur.com/OL016F0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VLdOFtx.jpg)

Final task for the month was installing new speaker wire through to the boot. Like the passenger side, two sets of figure-8 Stinger HPM Series 16ga wire; one for a new door speaker, the other for a new speaker mounted in the cabin. The two sets of wire were secured together with electrical tape, and passed alongside the existing wiring loom by the door sill.

(https://i.imgur.com/kruJYF3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/hfwLDNJ.jpg)

Under the rear seat, the wiring passes through a couple holes in the metal brace. More plastic split conduit was fitted around the wires to reduce the risk of chaffing and short circuits. Notice one of the main ground wire connections under the seat (called G63a in the workshop manual); there is a similar one on the left (G63b). The fuel vapour return tube also runs along this area.

(https://i.imgur.com/ihCMNCH.jpg)

Here, the wiring runs over the rear wheel arch behind the rear seat, before entering the boot through a small hole. The seat belt was unbolted from the lower anchorage point for easier access.

(https://i.imgur.com/oUqKyYB.jpg)

That's it for the month! A few minor areas require tidying up, but I am close to refitting the carpet and reassembling the dash.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GTVeloce on September 16, 2014, 10:54:43 AM
Great work as always Shiny.

I'm puzzled; are you going to install an amp (or two) for your ICE? Your wiring suggests not unless it is going to be under the dash but given the great care and attention to detail you have done with the electrical system to date it would be such a shame not to have the system amplified.

If you are going to install it under the dash, where? Or do we just have to wait with baited breath till the next update?  :D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 17, 2014, 09:48:27 AM
Thanks. :)

ICE (of the music kind!  :o ) is another hobby of mine. So yes, there will be a relatively simple system installed by my standards, and will include a 4-channel amp to run the front speakers 'actively' (8" door woofers + 3" wideband drivers (mid-tweeter)), and a second amp for a sub, all via an Alpine headunit and PXA-H800 digital processor. Nothing too bulky or heavy, but high quality installation and sound. Most gear will be boot mounted, including the amplifiers.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on September 17, 2014, 02:01:52 PM
(8" door woofers + 3" wideband drivers (mid-tweeter))

Keen to see you fit 8" in the door! I was measuring and eye balling up my 8" mid woofers to see where they would fit and how much custom needs to happen... I put them back into the cupboard. I'm not keen enough to make a new door panel.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 17, 2014, 07:26:07 PM
Yes, so am I! I don't think the magnet/motor will end up 'within' the door cavity, if it's mounted in the convention 'bottom front corner' of each door (and definitely not the stupid factory position!). As such, it will require a decent 'build out', and need to be done cleverly to look integrated and factory. But hey, that's a challenge I look forward to.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GTVeloce on September 17, 2014, 11:31:40 PM
That makes far more sense. However, I still don't quite get your speaker wiring placement. Wouldn't you just run the door wiring straight to the boot in preparation for the amp? And the run a pair of RCA cables and a trigger cable from the head unit back as well? Like I said before, maybe I am getting ahead of myself and you are in the process of doing that shortly.

I installed my amps and sub in a custom made enclosure that went where the rear seats would normally have gone in my GTV. Helped keep the weight central and low plus gave me more storage room behind the front seats whilst retaining the full boot space. Just so long as you don't want to carry any more than two people...
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on September 18, 2014, 11:21:28 AM
That makes far more sense. However, I still don't quite get your speaker wiring placement.

My photos may be a little confusing.  :P

A 4-channel amp will be in the boot: 2 channels for the woofers, 2 channels for the wideband drivers. The speaker wire I've installed does go to the boot: door cavity to boot + footwell area to boot (2 sets of wire on each side). Another amp will run the sub.

The headunit + processor connect via a proprietary Alpine ('Ai-NET') 8-wire cable, which includes the audio signal instead of RCA cables, and remote trigger wire. The processor will probably end up in the boot, and short RCA cables and remote trigger wires will connect to the amplifiers.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GTVeloce on September 18, 2014, 11:51:14 AM
Ah, all is explained. Thanks.

I looked up that processor, the Alpine PXA-H800 digital processor. That is some seriously cool gear! I am very happy with my setup but that looks like it would great fun to play with and am always happy if I can improve my sound quality further. I especially liked the RoadEQ. It kind of sounds like noise cancelling headphone tech which I could definitely do with. I have eliminated most road noise and wind noise through new rubbers and lots of dynamat/dynapad etc but my loud exhaust still comes into the cabin but I am not keen on changing that!

Of course my ideal would be a switchable exhaust where I can change the path via a solenoid but I'm still trying to work out how best to accomplish that (short of just handing a stack of cash to someone else).
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 27, 2014, 04:08:02 PM
Sorry for the late update! It's been a busy period, both car and non-car related. But quite a few smaller jobs were completed last month.

One small job involved re-doing the right rear 'G63a' ground point. None of the grounds were bare metal, covered with a thin layer of primer paint. This obviously must have worked, but I prefer bare metal, so after unbolting the wires, the area was sanded back to bare metal. Conductive carbon grease was applied between the metal and the first ground wire. After bolting all the wires back into position, normal grease was applied around the area for protection against corrosion.

(https://i.imgur.com/ueMfk3j.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7YuQcmo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/wpAotta.jpg)

I also located the rear window demister ground wire, and removed it from the connection at G63a. The wire was around 1m long, which must contribute some resistance, particularly as the demister draws relatively high current. I will cut it much shorter, and ground the wire under the window; generally, electrical conduction 'via the chassis' (body panels) is lower resistance than 'via a wire'.

(https://i.imgur.com/8PpEwNk.jpg)

The last under-carpet cables were fitted for the car audio system, which will feature an Alpine headunit and CD changer in the dash, and a digital processor in the boot. Alpine 'Ai-NET' cables (a proprietary 8-wire bus cable) connect the headunit and changer to the processor, plus the changer will feature a Toslink fibre optic digital audio connection. I originally planned to install a digital-output headunit too, but when I bench-tested my old one, it was faulty; sadly, such models are discontinued and not readily repairable, so instead I will fit a new Alpine model without digital output.

Two Ai-NET cables and two generic Toslink fibre optic cables (but only installing one).

(https://i.imgur.com/44lnw5I.jpg)

The cables were fitted under the dash, along the central tunnel, under the rear seat, and into the boot. A small opening in the sound deadening trim under the rear seat was cut to pass the cables.

(https://i.imgur.com/uHSzam6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sN461gt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/aJLStJE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tNDGOMk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LdGSZsW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/se6TwWO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/UUVz4W9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/6u2lfT3.jpg)

I followed the suggestion from Craig's Place (http://www.users.on.net/~craigf/rearwindowgrounds.htm) to upgrade the rear power window ground wires. These wires pass from the switches (in the console between the front seats) to the ground point behind the dash above the fuse board, G52, making the wires over a metre long. Craig suggested adding wires from the plugs to a nearby point on the chassis. However, I preferred to cut the wires and ground to the chassis nearby; I saw little point in keeping the original wires intact.

I separated the wires from the wiring loom and unclipped them from the closest plug.

(https://i.imgur.com/ucjFR4y.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/O9HaOY3.jpg)

The new ground point was via one of the handbrake assembly securing bolts, where I sanded back the paint to bare metal. The ground wires from each window switch were cut shorter, and terminated together with a crimp-on ring terminal, then secured in position by the handbrake assembly bolt.

(https://i.imgur.com/Ssnwhho.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OuryJjm.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Pewsx77.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5qqbSOv.jpg)

Next job, installing the electronic speedometer adjuster, a Dakota SGI-5C Universal Signal Interface. This device can alter the electrical signal feeding the speedo, to recalibrate and make the speedo accurate, and particularly useful when gear ratios or wheels/tyres are changed. In my situation, the new 18" wheels/tyres will be significantly larger in overall circumference, which would ordinarily result in a speedo reading 'too slow' for the actual speed the car would be travelling.

By fitting the SGI-5C, I can increase the signal feeding the speedo, to make it read faster and match the actual speed of the vehicle. I will eventually calibrate the unit by driving with a GPS unit.

(https://i.imgur.com/pJXi3ft.jpg)

With assistance from Kevin Redden's Alfa Romeo Milano Registry tech article (http://www.alfamilano.com/projects/plat-tranny-speedo-fix/speedo-fix.html), it was a simple installation. I modified my wiring slightly compared with the article, but the connections were still the same. The basic connections were:
1. +12V power
2. ground
3. fitting SGI-5C 'in line' along the speedo signal wire

The car's Jaeger speedo pulse signal amplifier was under the rear seat, left side. A 'speed pulse' originates from the gearbox and feeds into Jaeger unit via wires in the black plug. The signal is amplified and sent via a wire in the white plug to the speedo. The 3 wires in the white plug were different colours depending upon whether the wires were coming directly from the Jaeger, or from the car loom. You will notice the signal wire coming out from the Jaeger is white, but after the connection in the white plug, it changes to grey.

(https://i.imgur.com/FMIF0rA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LiubmDM.jpg)

To install the SGI-5C, +12V power was tapped from the pink power wire feeding the Jaeger, adding a short branch of red wire, soldered and insulated. The signal wire was cut, and to one end I soldered/insulated white wire, to become the 'signal input' to the SGI-5C. The other end of the signal wire was joined to the 'signal output' terminal on the SGI-5C. Basically, the signal wire was cut, and the SGI-5C now fitted 'in line'. A new black ground wire was connected from the interface to the nearby ground point (G63b 'left rear ground point'; paint sanded back to bare metal).

(https://i.imgur.com/gCG6r5N.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4alXb5N.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/O2jimc1.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LBUaVW3.jpg)

A detailed photo of the SGI-5C connections. As per the tech article, I used 'OUT 3' and set the switches 1-2-3-4 to ON-OFF-OFF-ON respectively. Once the car is up and running, I will obviously notice if these are correct. The UP-DN buttons are for calibration.

(https://i.imgur.com/sCdRp23.jpg)

This was my result in renewing the roof lining. Not perfect, but not bad. If the material sags again, I will take it to a professional trimmer next time. It took two attempts; the first resulted in a bad appearance over the 'hump' in the middle. I found this challenging because the material could not stretch sufficiently; perhaps stretchier material is available? After much thought, I covered the hump as below.

I chose a colour darker than the original light grey, and with a fine woven texture rather than 'felt-like'. Though, the felt-style material may be stretchier. The material is lined with a thin foam layer.

I laid the trim on the ground over newspaper. Notice the dark remnants of foam still stuck to the trim after my first failed attempt. Out of the packaging (eBay purchase), the material still had crease marks, but these disappeared once glued into position. A close-up shows the grey foam underside. Kwik Grip spray and liquid contact adhesive were used.

(https://i.imgur.com/wqQg9I9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VH6EPES.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tFqaP50.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/gp0xHGO.jpg)

This close-up shows the contours of the central hump.

(https://i.imgur.com/rc9QMuR.jpg)

Rather than a bad result from poorly stretching the 'one piece' material over the hump, I created separate 'side pieces'. First, the main material was sliced both sides of the hump and through the middle, after careful measurement. Then progressively glued in sections, leaving only the hump.

(https://i.imgur.com/oanezTd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/iP6SNlW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DAq1Zer.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SkOaDky.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/8rezzeS.jpg)

The edges were trimmed neatly (eventually to be hidden behind other roof trims), and folded and glued at the front and rear ends, like the original.

(https://i.imgur.com/zGaBkH2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/QmtJJLA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/XJ2EXJS.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7AqkF9C.jpg)

To cover the hump, the two 'flaps' were first cut roughly and glued.

(https://i.imgur.com/HVgHmig.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vFm1Ru5.jpg)

Once glued, the edges were carefully reshaped with a knife, leaving small sections to be patched. Then paper templates were cut to match each side.

(https://i.imgur.com/HoheabP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/aU8N57b.jpg)

The templates were transferred onto new material, and cut to shape. The pieces were cut approximately 5mm bigger around most sides. Then the foam was removed around the oversized edges; the shape of the intact material (with foam) matched the templates.

(https://i.imgur.com/rVJCXXX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/eNk4ILL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nK5PkDB.jpg)

Masking tape outlined the area for contact adhesive to be applied. The side pieces were then carefully laid in place, with the material edges overlapping the main piece, covering the edge-to-edge joins underneath.

(https://i.imgur.com/vbTXbQY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sG3N1Bj.jpg)

In bright light, the overlapping cloth is obvious though neat, and I hope once fitted into the car above my head, it won't bother me, particularly as the hump will be behind me!

(https://i.imgur.com/7anL3UU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/wot3xHX.jpg)

The roof panels had scuff marks. These were filled with bog, sanded, then covered with spray putty.

(https://i.imgur.com/7mlXy8x.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/M0B5Llp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5bQYcUD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/p0FeLyu.jpg)

Finish coat was black Plasti Dip spray paint.

(https://i.imgur.com/o7VKhwJ.jpg)

That will do this month! The next update will be due in a couple weeks, and I will show the modified roof panel switches featuring LED backlights.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GTVeloce on October 27, 2014, 05:43:53 PM
Good work as always. I recently had a go at doing my own headlining with some success. I tried a slightly different but mostly similar approach. I stripped my old liner off and cleaned up the board. I couldn't find a liner I liked and decided to re-use the old one! So I carefully cleaned it (in the washing machine!) and it came out nicely.

The foam I bought from Clark rubber for peanuts and just cut to shape. Like you I couldn't get the hump right but since this was just the foam that wouldn't be seen I also cut and shaped it around the hump. I glued it down with 3M spray adhesive. It came up well as can be seen from the pic.

Once dry, I then glued the fabric down but I found I could not get the length right. Maybe it had shrunk slightly but it still sited perfectly from side to side, only front to back it seemed about 1.5cm shorter than I wanted. My car is no show car so I decided to deal with the fact it wasn't going to be a perfect job. Once on and installed it looked great and worked well.

Until the first hot day. After the second hot day the glue was useless and had come away - both the foam from the board and the fabric from the foam. So, my method was ok but a much stronger, or better still, a heat resistant glue is needed. I noticed you used a similar spray adhesive but also a brush on adhesive. Does the brush on have better heat resistance?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 28, 2014, 10:38:43 AM
Until the first hot day. After the second hot day the glue was useless and had come away - both the foam from the board and the fabric from the foam. So, my method was ok but a much stronger, or better still, a heat resistant glue is needed. I noticed you used a similar spray adhesive but also a brush on adhesive. Does the brush on have better heat resistance?

Yes, I'm a little worried about heat during summer. I redid the lining in my 155, and it sagged again.

I checked the heat rating on various products that I saw in different stores. The Selleys Kwik Grip in my photo was the highest I found, rated to 130 degrees celsius (both the spray and brushable). I'm a little dubious about the spray, because it's such a fine layer; but spray is necessary for the back of the material because the spreadable/brush-on adhesive would clump and soak too heavily and distort the surface.

I ran out of the original spray, then discovered Selleys changed the product! I couldn't find the same version again, and their new one is only rated to 70 degrees! I only needed to use the new spray on the material over the hump, so hopefully that is adequate. Time will tell.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GTVeloce on October 28, 2014, 11:51:16 AM
I just looked up the heat rating on the 3M product and it is only 40C! Live and learn I guess. Now I'm tossing up whether to redo it or just pump a whole pile of staples in it!
Title: 75 project update
Post by: VeeSix on November 06, 2014, 10:06:07 PM
Great update Richard, why does the 75 have the speedometer amplifier but the 90 does not, are they not the same or very similar systems?

I have not had to redo a headlining as yet but my 75 one is currently a little loose, no centre lump to deal with though in a sunroof version  ;D, I remember 33s having a non felt covered roof lining, nothing to collapse just a nice solid interior roof, it would be good to get to the bottom of this adhesive issue though, what product do the professional installers use?  :o
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: MD on November 06, 2014, 11:05:54 PM
VeeSix,

Quote
Great update Richard, why does the 75 have the speedometer amplifier but the 90 does not, are they not the same or very similar systems?

Maybe this photo will clarify your question.The differences in the Jaeger sender configurations is probably just a stage of available parts at the time of production but the end signal from either combinations amounts to be the same in the end. Hope that makes sense.
Title: Re: 75 project update
Post by: shiny_car on November 07, 2014, 10:21:20 AM
Great update Richard, why does the 75 have the speedometer amplifier but the 90 does not, are they not the same or very similar systems?

Maybe this photo will clarify your question.The differences in the Jaeger sender configurations is probably just a stage of available parts at the time of production but the end signal from either combinations amounts to be the same in the end.

Thanks for answering that MD, because I would have had no idea!  ;D

Quote
I have not had to redo a headlining as yet but my 75 one is currently a little loose, no centre lump to deal with though in a sunroof version  ;D, I remember 33s having a non felt covered roof lining, nothing to collapse just a nice solid interior roof, it would be good to get to the bottom of this adhesive issue though, what product do the professional installers use?  :o

The flat headlining in SR cars is a bonus. I read a tech article on the internet for such a car, and it looked very easy.

In the past I've used a contact adhesive bought from VyFab, professional vinyl suppliers, but hey, no longer have that tin and don't recall any specs. From google, a lot of so-called "high temperature" contact adhesives are rated to around 90 deg celsius. It seems to make the discontinued Kwik Grip that I have exceptional, if rated to 130 deg C.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: festy on November 09, 2014, 01:34:24 PM
In MD's pic, all 3 are reluctor (VR) sensors, #1 and 3 have an amplifier in-built whereas #2 is just the bare sensor so relies on an external amplifier. I see it uses the same circuit board as #3, but without the amplifier components installed.

There's also a 4th type of speed sender that's completely different to these three...
Recently I fitted a Jaeger speed sensor to my Alfetta, I think it was off a 116 Giulietta.
Having only 2 terminals I assumed it was a VR type, but it turned out to actually be a simple reed switch :o
This type of sensor is obviously not interchangable with the other three.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on December 08, 2014, 07:07:47 PM
After this update, there may be a gap for several months, due to the Christmas period, and moving house. Finally, I will have proper space and all my tools at-hand again. In the meantime, I need to pack all the parts neatly and safely in preparation for the move. Then load the car onto a trailer for a 30 minute drive down the highway.  8)

Over the past month, I trialled and fitted LED backlights to the buttons in the roof panels. It's a nice cosmetic upgrade (even if I won't be driving at night very often), with the bonus of lowering power consumption.

I took inspiration from this post on some Taiwanese forums: http://www.alfaclub.com.tw/viewthread.php?tid=36268&extra=page%3D1

These were the switches for the panels, including spares I accumulated. More LEDs will be fitted to the dash switches (and I'll do testing for the dash gauges to see how effective it is).

(https://i.imgur.com/KpNt2cg.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/t2WTz9v.jpg)

The original incandescent bulbs and LEDs were a T5 fitment (socket shape). I purchased from eBay, green, white, and red (Italian colours of course!) to experiment with, though only fitted green and white for these switches. The LEDs were for 12V use, prefitted with suitable resistors (ie: green LEDs operate at about 2.1V; white LEDs operate at about 3.4V).

(https://i.imgur.com/CW0nfWD.jpg)

The original bulbs press-fitted into holders that fitted into the back of these switches. Each bulb was covered with a green 'sock' to provide coloured light. Strangely, every bulb in my switches was blown! Of the four or five terminals, two were for powering the bulbs, and the others for the switch function.

(https://i.imgur.com/nzGmgcZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vikK2wk.jpg)

LEDs are polarity-sensitive, meaning they only function when inserted the correct orientation: positive power to the anode, and negative to the cathode. They don't fry if reversed; they simply don't work. Either trial-and-error fitment, or look for the anode and fit accordingly (those familiar with LEDs will recognise the anode/cathode). The Alfa wiring diagram and wiring loom determined the polarity for the switch terminals.

Connected to an external power supply, this was the comparison between the original backlight (using an intact bulb from the clock) versus green LED.

(https://i.imgur.com/NefsFVl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/O51Ear8.jpg)

This was green versus white LEDs, being tested. I finally chose white LEDs for the push button switches.

(https://i.imgur.com/vceqSNT.jpg)

These were two different rear power-window lockout switches. The original was shorter. The longer one was a different fitment, but happened to fit into the centre armrest console (below the power mirror switch) where there was a dummy switch/blank. I will use this for another purpose, and show fitment in the future. I don't know what model Alfa it was from, so I am curious to know if someone is familiar with it.

(https://i.imgur.com/Ii8vi7v.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/pkGoopA.jpg)

The bulb holder for the longer switch was different. Carefully unclipping the switch face revealed a cylindrical holder which pulled out, and also functioned as the green light filter.

(https://i.imgur.com/U1z0lws.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/M15gLkB.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/V9Cn7zA.jpg)

The LED wouldn't fit into the holder but easily fitted directly into the power socket inside the switch. Tested here, and keeping the colour green.

(https://i.imgur.com/aTCWJFN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rFHYX74.jpg)

These were the front power window switches. This article at Craig's Place (http://www.users.on.net/~craigf/windowswitches.htm) was very helpful in providing additional information and confidence to open and modify.

I levered the guts from the casing using a small jeweller's screwdriver. Inside, under the face, was the green light filter.

(https://i.imgur.com/nZV9NxK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rIuqHVt.jpg)

The incandescent bulb was soldered to a dedicated positive terminal, and a common ground/negative terminal.

(https://i.imgur.com/Jh4FNbp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/QlXz344.jpg)

The switch plates were carefully removed, and the circular contact points polished clean.

(https://i.imgur.com/IZwZbf3.jpg)

I tested a 'single white' LED in place of the original. The LED was removed from its plastic T5 case, and you can see the resistor.

(https://i.imgur.com/U4Zileb.jpg)

I transferred the insulating tubes from the original bulbs to the LED prongs. After some testing, I chose to use double green LEDs for the window switches.

(https://i.imgur.com/HBbIHu5.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/1KhwoFn.jpg)

This shows the two green LEDs carefully soldered into position, then tested.

(https://i.imgur.com/7cpoBt0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/cJ6v4qM.jpg)

This was the comparison between '1 white' versus '2 green' LEDs which helped decide the final configuration.

(https://i.imgur.com/O3aRcl0.jpg)

Then original versus double green.

(https://i.imgur.com/awUD6Dh.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jfkZN6k.jpg)

A similar upgrade was performed in the rear power window switches.

(https://i.imgur.com/8ZPZdvL.jpg)

Here, I carefully unclipped the rocker switch face from the casing, then reassembled to show a different perspective. There was a reasonable amount of space to accommodate the two LEDs.

(https://i.imgur.com/TOOGwcu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/L26nCPZ.jpg)

I tested two modified rear window switches together below.

(https://i.imgur.com/3dQWH4f.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IxFImXN.jpg)

After the LED upgrades, I refitted switches into the front panel for final testing. The wiring loom was reconnected to each switch, and the power supply connected to the loom. The results are pleasing.

(https://i.imgur.com/Mr0TF5b.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LeRSpJV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dirDiyS.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Rc8BoN3.jpg)

These were the spotlights, for the front and centre roof panels. I replaced the incandescent W5W bulbs with LED versions which were brighter and whiter.

(https://i.imgur.com/Menc5xB.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/eRUE8eq.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3wNWYuY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nuD4nMl.jpg)

Then, I upgraded the 36mm festoon main cabin light bulbs with LED festoons.

(https://i.imgur.com/8aKZXut.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/frXBcne.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ulqb0AN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/6DzXjZV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NBkwJ1a.jpg)

Unfortunately the 12-LED festoons (after researching further, these were determined to be 3538 type SMDs (surface mount diodes)) were not very bright, and a blue-white colour. I then tried CREE festoons. A single CREE festoon was brighter and whiter than the 12-LED versions.

(https://i.imgur.com/B6vwH9x.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/aWEoUbe.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HYRYOW5.jpg)

These were 3W CREE versions, and still not quite as bright as the original bulbs. I have found 5W and 10W versions for sale which I will try.

(https://i.imgur.com/R7jrIFb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GZqMSUl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0eGRbFc.jpg)

You may have detected in the photos with the CREE festoons, that the roof panel was fitted to the roof trim. The front roof panel with spotlight was first refitted, re-using the star circlips, wiring loom retainers, then reconnecting the wiring loom. I had reference photos to ensure everything was refitted correctly.

(https://i.imgur.com/UnW8lDL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/BixmA4p.jpg)

The centre roof panel was refitted, re-using the star circlips, wiring loom retainers, then reconnecting the wiring loom.

(https://i.imgur.com/nPxb14l.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HavNIQr.jpg)

Now finally the roof trim panel refurbishment was completed.

(https://i.imgur.com/GDkhpO5.jpg)

That’s it for now. Have a Merry Christmas everyone. See you after New Year!  :D
Title: Alfa Romeo 75
Post by: VeeSix on December 09, 2014, 09:31:44 PM
Love your work Richard, very in depth, this thread will be a great future resource  :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: bteoh on December 11, 2014, 04:43:19 PM
Richard,
Great work as usual. What did you end up with regarding the overhead lamp - Did you use the 5W Cree or 10W Cree? I noticed ebay has a 15W cree. Not sure how bright that might be?

Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GTVeloce on December 12, 2014, 11:33:12 AM
I wound up using 2 Aerpro SMDx6. I found they gave a 'good' amount of light. Whereby I could actually see everything in the car at night with the light on but not too bright that I stood out every time I opened my door! At $20 each they weren't cheap but I think well worth it.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: bteoh on December 12, 2014, 03:17:45 PM
Hey Julian,
Where did you get the aerpro bulbs from and what wattage were they? I am also hoping to swap the bulbs on my GTV6s to get some respectable light . Currently they are hopeless :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on December 12, 2014, 09:48:50 PM
Richard,
Great work as usual. What did you end up with regarding the overhead lamp - Did you use the 5W Cree or 10W Cree? I noticed ebay has a 15W cree. Not sure how bright that might be?

Cheers.

I haven't upgraded the 3W CREE's yet. No rush. I also want to try and research/find specs on heat dissipation compared with the original incandescents; I don't want to risk melting the light panel.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GTVeloce on December 14, 2014, 08:00:23 PM
Quote
Where did you get the aerpro bulbs from and what wattage were they? I am also hoping to swap the bulbs on my GTV6s to get some respectable light . Currently they are hopeless :)
I bought them from Auto One in Melbourne but I see Super Cheap also sell them.
http://www.supercheapauto.com.au/online-store/products/Aerpro-SMD-Interior-LED-Lights-White-6-x-SMD-Festoon.aspx?pid=283925#Recommendations

I can't remember if it is 36mm or 41mm. I also put some in my GTV but to be honest, the bigger issue is the placement of the lights (behind your head!). I made some custom lights and wiring (just using the wiring from the door switch) and installed them in the kick panels. Now all four lights come on at once. Not perfect but much better than before.

Sorry for the highjack...
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: filippo parisse on March 06, 2015, 08:21:32 AM
Un bel lavoro!!
Quote
Where did you get the aerpro bulbs from and what wattage were they? I am also hoping to swap the bulbs on my GTV6s to get some respectable light . Currently they are hopeless :)
I bought them from Auto One in Melbourne but I see Super Cheap also sell them.
http://www.supercheapauto.com.au/online-store/products/Aerpro-SMD-Interior-LED-Lights-White-6-x-SMD-Festoon.aspx?pid=283925#Recommendations

I can't remember if it is 36mm or 41mm. I also put some in my GTV but to be honest, the bigger issue is the placement of the lights (behind your head!). I made some custom lights and wiring (just using the wiring from the door switch) and installed them in the kick panels. Now all four lights come on at once. Not perfect but much better than before.

Sorry for the highjack...
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on March 27, 2015, 07:12:49 PM
Must be almost due for another timing belt, right?  ;D Maybe something to include in another update?
I'm on arvo shit ATM, so just re-read through the whole thread. Still inspiring stuff
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on March 28, 2015, 09:38:39 AM
Ha, thanks. :)

Unfortunately, no updates! I'm still in the process of sorting out the garage space in the new home, so I'm some way off being at the stage or resuming work. Though I'm eager to get back into it!  :(
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: julianB on May 14, 2015, 12:37:07 PM
Shiny car- firstly, congratulations on all your work- this is simply incredible to see - most of us have fiddled with our cars, but you're taking things to a whole new level!

Loved the shifter mods and something I had planned to do very soon- thanks for the rundown on that!

I've trawled through and may have missed details, but I'd like more info on your tarox discs...
I have some 156 GTA series two brembos that will need discs soon.
I'm running 17s on my GTV6...

Keep the posts coming... That thing is going to look great with the kit and superleggeras on it!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on May 16, 2015, 01:30:32 PM
Cheer Julian

The discs I have are 2-piece Tarox, with steel discs and aluminium hats (non-floating). I bought them from an online store in Italy where I have purchased other products before (but as with any overseas store, I strongly advise touching base first via email, to ensure they are 'there' and confirm pricing including postage; things change, so if you don't hear from them, go elsewhere with your money).
http://www.ricambituning.it/en/index.asp

Unfortunately, they were expensive, totally around A$1400 including delivery. And A$ was stronger back then too IIRC.

Discs: KMRD0038
Centre hats: just ask for matching hats to suit the above discs for the 75
https://strg01c.suyara.net/download/T1cAAL0EAAAvOGV9dDpyazYoZg1 (Tarox download page for .pdf of discs)

The next major step is brackets for your calipers. I had mine custom designed and machined by a local engineering workshop in Geelong. I took one set of caliper + disc + hub/steering knuckle to them, allowing them to measure and create. Another $500.

Let me know if you need more info.
Cheers, Richard
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ronbee on May 21, 2015, 02:09:29 AM

(http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL97/467659/23891866/398901889.jpg)


Hello,

I have a question about the hose between the fuelrail and the injectors. Originally they only use the ferrules to keep the hose on. I see you also used hoseclamps, i guess as an extra security measure to prevent the hose from popping off. I read somewhere on the internet that it's not recommended to use both the ferrules and the hoseclamps. Personally i think it's better the way you do it. What's you experience with this?

Thanks

Ronald
Title: Alfa Romeo 75 V6 3.0 12 valve
Post by: VeeSix on May 21, 2015, 12:08:13 PM
Is this the kit/look you decided on in the end Richard?
Are you going to add a Zender type boot spoiler as well as in attached photo?  :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on May 22, 2015, 10:12:26 AM
I have a question about the hose between the fuelrail and the injectors. Originally they only use the ferrules to keep the hose on. I see you also used hoseclamps, i guess as an extra security measure to prevent the hose from popping off. I read somewhere on the internet that it's not recommended to use both the ferrules and the hoseclamps. Personally i think it's better the way you do it. What's you experience with this?

Hey Ronald. I don't have much experience with ferrules (certainly not an engineering one), except to remove the factory ones. I decided to use clamps because - to me - they seem reliable. On the other hand, I don't know whether there's a factory 'trick' to ferrules, but to me they don't offer much security in keeping the hose in place, except to stop the very end of the hose from expanding. So I wasn't confident to just slip the new hose in position with a ferrule. Also, the factory style ferrules are very shallow compared with some pictures I've seen on the internet; I just can't see how they have much effect. I don't see how using a shallow ferrule plus clamp, together, would have a negative effect.

My fuel hose clamps are meant to be designed specifically for this application, apparently reducing possible damage to the hose (compared with normal worm drive clamps).

Is this the kit/look you decided on in the end Richard?
Are you going to add a Zender type boot spoiler as well as in attached photo?  :)

Similar kit (Evoluzione style), but without the Zender boot spoiler. I really dislike that boot spoiler!  :P
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Mick A on May 24, 2015, 02:35:42 AM
Hello,

The hose clamps won't do any harm, but they are not needed.
I have replaced these hoses on many cars over the years and have never seen one fail on the barb fitting, only the hoses splitting causing fuel leaks due to old age. 35mm is the correct length to cut the hoses from memory.

Cheers.

Mick
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Mick A on May 24, 2015, 02:36:28 AM
Hah, sorry I just realised that picture was taken in 2011. I'm a bit behind the times!

Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on May 25, 2015, 09:58:09 AM
The picture is old, but ronbee's question is new. So you're bang up to date!  ;D
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: V AR 164 on June 07, 2015, 11:28:16 PM
Omg,
I just spent 4 hours straight reading this whole thread, my eyes hurt lol.

Richard amazing job, your attention to detail is incredible and the pictures are fantastic!

Can't help but asking, when will the car be done?! Can't wait to see it all come together! 😃

Andrew.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on June 08, 2015, 09:18:04 AM
Thanks Andrew!

Unfortunately, no time soon. I don't think it will be this year. It will even be lucky to be finished in time for Spettacolo 2016. But 2017 is probably more realistic!

Mind you, I am happy to take my time, because you know how it is: once it's finished...I'll either become bored or need another project! And another project will mean more money!  ::)

I appreciate that you looked right through and enjoyed it.

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: V AR 164 on June 08, 2015, 11:23:30 AM
Haha no worries,

I love how in the beginning it was supposed to be done by the 2012 Spettacolo, then it was due to be done in 2015, now 2017 hahaha. (Suppose a good excuse to spend money and time in the garage 😃)

Good luck!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on June 09, 2015, 10:34:44 PM
Hi shiny car,
Did you do anything with the evo wheel flares ?
I'm put a  3lt in my car but know sure what ecu to use ?
at this time it has the 2.5 ecu .

cheers mate
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on June 10, 2015, 05:45:01 AM
If you search the alfabb you'll find a thread where someone was asking about the Ecuador differences between 2.5 and 3lt. The 3lt does run on the 2.5 ecu but I won't comment about how well or anything. Find the thread and have a read.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Evan Bottcher on June 10, 2015, 04:27:08 PM
..where someone was asking about the Ecuador differences between 2.5 and 3lt...

Damn you autocorrect!  8)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on June 10, 2015, 07:44:16 PM
Hahaha! Yep, early morning iPhone browsing before work.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on June 10, 2015, 08:45:24 PM
thank guys,
I will look for that thread on alfabb, All I need to know is the loom plug the same on the 3lt ecu as the 2.5lt ?

cheers  ::)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on June 11, 2015, 07:06:58 AM
Yep both plugs are the same. I used a 2.5 ecu for my megasquirt adaptor harness, so can answer that with first hand info.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on June 11, 2015, 06:46:46 PM
your bloody awesome jazig.k
thank
So both the looms are wire the same
I'm a happy boy

cheers mate
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Alfapride on April 25, 2016, 02:50:35 PM
Any update Shiny? This has to be one of the best 75 threads around!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on April 25, 2016, 08:47:41 PM
Hi Shiny,
I got tired of always scraping the exhaust on the bloody ground so I have taken
steps to correct that ?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on April 26, 2016, 10:06:59 AM
lol That's one way of fixing it!  :o

I'm getting close to restarting this project; beginning to become impatient, itching to get back into it, and ordering more and more parts. Hopefully I'll have more time...
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on June 10, 2016, 08:12:24 PM
I'm baaaaack!!   ;D

Over the past month, I've been squeezing in a little 'car time' around family, house, work, and leisure.

It's been nearly 18 months since my last update, and I've only started slowly. And I now realise working in little steps with little expectation, rather than do nothing at all, can be the way forward!

So what's left to do? Heaps, some of which are new plans hatched in the last year:

*pull engine: replace leaking 'rear main seal' and fit new 'front main seal' whilst I'm there; take off heads and arrange some minor porting from a specialist; replace stock pistons/sleeves with new higher-compression versions suited to the Potenziata motor (never done anything like this before, so could be interesting!)
*research and plan for aftermarket fuel injection; only worth it if I also upgrade cams (again) to aftermarket high performance street cams from Alfar7 (alfaBB member, Richard Jemison, RJR Racing)
*strip, clean, refit transaxle and rear suspension and upgrade rear brakes to ventilated discs
*suspension upgrade: when I can afford it, full kit from RS Racing including coilovers, ARBs
*fit front brakes; have wheels refurbished and buy tyres
*interior electrical upgrades: add voltage gauge, engine oil temp gauge, wideband AFR meter
*fit stereo
*have seats/door trims retrimmed
*refit interior; arrange tinted windows; arrange inspection/regas of aircon + upgrade condenser
*exterior: complete modifications/refurbishment of body kit; acquire Evoluzione-style bumpers; arrange professional respray; cut and polish

Nothing to it really! Errr, expect maybe another few years of time and $$$.  :lol:

Firstly, this is the new home for the car. A nice big garage, with workshop space at the back. It's still amazing how you fill such a space with so much stuff, and still be wanting!

(https://i.imgur.com/0R1OEep.jpg)

The first step was giving the car a wash! Not being drivable, it had to be hand-washed in situ, and not power-washed outside, but it wasn't really dirty, just quite dusty.

Pre-wash:

(https://i.imgur.com/JL7Ggrf.jpg)

Post-wash:

(https://i.imgur.com/eaolzAul.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/WEcef6z.jpg)

Where to start?! I could have started at any number of stages, but for something new, I thought I'd work on the boot. This means I can fit the battery into its new location, and ultimately have electrics back sooner rather than later, which will help ensure everything electrical is working as expected.

At once I encountered an issue: the springs didn't hold the boot lid open properly! Hence, a box at-hand proved helpful. Mind you, once I change to the carbon fibre lid, the existing springs should be fine without increasing tension.

(https://i.imgur.com/vc9goAP.jpg)

Having a look around, seeing what needs cleaning and attention. Second issue, which I discovered a little while back but paid no attention at the time: I think my fuel capacity is down! I don't think the tank is meant to be this shape:

(https://i.imgur.com/3HufIH5.jpg)

So another job will be to drain the tank, and replace it.

Various hoses and attachments in the boot, some to comply with emissions, which scavenge the fuel vapour from the engine back to the fuel tank...I think! Remember, there is a fuel vapour canister behind the front bumper, and hoses from there come to the boot.

(https://i.imgur.com/p3ZlmHR.jpg)

Peeling back the trim on the left-side of the boot, hid an aftermarket electric telescopic antenna. Functionally ok, but it didn't feature the original cool 'Alfa Romeo' trim piece. To be replaced.

(https://i.imgur.com/OTlmvSN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ci2hZpd.jpg)

To remove the boot lid, first the wiring for the number plate lights needed pulling-back. It threaded through the lid and hollow hinge arm.

(https://i.imgur.com/Z9m0Vjh.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4H65qNY.jpg)

The boot lid simply unbolted from the hinges, and the hinges unbolted from inside. I haven't decided whether to paint them black.

(https://i.imgur.com/pSo9nMX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/zvcEcTd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/zUrks7A.jpg)

Removed the rear light clusters. The ground wire is notoriously poor, and over time, people have had the wire overheat and show signs of burning/melting along the light cluster 'circuit’; and having the brake lights dim/pulse when the indicators flash on/off is pretty normal! The wire is relatively thing and long, terminating in the common ground point at the rear door sills; hence, the wire is about a metre long. Not surprisingly, this will be upgraded with a thicker and shorter wire.

With the lights, boot rubber, and number plate trim all removed, years of grime were revealed.

(https://i.imgur.com/2NebSDV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KB36BO0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7iMv5dw.jpg)

After the internal trims were removed, the boot wasn't too bad for its age! Plenty of cleaning was still required.

(https://i.imgur.com/i2UvFor.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/N6E7I79.jpg)

On either side were small box cavities, and I wondered why there was dirt inside. On the outside, pieces of self-adhesive foam covered openings but the seals were poor; there was also a missing grommet for another hole on the right side. Over the years, water spraying from the tyres made its way inside. The foam was removed, and the cavities washed out. I will fit proper grommets.

(https://i.imgur.com/NNX2iiL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/CQACKyy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/52UtaoQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7gwCn7w.jpg)

After some work, the boot scrubbed up alright. Some areas had paint/undercoat rubbed off exposing bare metal, and scant surface rust. These need sanding back and painting.

(https://i.imgur.com/QOp8jCZ.jpg)

One modification I had planned on, was fitting a boot solenoid. But alas, a previous owner had already fitted one! Strangely, it was no longer wired-up, but I will integrate with two features:
1. remote release using the aftermarket alarm key fob
2. change the standard boot badge to a funky press-button switch version from the 159 Sportwagon (series II/III); pressing the badge will unlock the boot, and it will be wired-up to only function when the alarm is disabled  8)

I bench tested the solenoid, and it still works fine (it's hardly rocket science: just an electrical coil creating a magnetic field when current passes through it). The issue with its fitment was the crude attachment: holes drilled into the panel for two self-tapping screws; I will improve on that! But first, removed for cleaning.

(https://i.imgur.com/L0VaWLQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ijCNrVW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/G8zrCnB.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/FzXmX03.jpg)

That's it for now. Whilst not a great deal of progress, it's a start, and I'll continue chipping away.

See you next month. :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: john m on June 20, 2016, 12:07:54 AM
Shiny's back!.......with a vengeance. Wow, checkout the new 4 car garage with storage space to boot. Love it, put up picture of your previous cramped man cave for comparison. Envious but inspired. Great work.
jm
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: john m on June 20, 2016, 12:30:10 AM
I just saw the damaged 75 fuel tank. Possible causes:
 loose heavy object hits tank under hard braking?
second hand replacement due to rust in original tank?
"drum crush", fuel cap on hot tank is replaced then tank is immediately cooled by some event? PO forgets to clip down the lid on ice filled esky, takes off for an spills iced water all over boot floor?
I'm out of ideas  ???
jm
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: jazig.k on June 22, 2016, 12:18:40 PM
WOO! Good to see the best thread make a return!

The fuel tank issue is likely blocked likes or vapor canister. Fuel pump sucks fuel out to feed the horses, no air get back in to replace the displaced fuel, tank caves in under vacuum. Happens to all sorts of cars I've seen online, but BMW's seem plagued with it to the point the vapor canister it pretty much a service replaced item. Once the tank caves in to a point, it's actually easier to draw air in through the blockage than collapse the tank further. Or the blockage frees up.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: ARQ164 Shane on June 22, 2016, 06:59:45 PM
Hi Shiny,
I fill a song coming on see if you can pick it.
Shiny back tell a friend, Shiny back Shiny back Shiny back
sounded better in my head LOL

Shane
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GeeTV on October 08, 2018, 11:52:38 AM
Daylight savings is a great time to spend hours of additional glorious sunshine under a car!!!!….. Any inspirational update here?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Craig_m67 on October 08, 2018, 02:21:13 PM
You should grab the sport wagon boot catch mechanism (or a sedan perhaps) when you grab the badge/button.  It’s a much nicer integrated unit that looks kinda similar (memory)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on October 12, 2018, 08:50:59 AM
I've got nothin'.  :'(

So...
- I haven't touched the car in a long time
- it's still there, and the intention is still there...so, one day
- I bought an old school Alpine CD headunit (CDA-7942R), that will integrate with the modern-day digital processor
- there's a BlueTooth unit so I can play music from my iPhone
- did I ever show the Evoluzione bodykit that I bought through here - unfitted of course  :P

@ Craig_m67: cheers, I'll have a look

:)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: easyrider on December 01, 2018, 10:44:22 AM
Good day all.

First sorry for my englisch, i am from the netherlands and i found this topic in google.
I am working on my Alfa 75 1.8 IE to restore it.
This topic is very useful for me and it has good tips.
I will follow this topic, keep up the good work.

My website about the restauration is www.alfaromeo75.nl
the restauration can be found at www.alfaromeo75.nl/restauratie-alfa-romeo-75-1-8/
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GeeTV on December 03, 2018, 01:18:59 PM
^ One of the best threads on the internet IMHO & and I don't even own a 75!.... In fact only started appreciating then recently [insert red face here].
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Dcal on February 18, 2019, 01:01:15 AM
Brilliant thread and a brilliant resource for people restoring these great cars.
Many thanks for putting so much detail into of your posts and your photography puts the rest of us to shame.

I found this thread while trying to get details of the underside of a 75 and I found it surprisingly difficult.
This thread is a lifesaver.

I'm doing up a twin spark LE at the moment and trying to keep it factory.
Unfortunately it's in a lot worse shape than yours and I'm certainly not the first person to work on it so a lot of bodges had to be removed and I've no idea of how many of the original details were e.g. pipe runs etc.

If anyone's interested my efforts are on the UK website "Mig welding forum"
https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/forum/threads/25-year-old-alfa-75-back-from-the-brink-hopefully.81348/

admin, feel free to delete the link if it's not allowed

Thanks again
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Citroënbender on February 18, 2019, 07:30:04 AM
Welcome, good to hear of another “youngtimer” project car.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Colin Edwards on February 18, 2019, 11:10:12 AM
Hi Dcal,

Welcome aboard!

The amount of damage done by salt to even the better protected cars never ceases to amaze and dismay me!

Great panel fabrication and repair work - well done!!  I hope my 75 never gets anywhere near what you are facing.

Colin
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on February 19, 2019, 08:57:57 PM
Glad to know it has been of help. Hearing this, it reassures me that it's worth the cost of having all the photos active.

I was recently at the crossroads as to whether A$300 per annum to continue having all the photos hosted was worth my while; these days, I could find a far cheaper website for hosting, but I have a couple thousand from this thread alone linked via url, so relocating them and updating every link would be an 'impossible task'.  ::)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: easyrider on February 20, 2019, 07:17:47 AM
This thread is really a great help for me.
And its good to read that you want to keep the photo's online.
Respect !!!!!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Hudders on January 24, 2020, 02:11:58 AM
Hi Shiny_car, I just wanted to say thanks so much for posting all those photos and tech info, I have not long bought a 75 and stumbled across this thread when googling about why my oil pressure gauge wasn't working and saw your post about replacing the sender unit, without your clear pictures and helpful info I would have struggled to identify where it was and how to go about removing it.

I've spent the last few days binge reading all 25 pages and doing my best to absorb as much info as I can, hopefully, one day you will get to put some more time into the car and we will get to see what will be one of the nicest 75s (in the voice of Jeremy Clarkson)..... "in the world"

So thanks again for all your hard work, anyone that has a 75 will certainly benefit from your work you have put in thus far, but don't fret about finishing it, Project Binky is over 5 years in the making and is showing little signs of finishing any time soon so you're in good company.


*For anyone wondering what is Project Binky, go check out Bad Obsession motorsport on YouTube and marvel at one heavily modded Mini.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: Hudders on January 24, 2020, 02:26:09 AM
Brilliant thread and a brilliant resource for people restoring these great cars.
Many thanks for putting so much detail into of your posts and your photography puts the rest of us to shame.

I found this thread while trying to get details of the underside of a 75 and I found it surprisingly difficult.
This thread is a lifesaver.

I'm doing up a twin spark LE at the moment and trying to keep it factory.
Unfortunately it's in a lot worse shape than yours and I'm certainly not the first person to work on it so a lot of bodges had to be removed and I've no idea of how many of the original details were e.g. pipe runs etc.

If anyone's interested my efforts are on the UK website "Mig welding forum"
https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/forum/threads/25-year-old-alfa-75-back-from-the-brink-hopefully.81348/

admin, feel free to delete the link if it's not allowed

Thanks again

As a fellow 75 owner from England, I will be following your build with interest, my 75 has rust, how much I as yet don't know but what I do know is it is certainly more than the tiny little scabs on Shiny's, not jealous about dry Australian cars at all, lol.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: arristoss on June 24, 2020, 02:16:58 AM
Hello to everyone. Can anyne tell me where i can find those strange switch bulb holders as shown in the page 22?
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 01, 2020, 05:57:29 AM
Hello to everyone. Can anyne tell me where i can find those strange switch bulb holders as shown in the page 22?

I doubt that you can buy new-unused original ones separately. Probably best to buy a used switch that includes the bulb holder.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on May 12, 2021, 08:22:56 PM
Hello again!

Wow, it's been 5 years since I posted any work on the car.  And unfortunately, during this time I have not made opportunity to continue.  But now, after years of wanting to, pondering, wishing I made time, what was 2020  :-X ...I have redeveloped the passion to recommence!

Because it's been 5 years, I've had to relearn everything I knew about 75's, by reading scores of forum topics (here, including readings this very topic (!), AlfaBB.com, elsewhere), rummaging through my old notes, creating a full inventory of all my parts, and refreshing the overall plan.  Though, I've learnt many new things along the way, and through research, I've decided to take the car to another level.  :o

The major difference to my initial dream - now 10 years ago when I bought the car! - is to go the full hog with the engine, and go with programmable fuel injection.  I'm yet to finalise any details; and work on this particular development may be a year away after I complete many other things, but my plan includes:
- programmable system, likely Autronic, if I purchase from Beninca Motors and utilise their skills and advice to make it happen
- this means ditch the airflow meter, and go with MAP (manifold absolute pressure) / IAT (intake air temperature) / CTS (coolant temp sensor) / crank pulley timing wheel and VR (variable reluctor) sensor / potentiometer TPS (throttle position sensor); I've already made some inroads with some of the gear
- COPs (coil on plug) ignition, and ditch the distributor and high tension wires
- yet to decide whether I want any, or combination of, wide band Lambda/O2 sensor and AFR (air fuel ratio) meter, EGT (exhaust gas temp), fuel pressure sensor, knock sensors; I don't believe any of these will add to the day-to-day performance once the car is properly tuned, but I might add a batch of gauges in the interior
- cams: I've ordered a set of RJ (Richard Jemison, who is a regular on AlfaBB.com forums) cams from the US, and decided on a high performance 'street' cam that optimises both torque and power for the road
- very minor head clean-up / porting, which I presume Beninca can perform
- largely a complete engine rebuild, with 10:1 CR (compression ratio) pistons (as fitted to the Potenziata)

Of course, that means an engine-out job, but I'm also motivated by needing to replace the leaking rear main seal.  So whilst I'm there...  ;)

For this return-post, I'm showing just some of the parts that I've bought, much of it very recently:

Though, firstly, this is the Evolutione bodykit that I bought from JOHN G (you in Oz at the moment mate?!).  From what I can tell and recall, it's the real deal, or at least it's a very high quality kit.  I never did ask where he got it from originally.  Compared with the flimsy stuff that I contemplated repairing and fitting (ie: the pieces that used to belong to jazig.k; I posted some pics of these on Oct 06 2013), this kit is very solid, and thus relatively heavy despite being fibreglass.  Some minor repairs are required for the front bumper 'slats' where it's cracked, but nothing major.

(https://i.imgur.com/1w59mUR.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Q9Q17UJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/bcmQxGv.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/EnYXs1a.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/s36Qs3X.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/cuHf7f8.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/M79PxOU.jpg)

BMC CDA (Carbon Dynamic Airbox) and aftermarket 75/SZ-specific parallel-flow aircon condenser.  Not everyone approves of custom air intakes and filters, but some seem better than others; because this setup is fully enclosed, I can create some form of cold air intake.

(https://i.imgur.com/uaNvWBk.jpg)

Now onto some more serious stuff, the full RSR (Ron Simons Racing) adjustable suspension setup.  From the decals, you can see it's built by Intrax; the Intrax catalogue lists its own large range of suspension setups for this car (including far more serious racing upgrades), but this is one of the sets designed/tuned to Ron Simons's specs.  Of the two kits he created, this is the adjustable-shock absorber version (for combined compression + rebound); having fitted various suspension parts to my cars over the years, I've always found any non-adjustable setup to be a little lacking, so I am happy to stump up the extra for some fine tuning ability.

The kits are available directly through RSR (I'm speculating/observing here, but I think Ron Simons was bought-out by another company but they still utilise the name): https://www.trackmodified.com/product/alfa-romeo/

However, I bought from OKP in Germany, who sell the kit, and held an Easter sale: https://www.okp.de/xtc2/

After researching what suspension options were available, I determined that the RSR kit had very favourable feedback from users, provides a very complete setup, and is readily available.  There's undoubtedly cheaper setups, and possibly 'better' setups (though that may be subjective), but this has always been my dream kit.  So here it is.

(https://i.imgur.com/VZlNMen.jpg)

Front coilover: this works with the original torsion bars (ie: doesn't replace them), and provides the adjustable shock absorber, and adds another spring for increased spring rate.  The thin red spring is a 'helper spring' to keep the main spring in position during full extension.  The threaded adjustable platform can alter tension, but mostly caters for whatever ride height you choose (ie: after setting the ride height via the torsion bars, you can then dial-in the coil spring tension).  The black, knurled knob near the bottom bracket twists, to make the compression/rebound adjustment.

(https://i.imgur.com/UQA1gJN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/wOOAM8q.jpg)

Rear springs sit on adjustable platforms to alter ride height.

(https://i.imgur.com/ptIzZOH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tssu6Mk.jpg)

Rear springs and shocks fit in the standard location points.  Shocks adjustable from the top.

(https://i.imgur.com/7gSlqJu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/X6T4mqV.jpg)

Front antiroll bar seems a crazy 30mm diameter!  Maybe it's rubber  :P except it's quite heavy, so I figure it's steel.  ;D Rose/rod-end/heim joints affix the ends to the lower suspension arms.  I will add rubber boots to cover the joints and keep them clean, and I have reinforcement plates that need welding to the chassis where the bar is bolted in place.

(https://i.imgur.com/52eSCFh.jpg)

Rear antiroll bar is 26mm diameter, and adjustable via the different attachment holes.  Rather fancy looking billet 'brackets' attach to the original De Dion mounts.

(https://i.imgur.com/5FmDiS5.jpg)

To round out the suspension, I have the Watt linkage parts (it's part of the package, but I bought it separately years ago when someone in the UK was selling it, unused), and De Dion spherical bearing.

(https://i.imgur.com/1NVQe25.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/1lhiIcO.jpg)

Next: these parts are from Chris Snowdon Racing (operated by Richard Melvin, an experienced UK campaigner).  Richard is great to deal with, and some of the racing parts on offer are quite serious but unfortunately go beyond what even I consider appropriate for a street car (yes, some of my parts might not have ADR certification, but I think an engineer might find they would meet the standard if required...maybe!).

https://alfettagtv6.co.uk/

(https://i.imgur.com/2F4QgOT.jpg)

For the front suspension, these are extended-pin upper ball joints, the sealed version (ie: feature the metal cap + rubber boot for protection).  Some of you may use knuckle-risers, which achieve the same outcome, to raise the end of the upper suspension arm into a more favourable position (for better camber during cornering).

(https://i.imgur.com/QXb3hA0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PqGCOim.jpg)

This is a reinforced clutch housing.  I probably don't need it, but hey, why not?!  If I achieve 250-260 hp (~190kW) from the engine I'll be happy, but that still probably wouldn't crack the original housing; not from driving on the street.  But this is something fancy!

(https://i.imgur.com/b7slJBX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3UAzef6.jpg)

And a few extra bits and pieces.  Here is a crankshaft pulley from a 164 featuring a '60-2' toothed timing wheel.  Apparently this can be pressed-off, then the 75's pulley needs some minor machining (to make slightly smaller diameter), before being pressed onto it.  It's seemingly impossible to find an original Potenziata pulley with the wheel, but one advantage of keeping my original pulley is that it's already balanced with the crankshaft and flywheel, so the toothed wheel shouldn't impact in that regard.  'Timing' is achieved with a VR (variable reluctor) sensor that is 'in the post', but I also have an original mounting bracket.  And because the timing wheel creates a bigger overall diameter pulley, this fouls against a standard water pump pulley; hence, the need to change to a Potenziata setup, which means a water pump shown here, that uses a separate smaller diameter bolt-on pulley...that's 'in the post'  :P .  I hope it fits!

(https://i.imgur.com/3uJRRoK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/XqG4CI8.jpg)

Lastly, an LSD upgrade kit, from Racing Diffs.  This will refurbish the factory diff, but with 4 friction plates instead of 2.  Nice, complete kit from the looks.

https://www.racingdiffs.com/products/alfa-romeo-lsd-clutch-kit

(https://i.imgur.com/iNRoT4q.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/iXcCqFA.jpg)

It's nice to be back - posting - and of course getting my hands dirty again.  I don't know whether I'll be posting every month like before, but I'll post when there's a worthwhile update on progress.

Thanks for looking...again.  :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: GTVeloce on May 13, 2021, 12:15:36 PM
Great to see you back posting and with such shiny parts! Serious part envy here.

Although, no electric water pump?  ::)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on May 14, 2021, 06:20:54 PM
Although, no electric water pump?  ::)

Hmmm *strokes chin*.  :P
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on June 08, 2021, 10:15:12 PM
I've pleasingly made time to work on the car, so there's been some good progress, and new parts continue to make their way from various parts of the world onto my shelves.

I spent my first session removing the transaxle from the vehicle.  That was quite straight forward.  Then spent the next group of days stripping it.  Some of that wasn't so straight forward!

Part 1

Firstly, the front wheels were chocked, and then the rear was raised onto axle stands.  Silver stands support the vehicle by the jack points; red stands are holding the De Dion tube for the moment, but not taking the weight of the whole vehicle.  I gave the floor underneath a good vacuum and clean.

(https://i.imgur.com/2yTiOKi.jpg)

To summarise transaxle removal:
1. disconnect the minor parts: antiroll bar, shock absorbers, brake line, speed sensor, reverse gear switch, clutch line, gearshift rod, prop shaft (I'd already done this), exhaust
*coffee time*
2. disconnect the major parts: front crossmember, Watt's linkage arms, gearbox rear connection
*have another coffee*

The antiroll bar and shock absorbers were unbolted.

(https://i.imgur.com/7ASquPp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OiI1MZ9.jpg)

Shock absorbers attach to the De Dion infront of the rear wheels.  They also limit suspension travel, as I discovered; the wheels will drop to the ground if unsupported!  Hence, the axle stands under the De Dion tube were important.

(https://i.imgur.com/YDq6ua4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/L407Als.jpg)

Rear brake hose and handbrake cable were detached.

(https://i.imgur.com/RojNxWb.jpg)

To prevent brake fluid from completely draining out, I wanted to leave the flexible hose connected to the hard line (pipe), and clamp the hose (which will be replaced, so no issues if it is deformed from the clamp).  However, to disconnect the far end from the T-junction, the whole hose needed to twist to unscrew, so the hose needed to be unfastened from the hard line first.  The connection between hard line and flexible hose was supported by a chassis bracket.  Handbrake cable nuts then loosened and removed from the caliper arms.

(https://i.imgur.com/bDReJiy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rA4mcGD.jpg)

On the left side of the gearbox, the speed sensor was removed, and reverse-gear switch unscrewed.  A while ago I temporarily loosened the speed sensor and did not refit it completely, hence oil has seeped out.  The oil stains are not from leaks elsewhere!  I tucked the sensor and switch over the handbrake cable, out of the way.

(https://i.imgur.com/yngQS8T.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/bV9lemO.jpg)

Then on the right side, the hose was removed from the clutch slave cylinder.  Like the brakes, the hose needed disconnection from the hard line first, then unscrewing from the cylinder.

(https://i.imgur.com/IW7809y.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9hOYq5G.jpg)

At the front, the gearshift rod was detached from the gearbox linkage.  The rod was cleaned and painted previously, which is why it looks clean.  Back then the roll pin had been partially reinserted (hence it's sticking out of the rod, in the photo); I couldn't pull it out easily, so had to punch it right through, and out the other side.  Prop shaft previously removed (years ago).

(https://i.imgur.com/LEvjs3G.jpg)

Last minor task, to disconnect the exhaust centre section from the rear muffler.  After loosening the clamp, the slip joint seemed seized.  The centre section is to be replaced, so I started attacking it with a reciprocal saw, only for the joint to fall apart before I'd finished!

(https://i.imgur.com/f6szegc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/solka2l.jpg)

I kept a couple pallets to hold and manoeuvre the transaxle.  I initially secured swivel wheels to the larger pallet, but then realised the smaller one was more suitable because it could fit between the car wheels.

(https://i.imgur.com/IanjlRk.jpg)

To fit the pallet under the car, and the trolley jack beside it, I swapped-out the red axle stands supporting the De Dion tube for blocks of wood under the wheels.

(https://i.imgur.com/Tyr9oOL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ughzcro.jpg)

The six bolts holding the front crossmember were removed (2 short, 4 long), and then lowered onto the pallet.

(https://i.imgur.com/KiL0bM3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/D2mVfzT.jpg)

The Watt's Linkage arms were unbolted from the chassis.

(https://i.imgur.com/O2oEtjo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5LF07wW.jpg)

The last disconnection point was the gearbox rear mount.  The gearbox was obviously heavy, so required support from underneath (with blocks of wood) to remove the bolt easily, before gently lowering onto the pallet.  I removed the rear muffler to make the job easier.

(https://i.imgur.com/YQ0x94e.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/aYtKb6p.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/99p97VW.jpg)

With the wheels removed, the whole transaxle could be rolled out. Yeh!  The springs were also wiggled out from their positions without difficulty.

(https://i.imgur.com/0xPlsSc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ll4Ob0A.jpg)

/Part 1
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on June 08, 2021, 10:25:01 PM
Part 2

The transaxle was ‘parked’ to one side in my garage until my next session, to dismantle it into sections.

(https://i.imgur.com/T7V8iH5.jpg)

Off came the Watt’s Linkage from the centre pin.  Bit of surface rust on the pin.

(https://i.imgur.com/zXoCi6Y.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ykgmdE2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ZticYLA.jpg)

The wheel shaft was secured by a large nut, covered by a lock nut secured by a split pin.  After straightening the arms, the pin did not slip or punch out easily, hence quicker to cut the arms off first.  The lock nut simply fitted loosely over the main nut.

(https://i.imgur.com/5EQHT88.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/CBvsKuQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/tKxOjLF.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GgtDDjc.jpg)

Temporarily refitting the wheels made it easier to ‘break’ the axle shaft bolts loose.  The axles then slipped out of position.

(https://i.imgur.com/0gId6fl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3VCcffT.jpg)

The inboard rear brake discs were bolted to the diff shafts via a spacer.  To break these bolts loose, I engaged the ‘handbrake’ to hold the discs stationary, using a turnbuckle and shackle I had lying around.

(https://i.imgur.com/p0gfPlW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0BUJKmy.jpg)

Pads were removed, allowing the discs to drop out.  Keep hold of the pad anti rattle clip when taking out a retaining pin, or else it will spring out…and hit you in the face (don’t ask how I know).

(https://i.imgur.com/5m0TAf4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mVyEVFF.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/QSg1o1q.jpg)

Brake fluid hard lines were removed.  The T-piece bolted to the gearbox, and a bracket held the righthand pipe.

(https://i.imgur.com/RDejMBD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0EnK1ac.jpg)

Brake calipers removed from their studs.  Some surface rust on the left studs.

(https://i.imgur.com/QwGtCMq.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/LbnOJTA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/88aIrr7.jpg)

Clutch slave cylinder slotted through a hole, and held by circlips either side.

The rubber boot was secured by cable ties.  It appeared to be cut along the inside, presumably by a ‘lazy’ mechanic who didn’t want to remove the slave cylinder to slide the boot into position intact.

(https://i.imgur.com/X0RxaTV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Kn6BmTz.jpg)

Unsurprisingly, the push rod and clutch fork were grubbier than they could have been.

(https://i.imgur.com/lqJGfQs.jpg)

Slave and clutch fork removed.

(https://i.imgur.com/T9exgUb.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/bWuuTeg.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/UqnHVFU.jpg)

These were the chunky metal spacers that fit between the crossmember and chassis.  Their thickness on the 75 is apparently more than the GTV or Alfetta sedan.

(https://i.imgur.com/t2tHBy2.jpg)

Isostatic gearshift linkage!  Some people loathe it because the shift quality suffers when the components wear.  It does seem overly complex.  I will completely overhaul it with new aftermarket parts.  Schematic might add clarity:

(https://i.imgur.com/jlfChrs.jpg)

Moving the gearstick fore and aft (blue arrow; eg: changing from 1st to 2nd gear) naturally moves the gearbox shift rod in and out.  Moving the gearstick side to side (eg: across from 1st/2nd to 3rd/4th row) rotates the shift rod via the Isostatic linkage (red arrows). 

(https://i.imgur.com/Slwc6my.jpg)

The ‘engagement lever’ (#5 in schematic) pivots at this neat little rod end bearing.

(https://i.imgur.com/DUY40ZY.jpg)

The linkage bolted to this arm on the end of the shift rod.  I found a fair amount of (abnormal) free-play between the arm and rod.  A roll pin secured the arm in position.

(https://i.imgur.com/c491Ylu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NYD9Yxa.jpg)

Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on June 08, 2021, 10:26:49 PM
A separate bracket, bolted to the left side gearbox mount, held the Isostatic linkage.  The M6 bolt passed through the mount (red arrow) then a spacer and out the other side of the bracket.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZReIWlL.jpg)

Gearbox mounts removed, now freeing the gearbox from the suspension completely.

(https://i.imgur.com/WdsH1ji.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SDxJvMM.jpg)

Around the back again: I temporarily refitted the wheel to hold the hub still, to remove the main nut.  I could not break the nut free with the wrench I had (torqued to 265-324 Nm when fitted), so out came the air impact wrench.  Tightness and rust meant it still took some effort, and penetrating oil, to be removed.

The wheel shaft was easily pushed out with a whack from a hammer.

(https://i.imgur.com/YGgxFSc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7CnjbeV.jpg)

But, oh, to remove the hub!!  I’d read about this job being one of the most difficult on the whole car, because parts seize together.  I didn’t anticipate this to be such an issue on an Australian car, compared with a vehicle in the UK driven on salted roads.

The common problem is the hub (green arrows) seizing to the bearing (red arrows).  The problem is more difficult because of the factory ‘dust shield’ fitted to the hub, which prevents tools from being used in that area (eg: to slot a bearing remover into the gap, or attach the claws of a gear puller around the De Dion).

(https://i.imgur.com/f9COYZD.jpg)

The whole De Dion and hub don’t fit at the correct angle in a standard hydraulic press (I tried!).  I also tried a ‘big hammer’ to punch it out (with thanks to my patient wife, who held the De Dion upright without dropping it); fail.  Then I refitted it to the axles and gearbox to brace the wheel shaft, but there was too much slack in the CV joints to brace the shaft adequately. FAIL.

I was a little disheartened.  I didn’t really need to pull this section apart because the bearings felt quite smooth.  But having it in pieces would make cleaning and painting easier.  After using the big hammer, I must have damaged the bearing a little, because it was now rough and a bit sloppy.  So then I was forced to finish the job.

Look at the factory tool to brace the back of the wheel shaft!  I don't have one of these in my toolbox.  ::)
(Images courtesy of: http://www.dep-o.co.uk/features/replacing-alfetta-rear-wheel-bearing/)

(https://i.imgur.com/6cdd5iu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/fy1hDHJ.jpg)

The wheel shaft requires ‘fixing’ in position to use tools to pull the hub out.  I did more research, and saw many home made tools and mash-up tools to replicate the factory version.  Hoping not to spend more $$ on more equipment, I chanced upon a technique using the opposite wheel shaft as a brace.  Voila, it worked!

With the shaft braced, I could use a conventional gear puller to grasp the hub, and push against the end of the shaft.  Together with lots more penetrating oil sprayed onto the bearing/hub, a big hammer intermittently whacking the tip of the gear puller, and poking my tongue in a south easterly direction (!), the hub went TWANG and it shifted!  I gradually ‘wound’ it out, twang by twang.

(https://i.imgur.com/EEta6Of.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0cTm50z.jpg)

The rear wheel bearing is a ‘double row’ bearing (two bearings side-by-side in one housing).  The wheel hub was successfully pulled from the inside bearing, but the outside half remained stuck to the hub.  I’d seen many photos of the same situation.  Removing the outer half is a job for the future, but shouldn’t be too bad.

(https://i.imgur.com/7ro5rPD.jpg)

The remaining parts of the bearing were the outer race and inside bearing.  And clumps of old grease; bearing probably due for replacement anyway.

(https://i.imgur.com/xziLSaL.jpg)

Surely the left hub would be easy enough, having won the battle on the right.  No!  The rusty discolouration was perhaps a clue that it was more seized.  Aside from penetrating oil, this one required fire!  Out came the propane torch.  I focused on heating the bearing, theoretically causing it to expand and loosen from the hub; but of course, heating the hub was unavoidable.

The twang when the hub first shifted was again startling!

(https://i.imgur.com/TuGynaw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/xzr1E98.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/BKKvpxE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dxytGqC.jpg)

The bearings were secured in the De Dion by a thin retaining ‘nut’ (red arrows).  This was revealed after cleaning away the grime.  The nut will also be replaced, thus suitable to cut out.  After carefully cutting through a couple places, a segment was bent up, and then easily pulled out.

(https://i.imgur.com/6pJd7fI.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/EB40mOw.jpg)

Removing the remnants of the bearings was not difficult, with tools I already had.  These included a set of drifts of various diameters (eBay: sold as Bearing Seal Drive Tool Kit), a large ball joint remover (glorified G-clamp, with its own set of drifts), and gear puller.

Starting with the ball joint remover and 64mm diameter drift, removal was initiated.  Once broken free, I used the puller to…err, push.  The claws had to be positioned out of the way.  Hmm, this step felt like it was giving birth to a bearing!  Puuuushhh, harder!  Here it comes!  Pop.

(https://i.imgur.com/LoiuA8Y.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/1epCv7k.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/78ZeW93.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/E1KZwHz.jpg)

Right then left sides completed.

(https://i.imgur.com/eA9KPqM.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5IrcAhP.jpg)

Lastly, unbolted the front of the De Dion triangle from the crossmember.  I manoeuvred the triangle from under the gearbox and flipped it over, to access the bolt head.

(https://i.imgur.com/VA7s1AQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/B1wviP0.jpg)

This came apart easily.  The bush looked in good shape, but will be replaced by a spherical bearing.

The silver ‘washer’ was the original spacer.  However, sandwiched between the spacer and bush, I found what looked like an exhaust hanger.  This isn’t a standard inclusion according to the Workshop Manual and ePer parts list!  I’m guessing it was fitted either as a dust seal or to reduce some clunking noise.

(https://i.imgur.com/5vUMO7q.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4HCoG54.jpg)

There were two spacer rings, above and below the bush, to help hold it in position.

(https://i.imgur.com/glABATc.jpg)

All done for now - tucked away again. Everything is ready to be cleaned, repainted, replaced, and/or fixed.  I’ll clean the outside of the gearbox, then access the clutch, and crack open the ‘box to change some internal parts including the synchros.

(https://i.imgur.com/hVIGHzw.jpg)

/Part 2
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on June 08, 2021, 10:28:44 PM
Part 3

Here’s a selection of more replacement parts that have arrived.  Anything and everything that can potentially be upgraded, or replaced, has been researched, considered, and sourced accordingly.  Parts have come from overseas, including the US, UK, Germany, and Italy.

CSC stainless centre exhaust section.  I thought CSC Marmitte had closed shop permanently; I read they have filed for bankruptcy three times in the past, probably four.  EB Spares supplied this, so I presume they are back in business!

(https://i.imgur.com/X4MYF7l.jpg)

This little kit from AHM, replaces the distributor with a mini shaft, bearing, and cap.

https://www.ahmotorsports.co.uk/

(https://i.imgur.com/CAXhgaZ.jpg)

The water pump I originally purchased via eBay, perhaps unsurprisingly, did not fit the Potenziata pulley I bought separately.  Many internet stories about difficulty finding a water pump with the correct (small) size mounting plate that suits.  The pump I received - despite being advertised as suitable - was really a 164 pump, with larger flange.  One day I might find the right pump!

(https://i.imgur.com/bhq03cu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/m86qVVI.jpg)

Instead, EB Spares sell this replica SZ/RZ water pump that should work.  The pulley on either setup is meant to clear the trigger wheel fitted to the crank pulley on Motronic engines, whereas the L-Jet V6 pulley dose not.  So hopefully this works!

(https://i.imgur.com/mw0RQzU.jpg)

Brise make smaller (lighter and more powerful) starter motors that are a bolt-on replacement.  This is necessary (perhaps not essential) with CSC exhaust headers fitted, which reduce the clearance with the original starter.

https://brise.co.uk/

(https://i.imgur.com/ES5vkOG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/eEhoA4n.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/hPxz2oe.jpg)

Rear brake caliper spacer kit, modifies the calipers to accept ventilated discs.  Several vendors offer similar.  This kit is from CSR (Chris Snowden Racing), where I also purchased the front extended-pin upper ball joints and reinforced clutch housing, that I posted about last time.  The kit includes the spacers, O-ring seals, longer bolts, and longer pins.

(https://i.imgur.com/l6fVdDu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/C0J0F7A.jpg)

This kit might interest some of you.  I saw it on a facebook post!  Alfonso Ciardullo, from the US, makes a mounting plate to hold a bearing for a longer cam belt that provides far more wrap around the pulley.  The kit includes all required parts, and is a direct bolt-on (except requires a small amount of the head to be ground flat near one bolt hole); the belt is a Toyota Cressida part, and bearing from a Lexus.  It was US$450 + shipping.  He has used and refined the setup in his race cars over many years, apparently without any issues.

(https://i.imgur.com/808WtsX.jpg)

One of Alfonso’s FB photos:

(https://i.imgur.com/DqgLLzk.jpg)

Message me if interested in contacting him.

/Part 3

That’s it for this month.  Thanks for looking!
Richard
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: alfagtv85 on June 09, 2021, 09:52:05 AM
Shiny

I have been following your post from the beginning and am really glad that you are back and working on the 75, your attention to detail is incredible and the pictures are both fantastic and informative, especially to someone who is not mechanically talented.

I use the information that you provide to work on my 75, although not to the extent that you do.

I love what you do, keep it going!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 08, 2021, 11:38:38 PM
@ alfagtv85: thanks mate!  I'm glad it's of help, and hopefully demonstrate that it isn't too hard to do all these things.  I'm not trained in mechanics or engineering, just a backyard enthusiast, so if I can do it, so can others.

Part 1

Hello again!

Carrying-on from last month, I removed the bush from the De Dion.  I flattened the stakes back, using a hammer and punch; enough to free the metal retainer ring.  Then supported the whole triangle under my hydraulic press, and pushed the old bush out using a 54mm diameter drift.  The workshop manual refers to upper and lower retaining rings, but my car only had one.

(https://i.imgur.com/nuwqfHc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OJz5tBf.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lsoNL0K.jpg)

De Dion then put aside for future cleaning and painting.

Next, I cleaned most of the gearbox and split it open (something I'd never done before, so kinda fun).  It was amazing how clean some of the parts were underneath all the grime.

I drained any remaining oil from the 'box, by removing the drain plug and tilting on its side, emptying into an old container.  Obviously the oil will still drain without tilting (ie: when the gearbox is still on the car).

(https://i.imgur.com/w0x30ZH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JXdZQVe.jpg)

The 'box was quite filthy on the outside; a mix of oil, dirt, and debris:

(https://i.imgur.com/CKX03NQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9MYQbrP.jpg)

I used an old wire brush to remove the loose crud initially:

(https://i.imgur.com/b4SAqJo.jpg)

The differential end was quite oily, so I resorted to degreaser and a high pressure hose.  Before the degrease:

(https://i.imgur.com/jNejrRZ.jpg)

After the degrease, and drying, I attacked the surface with a combination of stainless steel wire brushes, including a coarse brush on a drill, and Dremel attachments, combined with Wax & Grease Remover and rags:

(https://i.imgur.com/7NAWFrt.jpg)

Bottom half mostly done, top half still to do:

(https://i.imgur.com/acSUAjL.jpg)

After what I guess as about 8 hours of cleaning across a few days, I was very happy with the result.  The diff housing was the most time-consuming.  I will still do a final wipe-down after the box is stripped and reassembled, before refitting to the car.  I've read and seen pics of other peoples' housings after bead/particulate blasting and/or chemical cleaning, which can look fantastic, but I still really like the finish I've achieved.

(https://i.imgur.com/5BZW2LO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/zB6bTH7.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3tDGNEW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/o1gsY6W.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5NzH1j5.jpg)

On the underside was what appeared to be a serial number.  And on the side was probably the month of manufacture: '4 dots' in the '8' quadrant which I presume means April 1988.

(https://i.imgur.com/JbXVsX6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/A57yLyy.jpg)

Under all the grime, I found the gearbox ventilation tube.  This equilibrates pressure inside the 'box when it heats and cools; excessive internal air pressure can cause oil leaks past the seals.  No idea if mine was effective, because it appeared so clogged on the outside.  Spot it here in one of my previous pics:

(https://i.imgur.com/HvGABDJ.jpg)

And here after cleaning the exterior of the gearbox:

(https://i.imgur.com/wnXKmrJ.jpg)

From research, I determined it was press-fitted into the casing.  So I used an old, cheap quality 'ball joint separator' to drive as a wedge (RED arrow) between two spanners, to push the vent up and off.

(https://i.imgur.com/86tPvNm.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Csm0AO9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DO7wZQy.jpg)

Inside the vent was material like wire wool, sandwiched between two wire mesh openings.  I soaked it in wax & grease remover, then blew compressed air in both directions.

(https://i.imgur.com/5xfVlFj.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2xX8urV.jpg)

Cleaned and functional again!  Then put aside to refit later.

(https://i.imgur.com/NRLfLov.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NciHHve.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 08, 2021, 11:41:44 PM
Part 2

Back around the clutch end of the gearbox: I loosened the double-nuts with my air impact wrench, and checked the prop shaft fork would be easy to remove using a puller (it wasn't seized).  Four bolts secured the clutch housing to the gearbox, and it was easily separated.

(https://i.imgur.com/ceQPbji.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/epyJvER.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/BUasdGy.jpg)

With the clutch removed, revealed was the:
- hollow thrust bearing support tube (the clutch thrust bearing slides along the tube (RED arrow) to engage/disengage the clutch; the main gear shaft rotates inside the tube and connects to the clutch)
- clutch fork pivot bolt, also shown (second pic) through the opening where the fork passed into the clutch housing

(https://i.imgur.com/yKhsxKn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Gpim7in.jpg)

Thrust bearing support tube removed:

(https://i.imgur.com/kQxEltr.jpg)

Two oil seals to be replaced later:
- main input shaft
- shift rod

(https://i.imgur.com/odsokgu.jpg)

Back to the other end, for the diff: cut-outs in the diff axles provided access to four Allen head bolts each side, securing the axle flanges to the casing.  The flanges were sealed to the casing, though mine were easy enough to remove; there were thin recessed gaps behind each bolt 'ear', where a cold chisel could be GENTLY tapped, to separate the parts.

(https://i.imgur.com/7bfwHiw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/E1ULPiT.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/UMdlrHS.jpg)

Left and right diff axles: note their different lengths.  Later, I will dismantle the axles and flanges to change the oil seals.

(https://i.imgur.com/vtborXz.jpg)

12 bolts secured the diff cover to the main casing.  Easy to remove; I found no sealant here, but I will apply some on reassembly.  Note the 'oil level' mark: the clean area had been bathed in gearbox oil, and the darker area was stained by 'dirty' splashed oil (? containing metallic wear particles from gears, synchros, etc).

(https://i.imgur.com/iJJO21k.jpg)

The diff carrier (ie: differential housed inside) with 39-tooth ring gear and bearings, just slipped out once axles removed.

(https://i.imgur.com/TkLWv8I.jpg)

Now viewed inside the casing were the:
- 11-tooth pinion gear (this equates to a 39/11 = 3.55 diff ratio; later Potenziata/QV cars have a shorter (41/11) 3.73 ratio, and 4 cylinder cars have an even shorter (41/10) 4.10 ratio)
- end of the main gear shaft and its bearing
- ends of the gear selection shift rods that slide in/out
- oil drain plug that I removed for the photo

(https://i.imgur.com/cmddoaS.jpg)

To split open the gearbox, the bolts and nuts were removed.  Some were relatively flush with the casing, preventing the head of a ratchet-drive fitting directly into position, so a universal joint was handy.  The clutch slave cylinder mounting bracket was removed with three of the bolts.

(https://i.imgur.com/tYnoqbP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3LcMcuH.jpg)

The gearbox casings were sealed together, and required a few whacks from a mallet via some hardwood timber offcuts (RED arrow).  The workshop manual refers to three main sections for the gearbox:
1. clutch-speed casing (the forward section housing the clutch and some of the gears
2. intermediate flange (thin mid section that supports the gear shafts and shift rods)
3. diff-speed casing (the rear section housing the differential and some of the gears)

(https://i.imgur.com/XAsxM5Y.jpg)

The mallet successfully split the gearbox into the three sections.  Here, I started by removing the clutch-speed casing.  In doing so, the reverse 'idler' gear slipped off its short support shaft (expected).

(https://i.imgur.com/q6daoWT.jpg)

There were only two major gear shafts:
1. main input shaft (rotates in direction of engine crankshaft (RED arrow))
2. pinion shaft (rotates in opposite direction (RED arrow))

Connection of the two shafts via the (1st to 5th) speed gears generates forward motion of the car, so naturally there must be the additional reverse 'idler' gear between the two shafts when Reverse is selected, so that the pinion shaft rotates in the SAME direction as the main shaft, propelling the car backwards.

(https://i.imgur.com/sQhV8fe.jpg)

The shift rod had a metal 'tooth' that engaged separately with three internal shift rods.  In the photo, it's sitting in N (neutral).  When moving the gearstick (in the cabin) to select 1st or 2nd gear, the tooth rotates up and engages with the upper shift rod, and slides forwards or backwards to select each gear.  When selecting 3rd or 4th gear, the tooth springs to the central N position and engages the middle shift rod, sliding forwards and backwards to select each gear.  Rotating down engages the lower shift rod, to select 5th or Reverse.

There was a metal 'safety knob' embedded in the main shift rod.  This engages with a spring loaded locking mechanism (called the 'interlock plunger') mounted on the casing that prevents shifting from 5th directly into R.

(https://i.imgur.com/xsps9M7.jpg)

The shift rod spring provides the main force that keeps the gearstick in the 3rd-N-4th shift plane.

(https://i.imgur.com/IMK9txv.jpg)

Forward of the intermediate flange, and in the clutch-speed casing, were the 5th and R gears.  The shift fork had swung down, out of normal position.  Ordinarily, it would engage with the 5th gear outer synchro sleeve (darker BLUE arrow), and R idler gear (LIGHT BLUE arrow).

Note that the R gears are 'straight cut'.  Whilst providing stronger engagement (greater contact area between teeth) and cheaper to construct, straight cut gears generate a high pitch whine, which is the noise you hear from a car travelling in reverse at speed.

The shift fork moves backwards to engage 5th gear.

(https://i.imgur.com/Zmlcee1.jpg)

Here, I supported the shift fork with a piece of wood.  The R idler gear spins on a short support shaft fitted in the clutch-speed casing, and is moved forwards (RED arrow) to engage R.

Note the splined end of the pinion shaft, which triggers the speedo (reluctor) sensor.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZzndmEW.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 08, 2021, 11:43:43 PM
Part 3

There were remnants of blue sealant on the mating surfaces of the gearbox sections.

(https://i.imgur.com/TwpVhTE.jpg)

This was the 'speed' (gear) side of the clutch-speed casing.  The other (clutch) side was shown before (with clutch fork pivot bolt and thrust bearing support tube).  It features the:
- interlock plunger (that engages with the shift rod 'safety knob' to prevent accidental shifting into R)
- hole with bearing and oil seal for the main shaft to pass through
- bush to support the end of the pinion shaft, through to a cavity for the splined speedo sensor trigger
- short support shaft that holds the R idler gear (in position here)

(https://i.imgur.com/vrWlvf2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4wTAnej.jpg)

I removed the interlock plunger for dismantling and cleaning.  It features a spring-loaded pawl.  The baseplate was orientated by a small roll pin; the plate was gently separated off the pin with a flat blade screwdriver.

(https://i.imgur.com/hvnT8cw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/kvRjPJV.jpg)

I tried to simulate the workings of the interlock plunger to see how it prevents selecting R gear.  Whilst it blocks the movement of the main shift rod via the safety knob when moving directly from 5th to R, I have not determined the function of the spring loaded pawl, and why it was not simply a 'solid block'.  I am guessing that if an attempt was made to select R from any other gear, the idler gear, shift fork, and rods 'kick back' from the spinning gears (partly due to lack of synchro), and the safety knob springs past the pawl and becomes locked out from another attempt.  Anyone know for certain?

(https://i.imgur.com/6NA2TfO.jpg)

The intermediate flange was separated from the diff-speed casing.  1st to 5th gears are helical cut, which are comparatively silent in operation.  Two more shift forks to engage 1st-2nd and 3rd-4th gears.

Note the ends of the shift rods were bright silver.  The ends fit into the diff casing and slide in/out which keeps them polished (the rods were viewed in a previous photo, above, when diff was removed)

(https://i.imgur.com/oWjN1qd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/08Ech1c.jpg)

The external end of the main shift rod, that connects to the isostatic linkage, showed wear.  The L-shaped lever that fitted over the end must have 'rocked' back and forth; this would occur during 20+ years of forceful or 'crunched' gearshifts, causing the rod to baulk and repeatedly bounce against the linkage.  To optimise the shift quality, I have a replacement rod.

(https://i.imgur.com/skEilUH.jpg)

The L-shaped lever was refitted (as recommended in workshop manual) for easier grip, and the rod rotated and removed from the flange.

(https://i.imgur.com/EfUBC55.jpg)

The internal shift rods were held firmly by spring loaded 'detent balls'.  Each rod had a ball (like a ball bearing) pressing into its side; these were secured by 'container' bolts that featured an unusual 10mm square head.  Why do engineers have to make it hard!!  Two of the bolts were easily removed, but the head of the middle bolt was recessed and difficult to access; it was also very tight, and I inadvertently damaged the head trying to remove it.

Rather than completely strip the head, I left it in place, and have ordered a suitable 10mm 4-point socket piece.  The rod was still removable, pulling out against the resistance of the detent ball.

(https://i.imgur.com/yBoyrHq.jpg)

The schematic shows the position of the container bolts (#1, called a 'plug' here) directing the detent balls (#3) against the rods.  Note the 'interlock plungers', which are small sausage-shaped rods, that also interact with the shift rods.  The tips of the interlock plungers drop in/out of detents (RED arrows) in the shift rods, functioning as a locking mechanism; a shift rod can only slide if the plunger can be pushed out from the detent into the detent on an adjacent shift rod.  If the adjacent rod's detent is not aligned, the plunger is blocked and keeps the shift rod locked against sliding.  This safety mechanism prevents more than one shift rod moving at any one time so that you can't accidentally engage more than one gear at a time.

(https://i.imgur.com/L31PZOl.gif)

(https://i.imgur.com/ELrX7DH.jpg)

The container bolts were hollow, for the thrust spring that pushes the detent ball.

(https://i.imgur.com/x8OLXQc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/R2fsijf.jpg)

With shift rods removed, I sat the intermediate flange and gears on my small work stand (which has an adjustable opening for the underside gears to pass).  Note the inscribed '+3' (0.03mm) on the pinion, which was a factory measurement to help calculate and set the alignment of the pinion gear (teeth), via a shim, with the diff ring gear (teeth); I will inspect the shim when I disassemble the pinion shaft.  Virtually no-one has the requisite factory tools to measure the alignment, though I won't require changing anything unless the shim shows wear.  I don't know what the inscribed 'A' or 'NLF' meant.

(https://i.imgur.com/yyhfgno.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/lOoqvWw.jpg)

The workshop manual requests the 'stack height' of the gears be measured before and after disassembly to ensure everything is returned to original specification.  As long as I do the work carefully (ie: seat all the pieces properly) there should be no issue, however, as an exercise in measurement I approximated the height using a basic stand and gauge, and also 'eyed' it using a ruler!  0.03mm is the accepted tolerance (pre vs post disassembly); unfortunately, the positioning of my stand for the gauge is probably not 100% reproducible, so a difference of 0.03mm is quite likely  ::) .

(https://i.imgur.com/qAcX7mp.jpg)

To loosen/remove nuts on each shaft, the workshop manual asked for 2nd and 4th gears to be engaged by sliding the outer synchro sleeves.  Engaging two gears at once (recall that this would be impossible if the shift rods and interlock plungers were in position) locks the shafts together, making it easier to break the nuts free.

Flipping the gearset over revealed the 36mm pinion shaft nut and 30mm main shaft nut.  It's possible to reach the former nut with a very deep socket piece (that I've ordered), but the latter requires a suitable 'crows foot' socket piece (that I've also ordered!).  There are factory tools for the job, but generic items are suitable, so my pile of new tools continues to rise!

Further disassembly will have to wait until I have the right tools.

(https://i.imgur.com/O0Kkr80.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/EBh4K07.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IPRmEHj.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 08, 2021, 11:46:22 PM
Part 4

Meanwhile, I put more time into cleaning.  The blue sealant was evidence of the gearbox previously being opened.  I cleaned the intermediate flange of any sealant and oil (before and after shots).

I used some cheap microfibre cloths (eBay bulk buy), and plastic trim removing tool as a scraper, and wax & grease remover.

(https://i.imgur.com/ycCsp3d.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rPfcnVN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SJ3lMYK.jpg)

Flip and repeat:

(https://i.imgur.com/j3fMAYZ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nBEwQp3.jpg)

Then onto the clutch-speed casing, gear-side:

(https://i.imgur.com/hJKZyVS.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0vUCZHJ.jpg)

Clutch side:

(https://i.imgur.com/Odik6dD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/AqEym9m.jpg)

Remnants of the factory sealant (brown) were hard to remove, so mostly left.  That sealant was presumably quite runny when applied, and dried solid.

(https://i.imgur.com/Hg5zmyz.jpg)

Photos of closer inspection of the gearset (final inspection will occur when disassembled).  The car has travelled approximately 135,000 kilometres, so one would expect wear on the sharp edges of the 'dog gears', outer synchro sleeves, and wear on the inner synchro rings.  2nd gear is notorious for wearing the most with subsequent grinding on gearshifts.  However, the dog gear teeth appeared quite new!  I figure it was replaced recently.

The dog gears are a separate ring of teeth, pressed onto the speed gear.  Whilst the dog gear can be removed and replaced, they are not available separately as a spare part; they come attached to a gear.  However, all dog gears (five in transaxle gearboxes) are the same, so one can either purchase any NOS (New Old Stock) complete gear, or swap a good used dog gear for a worn one.  In particular, 5th gear is used relatively less than 2nd gear, so many people swap a worn 2nd gear dog with a 5th gear one from within the same 'box, or from another gearbox.

(https://i.imgur.com/YW7wgFc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/EorffGX.jpg)

One thing I've learnt from this project, is how the gearbox works - I'll try to explain!  Pictured, are 1st to 4th gears; 5th is similar.  All the gears on the main shaft (top of picture) are 'fixed', and rotate together.  All the gears on the pinion shaft are loose, and free to rotate separately.  Thus, when in Neutral, the pinion gear is stationary, but all the gears will be spinning (presuming the clutch is engaged).  Naturally, 1st gear on the pinion shaft spins the slowest, and 5th gear the fastest.

This short video (taken on my iPhone) shows the gears in N whilst I rotate the main shaft by hand (out of view):

(https://i.imgur.com/L5CWVYA.mp4)

Wrapped around the dog gears are inner synchro rings.  Despite fitting loosely around the dog gear, they rotate together as a single unit: inner synchro ring/dog gear/speed gear.

When changing gear, a shift rod and fork slide an outer synchro sleeve.  To select 1st gear, the sleeve on the right would slide to the right.  As it moves across, the sleeve touches the inner synchro ring.  By doing so, it 'grabs' onto the inner synchro and starts to spin together in synchrony.

(https://i.imgur.com/n519eO6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/1OGK52l.jpg)

To fully engage the gear, the teeth lining the outer synchro sleeve lock with the dog gear.  The sleeve slides across on a 3-pronged hub; the two rotate together, interlocked.  The hub is fixed to the pinion shaft; hence, when the outer synchro sleeve spins, it is spinning the pinion shaft and forward motion is achieved.

To select 2nd gear, the shift rod slides the sleeve across to lock into the 2nd gear dog gear.

To select 3rd gear, the 1st/2nd gear sleeve is returned to the neutral position, then the next shift rod slides the 3rd/4th gear sleeve.  Across 5 gears, there are 3 outer synchro sleeves on 3 hubs.

(https://i.imgur.com/G4swNQ3.jpg)

Video of 1st gear engaged:

(https://i.imgur.com/ZK1PdwR.mp4)

The parts that a subject to wear are the dog gear teeth, the molybdenum surface of the inner synchro rings, and the teeth lining the inside of the outer synchro sleeves.

These are photos of spare parts that I may utilise to replace any worn ones.  Note the teeth lining the inside of the sleeve; then the inner synchro ring; and a spare 3rd speed gear with dog gear attached.

(https://i.imgur.com/psJxXft.jpg)

The teeth of the sleeve and dog gear engage and disengage during gear shifts, modelled with my spares:

(https://i.imgur.com/IahTNeo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/MORsIhn.jpg)

There you have it - I hope that has enlightened some of you!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6
Post by: shiny_car on July 08, 2021, 11:52:27 PM
Part 5

Finally, some of my new gear:

Rear brake discs, which are Tarox ventilated (SZ/RZ fitment), with 'F2000' grooves to match my front discs.

(https://i.imgur.com/xWLvhP2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/MhiTMfR.jpg)

New tools; upgrades of cheaper versions.  My existing budget tools are fine for general purpose, but I want the confidence that higher precision tools offer when rebuilding the gearbox and particularly when I rebuild the engine.

(https://i.imgur.com/8M0vBMh.jpg)

Mitutoyo (Made in Japan) digital calipers and digital micrometer.

(https://i.imgur.com/X09MNHV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dRzZF0R.jpg)

Warren & Brown (Made in Australia) digital angle torque wrench (3/8" drive, 6.8-135Nm).  The range of torque will suit most purposes on the car.  For an older vehicle like the 75, the workshop manual provides torque specifications, but not a step further to add angle (eg: tighten by a further x degrees beyond y Nm).  The feature may be useful in the future!

(https://i.imgur.com/w0sAPAq.jpg)

Norbar (Made in the UK) mechanical 'click' torque wrench with clockwise and anticlockwise function (1/2" drive, 60-340Nm).  The high range of torque suits, for example, the rear wheel shaft nuts and crankshaft pulley nut.  The anticlockwise function will be useful for reverse-thread parts like the left rear wheel bearing retaining ring nut.  This feature works by pushing the 1/2" socket head either side, to suit the direction of rotation (RED arrow; positioned partway either side).

(https://i.imgur.com/4hWV1Sl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/f9gjvat.jpg)

That's it for this month.  Thanks for viewing; any feedback and tips welcome!  By next month, I should have disassembled the gears, inspected, and replaced any worn parts, and then begun reassembling the whole gearbox.

 :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [updated 09 July 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on August 12, 2021, 05:36:04 PM
Hello again.  :)

August 2021 - Part 1

This month, I disassembled the gear set to inspect the synchros, and replace parts.  Much of it was repetitive (ie: same process for 2nd to 5th gear synchros), but I've included photos for reference.

I bought a deep (long) 36mm socket piece to remove the nut on the pinion shaft.  I had previously 'locked' the two gear shafts together by engaging two gears at the same time (2nd and 4th), making it easier to crack the nut loose.

(https://i.imgur.com/KeiKnY3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vIzIAdF.jpg)

After removing the R and 5th gears, I was able to remove the remaining shaft and gears from the flange at an angle.  Disassembling the main shaft was not required to change synchros.

(https://i.imgur.com/mdKdjOi.jpg)

Each shaft was supported by a double set of bearings (two rows).  These were secured to the intermediate flange by a steel retaining plate.  In these photos, where the shift rods were removed, you can make out the small holes between the position of the rods, for the sausage shaped interlock plungers to fit.

(https://i.imgur.com/lyxMAUt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/squgL7N.jpg)

I restacked the gears onto the shaft and loosely fitted the nut, to show the whole set prior to disassembly.

(https://i.imgur.com/g78qBqB.jpg)

Nut and R gear removed.

(https://i.imgur.com/XABi6Qv.jpg)

Three-blade hub supporting an outer synchro ring for 5th gear.  By actuating the shift rod, the synchro ring can engage with 5th gear (red arrows); no matching inner synchro for R gear.

(https://i.imgur.com/DBc1Hz1.jpg)

Hub, outer synchro ring, 5th gear and its bush.  The hub was splined, to interlock with the pinion shaft, meaning they rotate together, whereas the gears spun freely unless locked via the dog gear.

(https://i.imgur.com/2NQofYw.jpg)

Outer synchro ring, which initially grabs onto the inner synchro ring, to spin-up/down the gear prior to engaging the dog gear.  A bit of wear evident on the inner ring fitted to 5th gear.

(https://i.imgur.com/wEp7WNr.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JJbMYZp.jpg)

Spinning within the double-row bearings were the bearing inner races.  One each side (clutch side, and diff side), accompanied by a spacer and shim.

(https://i.imgur.com/aoTTXrz.jpg)

In this photo, on the diff side the inner race and shim are shown back in their original positions prior to removal. 

The shim was available in different thicknesses to help align the pinion gear teeth with the crown ring (diff) teeth at the factory, ranging from 1.15mm to 2.50mm, in increments of 0.05mm.  They also offered a 0.08mm shim, presumably to use in combination.

(https://i.imgur.com/NsCEYhn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/CAaIwkD.jpg)

My shim showed signs of some wear.  In particular, an inner ridge had developed on both sides.  The main flat portion measured as 1.72mm thick.

(https://i.imgur.com/Tme5AyP.jpg?1)

(https://i.imgur.com/SCzQdQQ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/j9JobUG.jpg?1)

I asked on the alfabb.com (US) forums, and it was suggested the ridges were mostly formed from radial loads on the shim, 'forcing' the metal to bulge, rather than axial wear.  Thus, the shim was probably originally 1.75mm thick, or possibly 1.80mm.  If the shim was very worn, resulting in significant misalignment/meshing of the pinion and crown ring teeth, there would be quite audible 'whine' from the gears, but my gearbox never exhibited such whine.

Regardless, I tried to source a replacement 1.75mm thick shim, but have been unable to find one.  If stacking two shims is no issue, I might try a 1.70 + 0.08mm combination.  On advice, I plan to temporarily refit the pinion shaft and diff, and visualise alignment using marking compound, so that's the future plan.

Next parts off the gear set were the 4th gear, associated bush/spacer, and the next hub and outer synchro ring.

(https://i.imgur.com/uWAfTRg.jpg)

Then 3rd gear, bush, and spacer.

(https://i.imgur.com/JEh9lBe.jpg)

2nd gear, bush, hub, and synchro.

(https://i.imgur.com/IY6rmqZ.jpg)

1st gear.

(https://i.imgur.com/yukG2Wc.jpg)

That left only the pinion shaft with its gear, and the bearing secured by a press-fitted spacer.  This did not require further disassembly.

(https://i.imgur.com/1dyWPjT.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yZ9p6qE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4ZKyRNh.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [updated 09 July 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on August 12, 2021, 05:38:17 PM
August 2021 - Part 2

Taking a break from the gears, I cleaned inside the diff casing.  Before and after photos, and location of the ventilation hole.

(https://i.imgur.com/KBVFoL6.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Lp3NWBu.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4i3pKrt.jpg)

The other end of the diff casing cleaned.

(https://i.imgur.com/A3maVtY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rpltVr6.jpg)

Remnants of the old blue sealant removed.

(https://i.imgur.com/9sLAp2Z.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KOS8G44.jpg)

Diff casing side cover.

(https://i.imgur.com/1sMvrHd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/agouCaA.jpg)

Outside of the cover, old sealant cleaned from around the axle hole.

(https://i.imgur.com/t8MHhNT.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/gfXhSBt.jpg)

I replaced the rear gearbox mount/bush.  My balljoint remover kit proved useful for this; the cylinders were the ideal sizes to press the bush out and back in.  The new bush was put in the freezer to shrink it, making fitment easier.

(https://i.imgur.com/qxp6QcT.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OTvzEwC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/01FVOei.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VNDCHys.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HHBtap2.jpg)

Oil seals for each diff axle were replaced.  These sections were disassembled by first removing the retaining ring: a medium (75mm) sized 'bearing splitter' was clamped behind the ring, heat applied (by MAPP gas blow torch), then used the hydraulic press.

(https://i.imgur.com/0iTon8P.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/8fJaPbO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/iktrtYH.jpg)

The flanged cover and bearing then readily pressed off the axle.  The above rings were very tight (normal), but the bearings less-so and no heat required.

(https://i.imgur.com/6XBXRHC.jpg?1)

On the first attempt, I was not mindful of the 'plastic' bearing carrier which smoked when I applied heat to the retaining ring.  Oops!  Some minor singeing, but fortunately insufficient to require replacement.  ::)

(https://i.imgur.com/biZg6cw.jpg)

Oil seal on other side.

(https://i.imgur.com/HiMogXP.jpg)

Pieces cleaned and seals removed.

(https://i.imgur.com/8sI0674.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Dg5mGZK.jpg)

Old sealant removed from the covers (bearing taped-over to keep clean).  New seals ready for fitment.

(https://i.imgur.com/jAEYaCC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/FfPrqk4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mWt6XRA.jpg)

Suitably sized drift pieces used to press the new seals into position.

(https://i.imgur.com/fFo5n7V.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GZqUl02.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5uIdQB7.jpg)

Added sealant around the edge using Permatex Optimum Grey.  Will reassemble once set.

(https://i.imgur.com/uUSxD4f.jpg)

10mm 'square' socket piece arrived, so I removed the 'container bolt' that I had trouble with previously.

(https://i.imgur.com/4Ve8CKP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/UkCXYwZ.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [updated 09 July 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on August 12, 2021, 05:39:50 PM
August 2021 - Part 3

Back to the gears.  For reassembly, I replaced all the inner synchro rings, outer synchro rings, and inspected the dog gears and replaced where deemed warranted.

The synchro setup on 1st gear was slightly different to all the others.  But all feature a heavy duty circlip (retaining ring) that was a little difficult to remove.  I had several tools available for the task, and found the straight nose version (in foreground) most effective, and the middle version helpful.

(https://i.imgur.com/e6eizVw.jpg)

1st gear retaining ring removed.  All the synchros utilise the same principle: when changing gear, the outer synchro ring (not shown) grips onto the inner synchro ring.  The ring is not a complete circle, and has an opening that interlocks with the locking sector; this piece is indirectly connected to the guide sector that in turn, interlocks with the dog gear which is fixed to the main gear.

(https://i.imgur.com/MLE2Fev.jpg)

Inner synchro ring removed.  It normally sits fairly loosely in position behind the retaining ring.

(https://i.imgur.com/iv6KBBt.jpg)

These were the 1st gear pieces connecting the synchro ring to the dog gear.  The unique feature of 1st gear was the spring retainer, which came into play when shifting from Neutral.  It was designed for smoother shifting, but in my experience was not very effective.

From the workshop manual: This solution allows a very smooth engagement of 1st speed to be obtained; in fact, in the event of sticking of [outer] sleeve toothing on [dog] gear front toothing, the spring is compressed and permits the gears to perform a slight rotation and then, a correct mating.

On the alfabb.com forum, a topic - First Gear Fix (https://www.alfabb.com/threads/first-gear-fix.29492/) -  pertaining to earlier Alfa Romeo gearboxes (eg: 105 and 115 series) recommends modifying the 1st gear synchro to the same as 2nd-5th gears.  Towards the end of the discussion, owners confirm it is also recommended in transaxle gearboxes to ditch the spring retainer in favour of a solid arc band piece like 2nd-5th.

(https://i.imgur.com/LnprqkI.jpg)

If I had any doubt, I was quickly convinced when I discovered the dog gear was broken!  I'm unsure how and when exactly this occurred, but I suspect during my clumsy removal of the circlip, the clip applied force onto this narrow segment of the dog, bending and snapping the base.

(https://i.imgur.com/RNpzlyM.jpg)

So, I replaced the dog gear, sourced from unused/new gears purchased for this purpose.

(https://i.imgur.com/QNyva0W.jpg)

The edges of a large (105mm) bearing splitter were firmly tightened into the recess of the dog gear (where the circlip fitted).  A suitably sized drift applied force from the hydraulic press to separate the dog gear from the main gear.  I also applied heat from a blow torch to the dog, to help expand and loosen the fit.

(https://i.imgur.com/Cl50F41.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yTHEZdU.jpg)

Same process to remove the original 1st gear dog gear.

(https://i.imgur.com/y4TTdAU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/93xWNJt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/WJYvjlH.jpg)

Broken 1st gear dog gear beside the replacement.  Compared with other gears, the dog was also a unique design, with the small broken segment creating two openings, instead of a single opening.

(https://i.imgur.com/Xo5ipP0.jpg)

New dog gear pressed onto 1st gear.

(https://i.imgur.com/1Uwhvhm.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/f1X55oy.jpg)

New long retainer arc band (same size as other side) replacing the 'short band + spring retainer'.

(https://i.imgur.com/jAOCvO4.jpg)

New replacement inner synchro ring compared with the old one.  The new ring is a 'yellow band' Goetze brand, same as the factory originals.  However, these are a modern reproduction ring, and 'new old stock' originals are no longer available as far as I know.  I'm unsure whether they are as good quality, but these are meant to be as good as you can currently purchase.

Note the areas of wear, especially near the opening.  This pattern suggested the old rings were 'ovalised' (ie: not perfectly circular), and indeed, compared with the replacements the ends were slightly splayed.  Production issue or a result of wear and tear forces?  I have no information about the brand or quality of these rings.

(https://i.imgur.com/TJxcF6q.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/03SkS28.jpg)

Everything refitted for a completed, overhauled 1st gear.

(https://i.imgur.com/RXIoTok.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/U50pp8S.jpg)

2nd gear.  Compared with 1st gear, as standard there were two equal length solid retainer bands.

(https://i.imgur.com/hw1ofzy.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0trEisc.jpg)

The dog gear teeth were like new, suggestive of previous replacement.  No need for a new one.  As far as I know, there have never been aftermarket reproduction dog gears for transaxle gearboxes, only factory original stock.  Thus, any replacements are sourced from NOS or cannibalised from old gearboxes.

(https://i.imgur.com/vNHBWuA.jpg)

Inner synchro ring replaced for a new Goetze.

(https://i.imgur.com/Y7L5Orx.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nzWSu9u.jpg)

New outer synchro sleeve ring.  The existing one appeared in good condition, but I preferred to have a NOS factory original instead of aftermarket reproduction 'of unknown quality'.  The teeth on the NOS ring were actually flat compared with the version previously fitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/QgeQrmF.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7lVlFlk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/FIMHM0J.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [updated 09 July 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on August 12, 2021, 05:41:35 PM
August 2021 - Part 4

3rd gear.  I replaced the inner synchro ring.  Note how the existing ring was a different version, with a ribbed inner surface, and presumably a different brand to the others.  Dog gear teeth appeared as-new, and left alone.

(https://i.imgur.com/mRjGpa2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/veYLk4T.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/wIeL7oV.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/cDNEChB.jpg)

4th gear.  I replaced the inner synchro ring, and found the dog gear teeth to be slightly rounded.  Probably an original dog.

(https://i.imgur.com/gkn1AsA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/8SZglzD.jpg)

I pressed a new dog gear from a NOS gear, and replaced the old one.

(https://i.imgur.com/5HyuM90.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OC7fJsn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Zk5tT8i.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NkPxU5o.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4F2VnZa.jpg)

The next outer synchro sleeve ring was exchanged for another NOS one.

(https://i.imgur.com/RzDxSr0.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/iDeo19Q.jpg)

5th gear.  Inner synchro ring replaced.  Dog gear teeth were in top condition and left untouched.  The old synchro had an area that was recessed on the inner surface, which appeared to be an area of wear from rubbing against the guide sector.  Strange how different gears had such differences!  With the Goetze synchro ring fitted, it was not at all tight against the sector piece.

(https://i.imgur.com/8WPt3WG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ySvqtze.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/pkkrV9C.jpg)

Third and final outer synchro sleeve replaced.

(https://i.imgur.com/3QjCRYx.jpg)

Rebuild time!  I smeared some Redline 75W90NS gearbox oil onto the parts during reassembly.

(https://i.imgur.com/anNtLrf.jpg)

1st gear, hub with new synchro sleeve, and 2nd gear.

(https://i.imgur.com/QOE25zM.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PJgraw9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/X8T2FPn.jpg)

3rd gear, hub with new synchro sleeve, and 4th gear.

(https://i.imgur.com/3aj7ZZv.jpg)

Original shim refitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/3GqAAQX.jpg)

Then inner race refitted, and shaft slotted back through the bearings in the intermediate flange.

(https://i.imgur.com/xwLXgTl.jpg)

5th gear, hub and new synchro ring, and R gear.

(https://i.imgur.com/C5VKkov.jpg)

New shaft nuts.  Because I never removed the original main shaft 30mm nut, the new one will remain spare.

(https://i.imgur.com/tyqZQvq.jpg)

Pinion shaft nut fitted and tightened to-spec (112-124Nm).  At this stage, I have not 'staked' the new nut, waiting until I check alignment of the pinion with crown ring gears. 

(https://i.imgur.com/Os6gfgw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/M3IvUH7.jpg)

Gear set flipped over, and diff casing temporarily fitted.  After I rebuild the diff, it can be fitted to check the alignment.  By this time, I had forgotten to recheck the gear stack height (though mostly academic because my measuring setup was imperfect and unlikely to demonstrate an accurate reading within the factory tolerance of +/-0.03mm), but I can check when the sections are disassembled again.

(https://i.imgur.com/fAbnpNY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/5nkiqbI.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/e2ddK13.jpg)

This ends the month's update, but by now you're probably tired of seeing gears!  I lost a few days of work time because of other developments in my garage.

Some of you may have read my posts in other topics, but this happened:

bye bye 155, it was fun having you

(https://i.imgur.com/7hI8rMK.jpg)

leading to this

(https://i.imgur.com/orLlpvh.jpg)

but unfortunately resulting in this

(https://i.imgur.com/bWAkM5I.jpg)

so now I'm waiting to collect this!

(https://i.imgur.com/Th5L2YB.jpg)

Good times!  See you next month.  :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [updated 12 August 2021]
Post by: Colin Edwards on August 13, 2021, 01:55:46 PM
You should be happy with the Tarox ventilated rotors.  I have a rear set on my 75.  Allows you to dial in a bit more rear brake bias with little risk of fade.   
Interesting to see the guts of a transaxle.  The inner workings of any gearbox fascinates me.  I regularly rebuild a Hewland LD200.  The Hewland transaxle seems simple compared to the Alfa unit. 
The phenolic cages on those bearings are VERY sensitive to heat!  Try to keep any flame well away!  Phenolic cage equipped rolling bearings are low friction, low inertia, low noise...…...but high cost!!
At least the silver Giulietta wont show the dirt light black does!
The 155 is a rare beast!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [updated 12 August 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on August 14, 2021, 03:42:36 AM
Thanks Colin.

Yes, gearboxes fascinate me too, lol!  I never knew how it worked until now.

I look forward to having the Giulietta.  As a daily driver, black was always going to be trouble to keep looking clean.  Though I have a couple other black cars, and love the colour; those cars live inside the garage, so it's ok.  I'll apply a ceramic coating (Gyeon Synchro), so it will be easy enough to wash and clean every fortnight.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [updated 10 September 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on September 10, 2021, 06:20:04 PM
Hello again.  Welcome to this September update.  I have continued chipping away at various aspects of the transaxle rebuild; it's a long process, but I'll get there!

September 2021 - Part 1

I gave the diff axles a coat of paint over the exposed surfaces, to provide some protection against corrosion.  I previously cleaned them with wax&grease remover, and my Dremel tool with stainless wire brush attachments.  After masking the surfaces not to be painted, I sprayed primer then dark metallic grey.  I used VHT high temp Engine Enamel even though these parts did not warrant special treatment.

(https://i.imgur.com/oWgnNHW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ogsEvHk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/pS80NyX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/uXemqtC.jpg)

On the gear casing, I changed the two oil seals for the main input shaft and shift rod.  I also had a new shift rod support bush that fitted behind the oil seal.

The oil seals were easy to wrangle out, but the bush proved troublesome.    A tool like a generic 'seal puller' might have worked best, but I utilised what tools I already had.  The irregular casting of the casing prevented the optimal size drift from passing through the opening to push the bush out from behind.  A small drift resulted in pushing out the core of the bush (inner metal sleeve), tearing the surrounding rubber, and leaving the outer metal sleeve firmly stuck.

(https://i.imgur.com/sOyOEKN.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OnUrVW5.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nVRVnhN.jpg)

Contending with the outer sleeve was a nightmare.  A hacksaw blade, jigsaw, and Dremel were used to cut through the sleeve, then plenty of hammering with a cold chisel.  The edges of the sleeve suggested it was a couple millimetres thick, but it actually thickened in the centre to nearly 4mm!

I didn't let it beat me and managed to remove the mangled sleeve whilst butchering the gearbox   :o .  Had it been a more critical area (eg: for a bearing) I would have been more circumspect.

(https://i.imgur.com/LT2W9zW.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GXHQprt.jpg)

I cleaned up some of the damage with a Dremel sanding drum and flap wheel.  Then pressed the new bush into position with a liberal amount of Locktite Blue to help fill the divots.

(https://i.imgur.com/o73zjTd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ouXmJuG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ujxQwsR.jpg)

The oil seals were no trouble, and were finished with some Permatex Optimum Grey sealant around the edges.

(https://i.imgur.com/WmMxgiT.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/noXFsMD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/DZUcuhJ.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [updated 10 September 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on September 10, 2021, 06:21:24 PM
September 2021 - Part 2

On to the limited slip differential (LSD).  As shown in May, I bought an upgrade/overhaul kit from Racing Diffs in Serbia, designed as a direct swap-out.  The LSD in transaxles is a mechanical clutch-type.

The internal clutch discs naturally wear out, so from all reports any LSD of this age would probably offer no actual function unless previously overhauled.  I had no idea of the status of my diff, and no ready means to make measurements, so presumed it was all original and worn.  The factory setup utilises two clutch discs, offering around '25% lockup'.  A common upgrade is changing to four clutch discs, providing around 50% lockup.

The Racing Diffs kit not only provides four clutch discs, but adds preload shims that create constant pressure to keep the discs ‘active'.  I've read pros and cons for this; some people are against having any preload because it causes faster wear and generates more heat.  But even though the discs might wear faster, their function is effective for a longer lifespan because everything is kept firmly compressed.  Whether due to the materials used, the disc design (in particular the addition of oil holes), or the preload shims, Racing Diffs claim longevity of twice normal.  The factory setup provides no preload

Traction improves with an LSD, but also promotes oversteer in wet conditions, and understeer in the dry.  Increasing the lockup percentage would only exaggerate this.  I'm not really qualified to determine exactly what suits anyone best, but I interpret having good LSD function as a 'performance upgrade'.

Does anyone here have the Racing Diffs setup?  I'm interested to hear feedback about any good and bad aspects.  I'm also interested to hear about people who have upgraded to four 'standard' clutch discs, and particularly how they've found it on the street, in wet and dry.

Time to crack open this diff!

(https://i.imgur.com/Q4yUlzo.jpg)

The workshop manual recommended marking the diff casing and cover, to ensure they were refitted in the same orientation.  I used a 'punch'.  The diff was secured in a vice to hold it still and remove the bolts on the cover.  It's not recommended to remove the large ring gear or bearings unless strictly necessary, because minor changes can upset alignment with the pinion gear, and backlash and preload between diff unit and gearbox casing.

(https://i.imgur.com/MM5TUGo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/WF8F2o6.jpg)

Cover off, and first half of the LSD internals removed, comprising the clutch disc and plates, thrust ring and crown gear.

(https://i.imgur.com/7u7WTs9.jpg)

Inside the cover was a tabbed 'shim ring', featuring a 'wrought' surface.  A similar shim ring existed on the other side of the diff.  The ends of the crown gears spun against these.

(https://i.imgur.com/ACW77YT.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/pY0XaTq.jpg)

Then, three 'external blade plates' and a single 'internal clutch disc'.  The bladed plates locked externally into the surrounding diff casing; they thus rotated with the casing, but were free to move side-to-side when the parts were compressed during lockup.  The clutch disc had internal splines to lock into the axles, but could also move sideways.

The blade plates had smooth surfaces, and the clutch disc had a rough friction surface.  Without a new disc for comparison, I didn't know how worn it was.

(https://i.imgur.com/i92o6qM.jpg)

Everything removed from the casing.

(https://i.imgur.com/mG3DBFA.jpg)

The other side had a similar setup of three blade plates and single clutch disc, a tabbed shim ring, but also a spacer ring (smooth, no blades or splines).

When everything is assembled, the factory specification suggests clearance behind the cover (ie: a gap, without preload) of 0.1-0.2mm.  This can be achieved by using blade plates of different thicknesses.  Each are about 2mm thick, but are available in three thicknesses: 1.90 / 2.00 / 2.10mm.

(https://i.imgur.com/P8RRr7o.jpg)

The central 'spider' comprised four small side-pinion gears and their interlocking spider shafts.

(https://i.imgur.com/G0W6hab.jpg)

On either side of the spider were crown gears: the splines secured the clutch discs.  The thrust rings (only one shown here) fitted over each crown gear, holding everything in position, and had protruding external 'blades' to lock into the diff casing like the blade plates.

Note the V-shaped cut-outs for the spider shafts.  These particular factory cut-outs were at 45 degrees (green lines).

(https://i.imgur.com/vSCPsmc.jpg)

Here, I held the pieces together with clamps to show the assembly in its resting state.  The spider shaft is centrally located within the 'ramps' on each thrust ring.  Thus, the thrust rings are positioned closely together (red arrows), and exert no force on the clutch discs that normally sit either side.

(https://i.imgur.com/4LjuTs2.jpg)

During hard acceleration, the thrust rings push against the spider shafts and are forced apart (red arrows); the same scenario occurs if one wheel starts to slip.  The amount the rings spread apart is exaggerated in my photo, but they compress the clutch discs and blade plates together, and friction locks the components to limit slip.

(https://i.imgur.com/JIXBlD0.jpg)

With the factory setup, up to 25% of the torque feeding to the 'fast spinning' (ie: slipping) wheel is transferred to the other (gripping) wheel.  In a modified LSD with around 50% lockup, up to 50% torque would feed to the gripping wheel.  Without an LSD (ie: 0% lockup or 'open' diff), around 0% of torque is transferred to the gripping wheel, which means all the torque goes to the slipping wheel and the car has no grip, and no movement.

The 'ramp angle' significantly affects performance of the LSD.  At one extreme, a 90 degree cut would create a square box, and the spider shafts would have no effect on pushing the thrust rings apart.  A shallow cut, like 30 degrees, would be much easier for the spider shafts to slide against, making for a more immediate and forceful effect.  45 degrees - like the Alfa Romeo thrust rings - operates somewhere inbetween.

The Alfa LSD also works equally in both directions - during acceleration and lift-off/deceleration - for a '2-way' action.  Racing Diffs also manufacture aftermarket thrust rings with different ramp angles cut into each ring to choose from, for either more aggressive or less aggressive action, but I decided against fitting these at this stage.  The choice of angles are 30/30 degrees (aggressive, 2-way), 30/60 degrees (aggressive in one direction, less aggressive the other, '1.5-way'), or 50/65 degrees (less aggressive each direction, 1.5-way).  A combination of differing angles for each direction creates a 1.5-way LSD.

If I find the new upgrade too aggressive, I could try the Racing Diffs rings with the 50/65 setting: the combination of less aggressive ramps with extra clutch discs might be a nice compromise that still offers more grip than the factory setup (I'll have to research how to calculate the percentage lockup).

(https://i.imgur.com/xWZ56LF.jpg)

The diff casing naturally had four 'splines' (channels) to secure the bladed plates and thrust rings.  This prevented the parts rotating against each other, but could still slide axially along the channels, for lock-up and release.

(https://i.imgur.com/BrxSqbT.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/RYcN4nA.jpg)

Showing the new Racing Diffs parts alongside the old originals.  The new parts replaced only the blade plates and clutch discs, meaning the original spacer was retained.  Note the old setup comprised four parts each side, each about 2mm thick, for a total stack thickness of 8mm.  The new setup had five parts, and not surprisingly each was 1.6mm thick, creating the same total stack thickness.

The new clutch discs featured holes, to capture oil and facilitate lubrication to reduce heat and wear.  There were two discs for each side instead of the old single disc design.

(https://i.imgur.com/JNhUnCY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/QS60EPL.jpg)

The new preload shims were conical shaped, like a Belleville spring washer.

(https://i.imgur.com/IePqfBP.jpg)

Reassembly with the new parts, each liberally coated with Redline oil.  The second clutch disc on view in the photo will rotate directly against the thrust ring, but from all reports this does not cause concern for damaging wear.

(https://i.imgur.com/gu9FR7a.jpg)

One thrust ring, crown gear, and half the spider fitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/lCkds7y.jpg)

This was the new setup: crown gear inside the thrust ring, and new stack.  The splined clutch discs locked over the crown gear, and rotated together.  They were free to rotate independently of the thrust ring and blade plates (red arrows).

(https://i.imgur.com/vhBEfTJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/JZJOBxj.jpg)

All internal components now fitted into the diff casing, with preload shim on top.

(https://i.imgur.com/ggxDojz.jpg)

Presence of the preload shims created a total internal component thickness about 4mm greater than the original.  The photo shows the cover resting in position, and the gap to overcome to clamp everything together.

I used the hydraulic press to hold the cover closed whilst torquing the bolts, and completing the upgraded LSD.

(https://i.imgur.com/2IGZwP9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2aNkzQ7.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [updated 10 September 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on September 10, 2021, 06:23:19 PM
September 2021 - Part 3

Next up, the clutch.

I first removed the clutch from the housing.  After unscrewing the double-nuts , the fork and dust cover came apart without difficulty.

(https://i.imgur.com/Cl9f0ZX.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/WsbKMd1.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4jQGUqi.jpg)

The clutch shaft was supported towards each end by bearings in the housing.  The housing will be replaced by the reinforced version I have, which already shipped with new bearings fitted.  Though I needed to transfer the rubber boot and plastic bush that the end of the shift rod passed through.  There was a lot of surface rust on the clutch flywheel.

(https://i.imgur.com/eQ9PrMd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/y78Mpk8.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/BabecCx.jpg)

The pressure plate was unbolted from the flywheel, revealing the clutch disc.  The splined input shaft from the gearbox normally passes through and interlocks with the clutch disc, so they always spin together.

(https://i.imgur.com/yaNDXar.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Y87ZieV.jpg)

What I hadn't previously appreciated, was that the double-sided clutch disc provided two separate friction facings to mate with the flywheel and the pressure plate; I had really only envisaged one mating surface.  It now makes sense to see clutch discs that can have two different materials - or two the same - on each side that provide different characteristics for clamping force and slip, which affects how 'grabby' a clutch is, and how much torque can be transferred without slipping.

My clutch disc was standard/OEM from what I could tell, with an 'organic material' surface on both sides, and central springs to reduce vibration and assist smooth engagement.

(https://i.imgur.com/D55ngIo.jpg)

This was the flywheel in more detail, with clutch shaft bolted in position.  The friction surface appeared alright; clearly seen some heavy use, with patches of burn marks, but otherwise smooth.  Having never seen a used clutch before, I don't know whether it's any worse than expected.

(https://i.imgur.com/q3STvWJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/g48jKwO.jpg)

I marked the orientation of the shaft relative to the flywheel with some tape, then separated the parts for cleaning; I also taped over the central needle bearing to protect against contamination.  These are 'before and after' photos, when I used wire brushes on a drill and Dremel to clean the surfaces.  They cleaned up quite well, though the friction surface could probably benefit from professional machining.

(https://i.imgur.com/txG3wi9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/bNSrqiU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Cih2el7.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mL8bRtC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/WPu1lJh.jpg)

The bearing appeared in good condition, so left alone.  I temporarily bolted the shaft back onto the flywheel, but as per the workshop manual, I need to add thread locker (ie: Loctite) for final assembly.

(https://i.imgur.com/QLKu1MR.jpg)

I don't know anything about clutch discs, so I didn't know how worn this was.  Appeared ok.

(https://i.imgur.com/7sRF4cO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/z5bjnmo.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/gLX4AID.jpg)

I gave the disc a clean to remove any build-up of clutch dust, that was mostly in the rivet holes.  Nice colour springs  ;D .

(https://i.imgur.com/PhcU5ZI.jpg)

Next, was the pressure plate and throwout (aka thrust) bearing.  The bearing attached to the centre of the pressure plate diaphragm by way of a retaining ring.  This ring was secured by a circlip.

Exposing the circlip, for removal, required downward pressure with the throwout bearing resting on a hard surface underneath.  No special tool required to remove the clip.

(https://i.imgur.com/BJZEFvO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/vbjpFbk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/dBiVGYh.jpg)

The throwout bearing was then easily removed from the pressure plate.  When removing the circlip, the Belleville spring washer on the other side was being compressed; certainly wasn't compressing the spring fingers of the diaphragm, which require far greater force.

(https://i.imgur.com/W7Pj1yk.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HZl7LJB.jpg)

Access to the bearing was possible by removing the main hub piece.  This also had a circlip, which I removed with a dental pick tool.

(https://i.imgur.com/nJ4Qe1S.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9524boO.jpg)

The hub could then be pressed out (not something do-able by hand).

(https://i.imgur.com/t3qpCsn.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ijOvE7h.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/D3yXkqf.jpg)

The protruding inner race was the section that attached to the pressure plate diaphragm.  The hub, now removed, press-fitted into the outer race.

(https://i.imgur.com/oh9Q488.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4JRoba9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/svSwblK.jpg)

With everything separated, the pieces were cleaned, and fresh bearing grease applied using a syringe.

(https://i.imgur.com/OV9wnAD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rHkQ8gh.jpg)

After the fresh grease, the parts were reassembled.

(https://i.imgur.com/foCBsmv.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/KgBwdeo.jpg)

Finally, the pressure plate was inspected and cleaned.  This piece could not be dismantled; it comprised the main pressure plate ring, spring loaded by the diaphragm/spring fingers, and attached to the outer mounting ring that bolted to the flywheel.

(https://i.imgur.com/nS72z5t.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/pd5BhSF.jpg)

The pressure plate was cleaned using a wire wheel over the friction surface.  Like the flywheel, the surface was still smooth but showed some burn marks.

(https://i.imgur.com/14zumE1.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/8no553v.jpg)

The clutch was reassembled.  I am yet to determine what plans I have for the clutch, and need to speak with experienced workshops for advice.  Happy to hear input from anyone here, of course.  I would like to have the flywheel lightened (but by how much?), and see what options are available for a heavy duty clutch, suitable for my engine upgrades.

(https://i.imgur.com/4yvAQnY.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/H2mUDhN.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [updated 10 September 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on September 10, 2021, 06:24:11 PM
September 2021 - Part 4

The last photos for this month are of new parts that have arrived.

Ordered from Richard Jemison in the US (via alfabb.com forums), are a set of cams of his design, for a 'fast street' engine.  I'm no cam expert, but these focus on torque, as much as peak power, for great drivability on the road, with higher lift, and optimised duration and overlap.  Combined with other engine work (particularly valve seats, porting, programmable ECU, fuelling, exhaust) and correct timing, I expect a 30% increase towards 180kW and 300Nm.  From my research, his cam designs are amongst the best available, without exaggeration, based upon both reputation and dyno charts.  He has a large range on offer, catering for any needs, whether the engine is standard, lightly modified, or heavily modified, for street or track.  He makes no secret of the specs, but seems confident that through his partnership with Web Cam, the manufacturer, no one else in the world can produce anything comparable.  Well, not unless you have the $$ and know exactly what you want, and have your own custom set produced.

Due to COVID, it took 4 months to fulfil this order.  This hasn't impacted my progress of course, as I haven't  removed the engine yet!  My order also included upgraded valve springs (that are actually designed for a Kawasaki motorbike engine), and a set of modified cam pulley hubs which create a vernier pulley for fine adjustment.  This will be particularly helpful after installing the modified cambelt and pulley/bearing upgrade I showed back in June.

(https://i.imgur.com/hnNyppJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/zsxYEMf.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/wH8XfjG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/89PDZd8.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/0zh1pZs.jpg)

That's it for this month!  Thanks again for looking and reading.

In case you haven't read everything (can't blame you!!), I do have some questions:

- any feedback on LSD upgrades to either 4 clutch discs, or using the Racing Diffs kit?  Has it been a good upgrade for handling and traction?  Or is the car a handful to drive?!

- is it useful to lighten the clutch flywheel, and by how much?
- what clutch upgrades are available (eg: pressure plate and clutch disc) to suit a street car with no more than 200kW and 320Nm?  It won't need to handle the 'abuse' of track use, just for the rare spirited drive on the weekend; can I even stick with the factory clutch?
- I will likely have any work done by Beninca, but open to the suggestion of other workshops; has Vin Sharp retired from such jobs?

Thanks! :)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [updated 10 September 2021]
Post by: Duk on September 19, 2021, 04:27:08 PM
Some more, excellent postings Shiny!  8)

It's always good to take possession of high quality tools, especially measuring tools. And you've bought some of the best.

The angle function/feature of your torque wrench is used where 'torque to yield' bolts are used.
Lots and lots of engines use torque to yield head bolts. Where the final step is to rotate the bolt a certain number of degrees, rather than to a specific torque number.
Torque to yield bolts are a 1 time use. If they are tightened to their yield point, then they must be replaced if they are ever undone.
The studded Alfa V6 engine doesn't torque to yield fasteners, so that's not applicable to them.
ARP head studs can also be reused and sometimes actual torque wrench settings are available rather than using the manufacturers head bolt tightening procedure that uses a final rotational angle.

Your choice of RJR cams is very interesting.
Richard has made some pretty bold claims over the years, about his camshafts.
American dyno numbers (that can be a pretty good giggle, if you see what the sort of numbers Yanky LS1/2/77/4003 'tuners' claim) aside, I think that he's probably pretty much on the money.
I look forward to seeing your results.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [updated 10 September 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on September 19, 2021, 07:37:20 PM
Hey Duk!  Good to hear from you again.  :)

Good info about the angle wrench, thank you.

I look forward to seeing my engine results too, lol.  But you know how it goes; it will probably be at least another 12 months before the engine is done.  :P
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [Updated 12 October 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on October 12, 2021, 09:40:50 PM
Time for the October update.  Whilst not as many photos to show, there was still plenty of tedious work, that simply took more time.  In particular, I hate working on brakes!  ::) >:( ;D

I started overhauling the rear brake calipers.  Also decided to change the gearshaft shim for something slightly thicker.  And started reassembling the gearbox.  There's no doubt I'm 'slow and steady' at this, but I also wanted to maintain a meticulous standard.

October 2021 - Part 1

I reassembled the diff axle stubs.  The workshop manual called for Molykote BR2 grease applied to the sealing surface and behind; I substituted this for Penrite Molygrease EP 3%, which is very similar (NLGI 2 thickness, lithium soap grease with molybdenum disulphide solids).  Instead of a grease gun, I like to use a medicine syringe to squirt grease into tight spots; of course, the grease will react with the plastic/rubber to cause swelling, so it's a 'single use only' job then throw away.

(https://i.imgur.com/AcP3XsB.jpg)

The axles were carefully passed through the greased seals and bearings.  Then the retaining ring, which required a lot more force, and as per the manual, was preheated with a MAPP blowtorch.

(https://i.imgur.com/F6OBFVH.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OuD3YND.jpg)

Two overhauled diff axle units.

(https://i.imgur.com/ubUfKYW.jpg)

Now I could temporarily refit the differential, and evaluate the pinion gear 'depth' relative to the ring gear.  Firstly, the left diff axle refitted.

(https://i.imgur.com/0VbfSlr.jpg)

To inspect the pinion gear depth, I used marking compound, painted onto the gear teeth.

(https://i.imgur.com/WGYmBCJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/YhNZdgs.jpg)

The diff was refitted with cover and right side axle.

(https://i.imgur.com/WFHKxmg.jpg)

After spinning the gears, forwards and reverse, the diff was removed to check the results.  I'm new to this process, so I honestly can't say I've interpreted them properly.

This was the diff ring gear, looking at the marking compound in the forwards direction of rotation; that is, the drive side of the teeth.  It's subtle, but my impression was the pinion gear markings were slightly towards the outside, or the heel of the ring gear.  Regardless, it appears quite well centred, which was ideal.

(https://i.imgur.com/KDtiXfo.jpg)

In the reverse direction, looking at the coast side of the teeth, it appeared slightly towards the inside, or toe.

(https://i.imgur.com/2vNEfol.jpg)

From my reading, markings on the drive side towards the heel, and coast side towards the toe, suggested a pinion depth that was too shallow or low.  That is, the pinion gear should be moved inwards towards the toe of the ring gear teeth.  Of course, that meant the shim was too thin, which made complete sense because my shim showed signs of wear.

When I measured the thickness of my shim, it was 1.72mm thick, and postulated the original was 1.75mm thick.  I previously reported I could not find a new 1.75mm thick shim.  However, I was able to buy new 1.70mm and 0.08mm shims.  Combined, whilst thicker than the original, it should accommodate gradual wear, and not require replacement any time soon.

The new shims combined for a total of 1.79mm.  The 0.08mm shim was indeed thin!  I hope it lasts, and doesn't disintegrate.  ???

(https://i.imgur.com/eV1Xfqm.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/eNfTfRq.jpg)

After dismantling the gearbox again, and fitting the new shim combo, I re-tested with marking compound.  Now it appeared as though the shim was slightly too thick - drive side towards the toe, coast side towards the heel.  But still quite well centred, overall.  So that was the setup I decided to keep, and hope it does not generate gearbox whine!

(https://i.imgur.com/w4F4EIh.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/osEk7Jp.jpg)

Finally, I caulked the pinion shaft nut.

(https://i.imgur.com/IlqCKyE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/ecSwgIX.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [Updated 12 October 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on October 12, 2021, 09:42:11 PM
October 2021 - Part 2

I started on the rear brakes.  Initially, cleaned up the hard lines.  As much as I would find making new lines rewarding, I will just stick with the original stuff.  I would probably get carried away, at great expense  ::).  Though...would you recommend plated copper, copper/nickel, or stainless  ;D ?!

(https://i.imgur.com/WawHPCv.jpg)

T-piece, tube nuts, and brackets were degreased then polished with the Dremel and wire brush attachments.  These will be painted.

(https://i.imgur.com/8GbYkJ9.jpg)

Now onto the calipers.  I remember the front calipers (the upgraded Brembos) were a dirty job, but the rears were even dirtier!  Brake fluid, grease, and grime.  Did I say I hate brakes?!

I won't post full details of the dismantling process.  This is well documented in a thread from the US alfabb.com forums.  I have uploaded the pdf of the relevant posts - with the original photos embedded - to download, and a link to the original forum thread - but photos links broken.  There's also a youtube clip for a similar caliper.  Great references if you want to tackle them too.

pdf: Rebuilding that Pesky Milano/GTV6 Rear Caliper (https://drive.google.com/file/d/1u3Bw0dYUGFBKpYzhQcZarXyNS1NdEXIm/view?usp=sharing) (pdf including original photos)
alfabb.com thread: Rebuilding that Pesky Milano/GTV6 Rear Caliper (https://www.alfabb.com/threads/rebuilding-that-pesky-milano-gtv6-rear-caliper.155782/) (no photos, but further discussion posts)
https://youtu.be/dm_DnizKOZM

(https://i.imgur.com/NTgASWc.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/3lxZQyw.jpg)

I started with coarse stainless wire brushes on the power drill, to remove the top layer of gunk - you can pick which one was cleaned.

(https://i.imgur.com/Y6T0vRK.jpg)

Most of the old brake fluid dribbled out after removing the bleed screws.  Didn't look like clean fluid!

(https://i.imgur.com/fxinE23.jpg)

I used an impact wrench to remove the four M7 bolts.  The outer two were shorter, and the heads partly recessed; even with a narrow-walled socket piece it was difficult to gain full purchase on the hex head, so an impact wrench helped avoid rounding them.

(https://i.imgur.com/GTC84zP.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/03gxhtg.jpg)

With the caliper halves separated, you could see the fluid channels, with O-ring seals.

(https://i.imgur.com/n8L9x7p.jpg)

The halves were cleaned more thoroughly with small stainless wire brush attachments on a Dremel tool.  The dust seals were only split and damaged during cleaning; I have replacements.  I paid careful attention to the surfaces supporting the brake pads.  They weren't as pitted and corroded as the Brembos I sourced from the UK.

(https://i.imgur.com/3xRJ0zx.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/nomCRnK.jpg)

I wound out the piston on the inner half of the caliper, then pulled it free.

(https://i.imgur.com/guU1i5t.jpg)

All other parts - except the external winder - were removed.  Accessing the circlip securing the handbrake lever required removal of a Welch plug.  This was removed by cutting a slot through the top with a Dremel cutting wheel, then using a flat blade screwdriver to wrangle it out.

(https://i.imgur.com/lW4m58x.jpg)

On the outer half of the caliper, the piston was wound out, then the winder was removed.  More dirty brake fluid in the caliper.

(https://i.imgur.com/f0eL3XW.jpg)

Deeper inside the piston cavities were the rubber main seals.

(https://i.imgur.com/CTfPSIB.jpg)

The left side caliper was similarly cleaned and stripped.

(https://i.imgur.com/8AymFth.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Qwak3kV.jpg)

The caliper halves were thoroughly wiped with wax & grease remover, and aerosol brake cleaner.  I also used compressed air to blow out old fluid from all the channels.

(https://i.imgur.com/XDJ9ylL.jpg)

Then carefully masked, for painting, and temporarily reassembled with the new spacers.

(https://i.imgur.com/vMMUeEs.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/TBAO8iC.jpg)

Next they were sprayed with a bazillionty (real word, right?  ;) ) coats of Red VHT High Temperature Caliper paint followed by Clear Caliper paint.

After the paint has dried for a week, I will cure it in the oven, as per the VHT instructions.

(https://i.imgur.com/7zWrNJU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OPOheHO.jpg)

The handbrake levers, spring retainers, and new (longer) caliper bolts were also sprayed.  Started here with etch primer.

(https://i.imgur.com/Y0nF8dz.jpg)

By next month, I should have the calipers completed.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [Updated 12 October 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on October 12, 2021, 09:42:54 PM
October 2021 - Part 3

With the pinion gear depth finalised, I started reassembling the gearbox.

This was the cleaned shift rod for 5th/R gears.  The circumferential detent, near the shift fork, was for the spring loaded ball to hold the rod in Neutral, and allow the sausage-shaped interlock plunger to drop into.  Alongside this, the small detent for the ball to help lock in Reverse gear. This detent was not circumferential because the rod needed to push the interlock plunger out into the adjacent (3rd/4th gear) shift rod, locking that rod in N and preventing it from accidentally sliding at the same time.

Further along was the recess for the R gear button switch, that activated the reverse lights.  The tip of the button sits in the recess until R gear is selected.

(https://i.imgur.com/HLThyT6.jpg)

The workshop manual recommended using AGIP Grease 33/FD bentonite clay grease to lubricate the detent balls and interlock plungers.  Penrite Bentone HD Grease was unavailable, so I used Castrol Spheerol HTB (High Temperature Bearing grease thickened with bentonite clay).

Bentonite clay greases are apparently incompatible with many other greases, so the relevant parts were cleaned carefully of old grease.  I also sourced a new container bolt to replace the one with the damaged head.

(https://i.imgur.com/NPNi1D7.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/H8h1JGS.jpg)

After the 5th/R rod was fitted, I reinserted the lower interlock plunger.  In the photo, it's clearly on view because it was not fully seated into the hole.

(https://i.imgur.com/gLyyx8q.jpg)

The 3rd/4th gear shift rod was cleaned for refitment.  There was a circumferential detent for the interlock plungers and detent ball, and a groove for the fork bolt that orientates the fork at the correct angle.

(https://i.imgur.com/tReUCwB.jpg)

3rd/4th gear shift rod refitted, and the upper interlock plunger.

(https://i.imgur.com/SaIZP9l.jpg)

1st/2nd gear shift rod cleaned.

(https://i.imgur.com/0JcDPMo.jpg)

The final rod refitted, and container bolts with springs and detent balls partly screwed back into position.  I will add sealant before screwing the bolts down completely.

(https://i.imgur.com/uSQIk7B.jpg)

This was a new main control shift rod.  This should help remove any sloppiness in the shift action.

I covered the splines on the main shaft in preparation for sliding it through the new oil seal in the gearbox casing, to prevent damage.

(https://i.imgur.com/6lcdUuK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/gDm3kxE.jpg)

By next month, the gearbox should be reassembled.

No new performance parts to show this month.  Thanks again for looking.  8)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [Updated 12 November 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on November 12, 2021, 01:10:32 AM
November update!  Gearbox is back together, and rear brakes done.

November 2021 - Part 1

I read various recommendations for gearbox sealant, and decided upon Loctite 518.  It's an anaerobic sealant, so there's no rush to mate the pieces together because it won't start to cure until the parts are joined.  It's a gel, and I found it quite difficult to squeeze from the tube but otherwise easy to spread and clean up.

I also bought Loctite 7649 Surface Primer, to ensure all my Loctite products cure properly.

(https://i.imgur.com/HesoSTy.jpg)

First pieces to refit and seal were the Reverse gear Interlock Plunger lockout mechanism.

(https://i.imgur.com/95iBHvr.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mgH1dJ6.jpg)

Then, the clutch-speed casing.  From a dry run, I found it easier to sit the intermediate flange and gear shafts horizontally, then support the Reverse idler gear and shift fork by hand, until the gear was supported by its shaft.

(https://i.imgur.com/IgC7z8w.jpg)

Loctite around the mating surface.  Then carefully slid the casing over the shafts ensuring the idler gear and shift fork were in correct positions.

(https://i.imgur.com/KCCTzUL.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/radNea5.jpg)

Once mated, I flipped the gearbox vertically.  Loctite to the flange, then slid the diff-speed casing back into final position.  New hardware - including zinc plated Grade 8.8 bolts and wave washers - were used, replicating the originals.

(https://i.imgur.com/ZEb5JIA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NllkGlA.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/QyS7Hmz.jpg)

Diff axles refitted, with Loctite sealant.

(https://i.imgur.com/7KGJIvt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/fFvuCvj.jpg)

Differential refitted, with oil on the bearings and shafts.

(https://i.imgur.com/sAyA7wc.jpg)

Then diff cover refitted, using new hardware, all torqued to spec.

(https://i.imgur.com/f0JMWZ9.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/oHePdgP.jpg)

Job done!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [Updated 12 November 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on November 12, 2021, 01:13:20 AM
November 2021 - Part 2

Back to the rear brake calipers.

After the paint dried for a week, I disassembled the calipers and removed the masking.  Notice I used the original bolts during painting; they will be replaced with new, longer bolts supplied with the spacer kit.

(https://i.imgur.com/SrySrCj.jpg)

VHT recommend curing the paint at 93º Celsius (200º Fahrenheit) for an hour.  I did it when my wife was at work  ;) .

(https://i.imgur.com/FpQxNAM.jpg)

I finished cleaning all the caliper parts before reassembly.

The pistons had superficial corrosion/grime around them, which was cleaned with a Dremel polishing wheel and polish.

(https://i.imgur.com/XxQSifj.jpg)

The self-adjusting mechanisms were removed (refer to the youtube video I linked to, last month).  Some old, gunky brake fluid required removal.  There were also a few spots of minor pitting, but nothing I was concerned about.

(https://i.imgur.com/bbDiF1m.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/yQ3l0mE.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/UNhc90t.jpg)

After cleaning, they were pressed back into position, using brake caliper lube around the snap ring.

(https://i.imgur.com/UK71F6m.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/x4WjNVO.jpg)

All the parts cleaned and ready for reassembly.  There were three rubber seals to be replaced (and probably a fourth around the external winder that I didn't remove from the caliper); two O-rings for the winders and a seal for the handbrake lever.

I previously purchased a Bigg Red (brand) seal kit, but this only provided piston seals.  After more searching, I determined a Frentech kit for the Alfetta was suitable (eBay UK), and included all the required seals plus more.  The Bigg Red dust seals were slightly thicker and more robust, so I used these.

(https://i.imgur.com/tjaEqrO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/a2H1Ao8.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/A2Qd0v0.jpg)

These were the handbrake lever, spring retaining bracket, and new bolts, after spraying the exposed surfaces metallic grey.

(https://i.imgur.com/VZwEZoq.jpg)

For reassembly, I used these products:
- Penrite Rubber Grease for the O-rings and seals
- Permatex Ceramic Brake Parts Lubricant high temperature grease for metal-to-metal surfaces; also rubber friendly
- brake fluid for the fluid channel O-rings between the caliper pieces

(https://i.imgur.com/htMLkoQ.jpg)

Lubricated and refitted the handbrake lever.

(https://i.imgur.com/i5wYMyx.jpg)

New 25mm diameter Welch plug fitted.  This was flattened and thus locked in position with the press and a socket piece.

(https://i.imgur.com/W0YRnXU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/rdtATts.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/v5KW0dW.jpg)

New O-ring fitted to the inside winder before refitting.

(https://i.imgur.com/C1viWwz.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/PkvpMfD.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/2Sb1M3d.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/hypc4Cs.jpg)

New piston seal and dust seal fitted; everything lubricated then the piston wound back into the caliper.  The handbrake operates only the inside piston.

(https://i.imgur.com/JrvZml3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/AFYRLNw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/XvA5FZO.jpg)

New O-ring for the outside winder.

(https://i.imgur.com/unreyj2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/GS1Qan1.jpg)

New seals, lubricated, then outside piston wound into the caliper.  In the second photo, new square-cut O-ring seals for the brake fluid channels between the caliper halves, and showing one of the new spacers; these seals were 'wetted' with brake fluid.

(https://i.imgur.com/xkqyHMg.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NLeMDTW.jpg)

Right side caliper bolted back together, with bolts torqued to spec, and handbrake lever spring refitted.  Then secured back onto the gearbox.

(https://i.imgur.com/koddmhw.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/NYpTlnu.jpg)

Left side caliper parts ready for reassembly.

(https://i.imgur.com/45gm81h.jpg)

Handbrake lever, Welch plug, then piston reassembled.

(https://i.imgur.com/x9DnwQO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/csX3wI1.jpg)

Outside piston reassembled.

(https://i.imgur.com/LzBwuW4.jpg)

Spacers sitting in position, ready for other half of caliper and bolts to be added.

(https://i.imgur.com/7Z8h5nr.jpg)

Left side caliper completed.  New zinc plated wave washers, and cleaned original nuts, to secure the caliper to the gearbox studs.

(https://i.imgur.com/SOgtIxO.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/T1E6hTP.jpg)

Two rebuilt and painted rear calipers back into position.

(https://i.imgur.com/h7g2y85.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Bqe9Hpw.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [Updated 12 November 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on November 12, 2021, 01:15:01 AM
November 2021 - Part 3

Well...last month I said I wouldn't fall for the unnecessary replacement of brake lines.  But I couldn't resist  ::) .  The existing lines seemed ok, with no damage or corrosion.  However, the outer plastic coating was peeling or scratched on the pipes into the calipers, and also under the bonnet from the brake master cylinder.  I bit the bullet, and found a good source for new tubing, then bought the required tools for the job.

I chose copper-nickel tubing, which is of course ADR compliant, plus highly resistant to corrosion.  It's also relatively soft, making it easy to bend and form the flares on the ends.  The Alfa's brake pipe is 3/16" (4.75mm) outer diameter, and I purchased from Wide Bay Brake Hose Services in Queensland.

https://www.brakehose.com.au/

(https://i.imgur.com/rho0QNT.jpg)

This copper-nickel tubing was also seamless, whereas the original was Bundy tube.  Bundy tube is made by rolling up a flat sheet of metal then sealing the overlap seam; there's no issue using Bundy, but a solid-wall tube seems more elegant.  This photo shows the cross section of the new copper-nickel versus a piece of original pipe:

(https://i.imgur.com/UdqnmVM.jpg)

This was the new gear I purchased to build new pipes: in particular, the flaring kit with deburring tool, tube straightener, and tube benders.  I already had a tube cutter.  The straightener proved an excellent, useful tool, and of the two benders, the cheap blue version was my preferred after practising with each.

I would describe this flaring kit as an intermediate quality version.  It features a hydraulic ram.  Cheaper kits - though they can still be effective - look fiddly and require manual winding without hydraulic assistance.  More elaborate kits appear overkill for my needs, and better suited for doing this job repeatedly and frequently.  I calculated a total of 18 flares would be required for the new brake lines in my car.  Afterwards, I may never use the gear again!

(https://i.imgur.com/E2H1SuF.jpg)

The Alfa 75 uses two common flares, which I would describe as female and male endings (though they are not intended for joining together).  They are both SAE standard: 'double inverted' flare and 'bubble' (mushroom) flare.  When these flares are secured in position, the clamping force deforms and moulds the flare to create a perfect seal.  Thus, when using new flares, it is recommended to tighten, then loosen, then re-tighten, and do this four times, to ensure the flare is properly sealed, then torque the tube nut to spec.

(https://i.imgur.com/bKjuTA6.jpg)

A bubble flare is created in one stage: the tubing is held in a die, then an adapter (called an OP1 punch) compresses the end of the tubing into the bubble shape.

A double inverted flare is created in two stages: firstly, a bubble flare is made, then in stage two a cone-shaped adapter (OP2 punch) converts the bubble flare into a double inverted flare.

(https://i.imgur.com/xqx3lwz.jpg)

I first practised on a short length of tubing.  This was clamped in the 2-piece die, within a holder.  Then the (black) hydraulic ram pushed the adapter and compressed the tubing into a flare.

(https://i.imgur.com/4gDkRQ3.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/7siMmvL.jpg)

Voilà!  A bubble flare, then a double inverted flare!

(https://i.imgur.com/AicWNZq.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/fnSRMa1.jpg)

Now, onto the real thing!  I first made a new pipe for the rear right caliper.  Using some thin rope, I measured the length of the original, and cut new pipe to a similar length.  I reused the original tube nuts.  I read many reminders to ensure the nut is on the pipe before making the flare!  :o

(https://i.imgur.com/MzRDQ5a.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/VUDANfD.jpg)

Starting with a double inverted flare, I proceeded to carefully bend the pipe to replicate the shape of the original.  It's harder than it looks!  Well, at least for the first time.

(https://i.imgur.com/BSxNPkq.jpg)

Before creating the last bend, the end of the pipe needed to remain straight, to fit into the flaring die.  After the bubble flare was made, the pipe was bent into its final shape.

(https://i.imgur.com/SntA8kd.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/8k3Cl2D.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/cx3OOpt.jpg)

The new brake pipe was then secured in place.  After the initial tighten-loosen steps, the tube nuts were torqued to their final specification, using a flare nut socket piece.

(https://i.imgur.com/iDYSoFU.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/OljQylf.jpg)

With newfound confidence, I made a new pipe for the left rear caliper.

(https://i.imgur.com/u8jRWgk.jpg)

Two new pipes, from the original brass T-piece joiner to the calipers.

(https://i.imgur.com/XfOZx6A.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IK65u4t.jpg)
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [Updated 12 November 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on November 12, 2021, 01:16:14 AM
November 2021 - Part 4

Final instalment for this month: new brake discs.

The rear discs bolt between the diff axles and spacers.  The spacers had some surface rust.

After degreasing, the spacers were cleaned with wire brushes on a drill and Dremel.  One done, one to go.

(https://i.imgur.com/iSLyyCg.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/9SerMYd.jpg)

After both were cleaned, they were sprayed with Etch Primer then Primer Surfacer.  To avoid building-up a thick layer of paint, I masked the mating surfaces of each spacer after the first coat.  I painted some other parts at the same time.

(https://i.imgur.com/DD9SmU2.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/T0kRYby.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/mcPvGlj.jpg)

The exposed surfaces of the spacers were then painted metallic grey.

(https://i.imgur.com/PyNg8PN.jpg)

Right side Tarox ventilated disc, spacer, and re-using original bolts/washers.

(https://i.imgur.com/tIA2pMy.jpg)

Left side parts.

(https://i.imgur.com/z6h3PMQ.jpg)

New discs and spacers bolted in position.

(https://i.imgur.com/B44f656.jpg)

Then new brake pads.  These were Ferodo DS2500, which tolerate more abuse (heat) than standard pads, and great for a street car (also fine for some track work).  Lubricating the edge and back of the pads should prevent squeal.  I adjusted the pistons (wound them out), so the pads barely brushed the surface of the discs.  After bedding-in, they should be perfect.

(https://i.imgur.com/c57LVBC.jpg)

Here we are: refurbished calipers, spacers, new discs, new pads!  Richard Melvin, who supplied the spacer kit and made the pad retaining pins, wasn't exaggerating when he said he made the pins extra long to ease removal!  :P

(https://i.imgur.com/WItPfsp.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/fodpgec.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/IeuRedM.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/Ux7rSWI.jpg)

That's it for now.  Thanks again for looking!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [Updated 12 November 2021]
Post by: Colin Edwards on November 12, 2021, 08:47:55 AM
Impressive work!!

I fitted Tarox vented rotors to my 75, however your spacer kit is a bit different to the one I used.
You should be happy with the DS2500's.  I have these all round on my 75, though they work better with a bit of heat in them.  Leave a bit of room between you and the car in front when its cold!
There is a mod for the 75 brake balance where more bias is sent to the rears.  My 75 apparently has it.  Some widget adjacent the master cylinder as I recall.  The vented rears will certainly handle it!
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [Updated 12 November 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on November 12, 2021, 11:08:35 AM
Thanks Colin.  :)

I have DS2500 pads on my GT, and used to have them on the 159 Q4 we had.  I like them a lot.

I've seen photos of manually adjustable brake bias units fitted to these cars, in place of the 'automatic' factory limiter.  And my car originally came with nothing, from the previous owner!  My only concern - lack of confidence - is finding the right balance/bias.  The factory setup probably underutilises the rear brakes, but avoids any 'unsafe' rear lockup, particularly during cornering and/or in the wet.

But your suggestion is a timely reminder, and I will do more research into using an adjustable setup, and how to tune it properly (which the need for visiting a test track).

Cheers, Richard
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [Updated 12 November 2021]
Post by: Alfatango on November 12, 2021, 11:45:49 AM
Epic thread! Will have to catch up with it all from the beginning. There's a tonne of work that has gone into this.
Title: Re: Project car - 1989 75 3.0 V6 [Updated 12 November 2021]
Post by: shiny_car on November 12, 2021, 01:43:27 PM
Epic thread! Will have to catch up with it all from the beginning. There's a tonne of work that has gone into this.

Thanks! Enjoy the read: it's been years in the making  ;D lol.  It's been fun so far, and glad I have a project like this to keep me interested.